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I mentioned earlier that there were primary historical documents available online at the National Archives website in the Teaching with Documents section. NARA also has an online exhibt section with more primary documents based on a subject or theme rather than a pure historical period.

 

The Library of Congress has Primary Source Sets

 

You can also find some interesting things just with good internet search. When we were reading Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, I found an amazing set of Depression era photographs of the South that we went through. Things like itinerant barbers setting up shop in a field or people delivering washing that they were taking in for extra money or just the low prices of for a Coke advertised on a drug store sign. I think that some of the photo sets I used was this one of cotton related photos and this set of Natchez.

 

We even found a cool cache of Alaskan Gold Rush period advertising when my kids were working on a special project last fall. (I had my kids writing ads targeting colonists moving to a space colony.)

 

I haven't used Jackdaws myself. Looking at their offerings for the Depression, it seems like they would be nice for group or classroom use since their sets are large format photos that would be rather sturdy. But $50+ for 12 photos seems high for home and family use.

 

Anyone have other favorite sources of primary documents.

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I'm not necessarily recommending these websites *as a whole*, but they have some great links and information. :)

 

Some of these are sources for literature, not just primary source documents, but they sometimes have original language texts, or even photos of original texts.

 

Literature:

http://classics.mit.edu/

 

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/

 

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/ovid/index.html

 

Documents:

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/medmenu.asp

 

http://www.malleusmaleficarum.org/

 

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.html (this one includes some of the journals of Columbus)

 

http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/wittenberg/wittenberg-home.html

 

http://www.libs.uga.edu/darchive/hargrett/maps/colamer.html

 

http://jesus-is-lord.com/kinginde.htm (warning: this one has music)

 

http://www.virtualjamestown.org/

 

http://www.historycentral.com/documents/index.html

 

http://www.historyteacher.net/

 

http://www.history.com/topics

 

This is a small sampling of what's in my bookmarks folder. If someone is looking for something specific, let me know! :D

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The National Archives of the US has a Gallery Page (amongst a gazillion other things) that has tons of images.

 

 

a

 

ETA: There is a shop on the main page that has prints for sale. You could easily click on them for viewing to show your child w/o needing to specifically buy them.

Edited by asta
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Oxford University Press publishes 2 history series for middle schoolers that are based on primary sources: The World in Ancient Times and The Medieval and Early Modern World. Each set contains a primary resource volume that moves in chronological order. The volumes can be purchased separately and are inexpensive. My didn't enjoy the first set (most kids do), but I find the resource books to be indispensable.

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Google books.

 

Use the advanced search function to get the specific topic and time period you are looking for.

 

When I was doing research for my History of Reading Instruction webpage at the Library of Congress and online, I was amazed at how powerful Google books was--I found it between my 1st and second trip to the Library of Congress. Being able to search inside the texts enables you to find resources about a specific topic that you would never think to look at if you were just searching by subject and book title.

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Oxford University Press publishes 2 history series for middle schoolers that are based on primary sources: The World in Ancient Times and The Medieval and Early Modern World. Each set contains a primary resource volume that moves in chronological order. The volumes can be purchased separately and are inexpensive. My didn't enjoy the first set (most kids do), but I find the resource books to be indispensable.

 

I second this. I've been drooling over them for months, and was finally able to find a set on the cheap. Their narrative style is great, and the focus on primary sources is ever-present.

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Bumping this. :)

 

Greek textbooks, lots of excellent materials for classical and modern Greek; even if you cannot speak modern Greek, you can check their approach at teaching classical Greek, compare the texts they use, etc. I seriously recommend this source for anyone dealing with any form of Greek.

 

Not sure how many people do Italian, but just in case somebody does: biblioteca dei classici italiani.

 

Bibliotheca Augustana is also very good with lots of useful stuff.

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The National Archives of the US has a Gallery Page (amongst a gazillion other things) that has tons of images.

 

 

a

 

ETA: There is a shop on the main page that has prints for sale. You could easily click on them for viewing to show your child w/o needing to specifically buy them.

 

Here's another great resource: Library of Congress

 

If you click on the various parts of the homepage, you get access to a huge variety of maps, old photos, documents, etc. Really cool.

 

Even better to actually visit. :D

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Unless Jackdaws have changed, the photos I have in my sets are not any sturdier than any similar photos I've found in books. They're just printed on regular paper. In fact, I've found pictures of the same artifacts, etc. elsewhere that are of better quality.

 

Their review questions are good for group discussions, but I think you can probably think of things to discuss on your own in most instances, too....

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Unless Jackdaws have changed, the photos I have in my sets are not any sturdier than any similar photos I've found in books. They're just printed on regular paper. In fact, I've found pictures of the same artifacts, etc. elsewhere that are of better quality.

 

Their review questions are good for group discussions, but I think you can probably think of things to discuss on your own in most instances, too....

 

Hm, I'm curious, how old are your Jackdaws and which do you have? I have several, but they are all "ancients" (okay, I also have the 1066 one). I bought them when eldest was in...fourth grade, I think? She's now a rising ninth grader. I have said several times on this board that I do not feel that Jackdaws are worth the price for homeschoolers. However, the photos contained in mine are printed on sturdy, glossy cardstock, not on regular paper.

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Oxford University Press publishes 2 history series for middle schoolers that are based on primary sources: The World in Ancient Times and The Medieval and Early Modern World. Each set contains a primary resource volume that moves in chronological order. The volumes can be purchased separately and are inexpensive. My didn't enjoy the first set (most kids do), but I find the resource books to be indispensable.

:drool5: Oh I WANT!!! And they have TGs, oh oh oh. They look delicious.

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http://www.bl.uk/learning/index.html

 

The British Library has documents and document-based lesson plans and explorations in history and literature. I've found some treasures. A few years ago there was a special exhibit on-line featuring various illustrations to Alice in Wonderland that gave us months of research and fascination (and the buying of a different edition of Alice just for the pictures we liked best).

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