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Elementary Spanish (Discovery Streaming) Question


MamaAkins
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Last year, my 3rd grader and K'er did La Clase Divertida Level 1 together. I did not have my younger one do a lot of the writing, but they did well with learning the language. For the coming school year, we have decided to go with Elementary Spanish from Discovery Streaming since I can access it for free through my husband's school. However, I can't decide if I should do two separate levels (1st/2nd grade for my rising 1st grader and 3/4th grade for my rising 4th grader) or should I try to put them on the same level so they can continue to do spanish together. If so, which level should I put them on? I also have an 8th grader and a preschooler, so I would prefer to combine them, unless it would be a disadvantage to do so.

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If you want to combine them in one level, I'd probably put everybody in the 3/4 level. The 1/2 level is more.... IDK, childish? I don't mean that in a bad way, it's just more aimed at very young children. It's taught by a woman who speaks in a way that teacher's talk to little ones, but which an older student (even a 3rd grader) may find patronizing. Levels 3/4 and 5/6 are taught by Señor Morris, who is a terrific teacher, and I chose the 3/4 level to combine my 6th grader and 2nd grader this year, neither of whom had any Spanish previously. You could certainly fold in your 8th grader and maybe even your preschooler in 3/4 (although the littlest one obviously wouldn't be doing the worksheets). Alternatively, you could put the preschooler & 1st grader in 1/2 and the 4th grader and 8th grader in 5/6.

 

Once you watch a few lessons and look at the teacher's guides and worksheets, you'll have a better idea of whether you'd want them all together or in two groups.

 

Jackie

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If you want to combine them in one level, I'd probably put everybody in the 3/4 level. The 1/2 level is more.... IDK, childish? I don't mean that in a bad way, it's just more aimed at very young children. It's taught by a woman who speaks in a way that teacher's talk to little ones, but which an older student (even a 3rd grader) may find patronizing. Levels 3/4 and 5/6 are taught by Señor Morris, who is a terrific teacher, and I chose the 3/4 level to combine my 6th grader and 2nd grader this year, neither of whom had any Spanish previously. You could certainly fold in your 8th grader and maybe even your preschooler in 3/4 (although the littlest one obviously wouldn't be doing the worksheets). Alternatively, you could put the preschooler & 1st grader in 1/2 and the 4th grader and 8th grader in 5/6.

 

Once you watch a few lessons and look at the teacher's guides and worksheets, you'll have a better idea of whether you'd want them all together or in two groups.

 

Jackie

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions, Jackie! I'm leaning toward putting the middle two (my 1st and 4th grader) both in level 3/4. I usually have them do Spanish in the afternoon while my preschooler (just turned 3) takes a nap. My 8th grader has finished a year of Educacion Espanol (middle school spanish through Discovery Streaming), but is now switching to French (using Tell Me More).

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