Jump to content

Menu

Primary Source Docs


Aubrey
 Share

Recommended Posts

Any tips or tricks to *finding* them? We're in SOTW 4, so the amt of info avail is truly overwhelming on a broad scale, but when I try to zoom in at all...well, it's like I don't know which way to go.

 

I'm looking at pioneers at the moment, & nobody even agrees on the dates for this period. Then primary docs are all fragmented: here's the story of WA, here's the story of IL, etc. Not even a whole state, usually, but just one town.

 

So maybe it's a treasure hunt. Maybe I have to actually start reading works cited pgs & googling a lot, etc. Thoughts? Is it as wide open as it seems, or is there a methodical approach I'm missing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread had a lot of good primary document resources.

 

If you are looking specifically for info on Westward Expansion, this looks like a good resource: http://www.besthistorysites.net/USHistory_WestwardExpansion.shtml

 

At a glance--wow! This is perfect. Thank you!

 

What do y'all think about creating a social group that has links for primary docs, maybe w/ reviews if people have used them? Kinda like a sticky, I guess. Or like y'all doing my homework for me. ;)

 

Greensummervillian--are the jackdaws primary docs? I don't know why I hadn't realized that!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For America?

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/PrimDocsHome.html

 

More modern stuff:

 

http://www.historycentral.com/documents/index.html

 

Documents important to African Americans (includes a lot of court cases):

 

http://www.blackpast.org/?q=african-american-history-primary-documents

 

For Modern World history, here's one:

 

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html

 

Choose from the topics on the left, such as French Revolution, etc.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any tips or tricks to *finding* them? We're in SOTW 4, so the amt of info avail is truly overwhelming on a broad scale, but when I try to zoom in at all...well, it's like I don't know which way to go.

 

I'm looking at pioneers at the moment, & nobody even agrees on the dates for this period. Then primary docs are all fragmented: here's the story of WA, here's the story of IL, etc. Not even a whole state, usually, but just one town.

 

So maybe it's a treasure hunt. Maybe I have to actually start reading works cited pgs & googling a lot, etc. Thoughts? Is it as wide open as it seems, or is there a methodical approach I'm missing?

 

I would start with the National Archive and Library of Congress sites. Then I would expand to National Parks Service websites for sites in the states in question or related to the topic. Then I would hit state historical societies and state library websites.

 

I was thinking back a few weeks that it would be really cool to have some sort of a reference listing tied to each chapter of SOTW. Sort of like a wiki, where links to primary documents, activities, online games or tutorials could be listed.

 

You might even want to hit a library with your kids and look at a newspaper or journal on microfilm. I have browsed many newspapers in doing family history and other historical research. Ladies' Home Journal was a good one for turn of the century and WWI. I love reading ads because they are such a good glimpse into what life was about in a certain period. Ladies' Home Journal had a set of paper dolls in each issue. You can see the dolls becoming more war oriented through 1916 and 1917 as the US begins to shed its neutrality and then joins the war. The Lettie Lane dolls that Dover has reprinted on cardstock are a Ladies' Home Journal item from a little before the war. They are in their own way a primary document. I found some images of Betty Bonnet, the doll from 1916 -1918.

Edited by Sebastian (a lady)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One other thought is not to neglect your family history. What pictures do you have of grandparents/great grand parents? Would any of them have veteran's records that you could get. Were they mentioned in newspapers or city directories? Family history is a great tie in to SOTW 4 in that it reminds us that the events were happening to real people with real faces and real feelings. I have laid hands on the actual document that my great grandfather signed, renouncing his loyalty to anyone and anything other than the United States. That makes the concept of immigration spring up for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Alte Veste Academy
Any tips or tricks to *finding* them? We're in SOTW 4, so the amt of info avail is truly overwhelming on a broad scale, but when I try to zoom in at all...well, it's like I don't know which way to go.

 

I'm looking at pioneers at the moment, & nobody even agrees on the dates for this period. Then primary docs are all fragmented: here's the story of WA, here's the story of IL, etc. Not even a whole state, usually, but just one town.

 

So maybe it's a treasure hunt. Maybe I have to actually start reading works cited pgs & googling a lot, etc. Thoughts? Is it as wide open as it seems, or is there a methodical approach I'm missing?

 

I agree that it can seem overwhelming and wide open when you're doing broad Google searches on different topics. There have been some great suggestions on these threads.

 

One series I like is American Heritage's American Voices. Here is the link to the one on Westward Expansion. I have purchased all four in this series and quite enjoy having the selections to read and have at the ready without frustrating searches.

 

Also, I highly recommend Social Studies That Sticks to provide wonderful ways to think about and interpret primary sources, including pictures. This book is an absolute treasure! It transformed my thoughts on teaching history in the same way Liping Ma's book transformed my thoughts on teaching math.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've posted a few I've found on the board, but honestly, I got the impression that they weren't a very popular thing on the board. Or, perhaps the topics just didn't coincide with what others were studying.

 

I usually search for these words:

 

topic AND primary source AND teacher's guide

 

or something like that. I like having questions and things to ask.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some of the posts I've made:

 

Here are all sorts of other lesson plans for teaching with primary source documents:

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/

 

and here's another great website:

http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/history/history5.htm

 

 

Here are some analysis worksheets:

 

http://go.hrw.com/resources/go_ss/teacher99/toolkit/TOOLKT01.pdf

 

http://www.mdhs.org/teachers/worksheets.html

 

General explantion and worksheet about primary sources (distinguishing them):

 

http://www.archives.state.al.us/activity/actvty43.html

 

 

A "You Be the Historian" online webquest:

 

http://americanhistory.si.edu/kids/springer/

 

********************************************

 

This is a message I sent local WTMers after a discussion on some of our favorite primary source document resources:

 

Here is an example of the Scholastic Primary Sources Teaching Kit (I love these):

http://www.amazon.com/Civil-Primary-Sources-Teaching-Grades/dp/0590378635/ref=sr\

_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274149617&sr=1-1

 

It looks like the hands-on books I mentioned are out of print, but here is one anyway:

http://www.amazon.com/Hands-History-Explorers-Grades-4-8/dp/059039598X/ref=sr_1_\

5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274149763&sr=1-5

 

And, we built our Jamestown fort from this one which is not out of print:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Make-Learn-Projects-Create/dp/0439160316/ref=pd_sim_b\

_3

 

The Critical Thinking Press books can be seen here (these are great at analyzing documents):

http://www.criticalthinking.com/searchByNeed.do?code=p&catalog2=p&categories=bs&\

subjects=h&gradeLevel=99&code2=p&catalog3=p&x=18&y=14

 

And, here is the first book I mentioned in the Walch series (these have primary source document quotes and things to discuss):

http://www.amazon.com/Focus-U-s-History-Exploration-Discovery/dp/0825133343/ref=\

sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274150017&sr=1-4

Edited by nestof3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oxford University Press has a series called A History in Documents / Pages from History, which is 20 or so volumes of primary source docs, mostly for American history, but there are a few world history topics as well. You can find most of them used pretty cheap.

 

OUP also has single volumes of primary sources to go with their World in Ancient Times and Medieval and Early Modern World series. They are much cheaper than Jackdaws.

 

Jackie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is one about Laura Ingalls with some primary documents based on her life and times. More on Ingalls from the same site.

 

I know that I've also read an article about the locust that Ingalls Wilder describes in one of her books that had several primary sources in it. I think that it was an old Smithsonian, but I can't find it right now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys are killing me. I spent. all. day. looking through not even half the sites you linked on p1. Now there are TWO PAGES of this stuff?

 

Y'all are too awesome to keep up with.

 

It's interesting, too. In all of this, I've realized: I've never once read or researched *anything* to find out the truth. I've only ever completed assignments. I guess at the truth & count on a teacher to weigh it.

 

This feels so much more...well, there's a weight to the responsibility, & gosh, it's heavy. There's so much I didn't even know I didn't know. There's so much to keep straight & so many POVs. Even primary source docs are not above suspicion, if you think about the fake treaties the Indians signed.

 

Dawn--have you used the primary source kits you linked? They're so cheap! And...I'm about to go look at them for real, but just the pic & title, whoa. Very cool looking. How complete would you say they are? I mean, I realize "complete" is a pretty...ambiguous term in this case, but, generally speaking?

 

And, everybody--wow. Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be happy to send you the Westward Movement one to borrow. Just let me know. :)

 

You guys are killing me. I spent. all. day. looking through not even half the sites you linked on p1. Now there are TWO PAGES of this stuff?

 

Y'all are too awesome to keep up with.

 

It's interesting, too. In all of this, I've realized: I've never once read or researched *anything* to find out the truth. I've only ever completed assignments. I guess at the truth & count on a teacher to weigh it.

 

This feels so much more...well, there's a weight to the responsibility, & gosh, it's heavy. There's so much I didn't even know I didn't know. There's so much to keep straight & so many POVs. Even primary source docs are not above suspicion, if you think about the fake treaties the Indians signed.

 

Dawn--have you used the primary source kits you linked? They're so cheap! And...I'm about to go look at them for real, but just the pic & title, whoa. Very cool looking. How complete would you say they are? I mean, I realize "complete" is a pretty...ambiguous term in this case, but, generally speaking?

 

And, everybody--wow. Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm about to go look at them for real, but just the pic & title, whoa. Very cool looking. How complete would you say they are? I mean, I realize "complete" is a pretty...ambiguous term in this case, but, generally speaking?

I was really interested in these, too, but I read a review of the Explorers kit, which said that the letter from Columbus had been edited to remove most of the "instances of brutality in Columbus' and his crew's actions toward/perceptions of the native people" that were contained in the original letter. Which, to me, pretty much defeats the whole point of using primary sources. :(

 

Jackie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do not think "edited out" is a fair statement. It's more like there are only two pages of his journal and LOTS of parts were omitted. I would think most homeschoolers of grades 4-8 would read some of his actual log from a book. I know I did not depend on this primary sources resource to replace my important reading. I find these books valuable because they include photos of much more than just written documents. They also help steer me in the right direction to find a more detalied resource on the same source.

 

For example, in the Colonial America one, I googled the sources that this book mentions and found great teachers' guides in case I want to go deeper on a subject.

 

I was really interested in these, too, but I read a review of the Explorers kit, which said that the letter from Columbus had been edited to remove most of the "instances of brutality in Columbus' and his crew's actions toward/perceptions of the native people" that were contained in the original letter. Which, to me, pretty much defeats the whole point of using primary sources. :(

 

Jackie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...