Menu
Jump to content
ATTENTION: Forums search will not work until re-indexing is completed. Please follow these instructions for search

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Cleopatra

Do any of you get paid to homeschool ......???

Recommended Posts

I'm reasonably new to the boards but have been following them for some time. And it's in the last little while, it's hit me that I am probably one of the few homeschoolers who can choose to get paid to homeschool ...... and I wanted to find out if this is indeed true.

 

I live in the province of British Columbia. If you choose to homeschool, you can do one of two things: you can choose to be a registered homeschooler where you receive $150 per child, you have no teacher overseeing you, no exams for your dc to take, etc. OR, you can decide to ENROLL.

 

Enrollment is a complicated 'animal'. You are no longer officially labelled a homeschooler; you are called a 'distance learner'. You have a teacher who oversees you. If you enroll with a public-type school (sort of public schools for homeschoolers .... hard to explain), you have to give your teacher 3 portfolios per year. If you enroll with an independent school, you have to give 3 portfolios PLUS report by e-mail weekly. You are required to follow the B.C. Learning Outcomes put in place by the Ministry of Education (which are confusing and rambling and sometimes I'm not sure if they're in English:D). For all this, you are given $1000 per child for curriculum each year. I believe you are supposed to return any non-consumables to your school by the end of the year but this never happens so you can keep all the curricula, books, etc, that you buy. Your child receives a report card at the end of the year, from someone who rarely sees them.

 

Does this sound like a good deal to anyone? It seems so at first, but I've found it's not. Often you get teachers pushing public school curricula (which is generally just busy-work, not to mention mind-numbing) and you constantly have to fight against it. Many moms who are new to homeschooling, because they have the safety net of the teacher, don't bother to find out anything about homeschooling and get caught in the public school work trap ....... their kids end up hating the work but they aren't sure what else to do. You also have teachers who try to support your use of homeschool curricula but really know little about it, so if you ask them for assistance, they often cannot really help you (this is one of the reasons I've joined these boards, as you all have such wonderful insight and information :001_smile:) Many homeschoolers here, know very little about the curricula discussed on these boards.

 

So after my ramble (thanks for reading this far), does anyone else have the option of getting paid to homeschool, or is B.C. the only place in the world who funds homeschooling? I wonder ........????

 

P.S. And next year, I'm registering ........ :auto:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No such option here. We pay to belong to a legal defence fund which defends our right to be able to homeschool.

 

$1000 for books does sound enticing.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not here either. I am in Oklahoma and the state gives me nothing and I give them nothing. It's very nice. We are accountable to noone. I kind of like being invisible....:001_smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alaska has a deal for homeschoolers... Last time I heard... the family said $1500 for school per child AND it can be used for anything "educational" including things like water parks and ballet...

 

Hmmmm :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alaska has a deal for homeschoolers... Last time I heard... the family said $1500 for school per child AND it can be used for anything "educational" including things like water parks and ballet...

 

 

Ah, it's nice to know B.Cers aren't living in a homeschool Twilight Zone (although it feels like it sometimes!:001_smile:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alaska has a deal for homeschoolers... Last time I heard... the family said $1500 for school per child AND it can be used for anything "educational" including things like water parks and ballet...

 

Hmmmm :)

 

There's something available in Idaho, too, but I can't remember what it's called. There is some oversight and you get a sum of money per year per child to use on curriculum and other educational things, like the pp said, ballet, karate, etc. I looked into it, and it's really not a lot of hoops to jump through (and we don't have the extra income for my dc to do things like martial arts), but I just didn't want to change how we were doing things. Currently, we don't have to do anything for the state - and I like it that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In NZ we have to register to homeschool. Then we get about NZ$750 per oldest child per year. Younger ones are on a sliding scale, with a bit less for each one. We can spend it on what we like, although all mine goes on curriculum because of exchange rates and postage from the US.

 

We have to declare we are teaching "at least as regularly and as well as a public school" every 6 months, and that is it.

 

The Educational Review office can visit you, and will if there have been complaints, to see if you are teaching "as least as regularly etc" but as homeschoolers almost never fail the inspections, they don't come any more. :D Apparently it is uneconomic to worry about us and the inspectors would be better off spending their time in schools!

 

Willow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alaska has a deal for homeschoolers... Last time I heard... the family said $1500 for school per child

 

This is what I have heard from my friend who knows a family in mission work in Alaska. Although, that's a good deal, I don't think we'll be moving there anytime soon. I'm too much of a wimp for the cold; I'll stay right here in the SE US!:001_smile:

 

Jennifer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have public charter schools here in California too. Your child is a public school student, enrolled, and the family gets various amounts of money to be used for curriculum. It is not cash but curriculum provided for your child's use. They vary in degrees of restrictiveness from completely parent-chosen basically (i.e., pretty flexible, secular only though) to the school gets to decide the curriculum (i.e., restrictive).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In NZ we have to register to homeschool. Then we get about NZ$750 per oldest child per year. Younger ones are on a sliding scale, with a bit less for each one. We can spend it on what we like, although all mine goes on curriculum because of exchange rates and postage from the US.

 

We have to declare we are teaching "at least as regularly and as well as a public school" every 6 months, and that is it.

 

The Educational Review office can visit you, and will if there have been complaints, to see if you are teaching "as least as regularly etc" but as homeschoolers almost never fail the inspections, they don't come any more. :D Apparently it is uneconomic to worry about us and the inspectors would be better off spending their time in schools!

 

Willow.

 

Wow. This just adds to my list of reasons for wanting to live in NZ.

 

Laura

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in California. We are enrolled in a public charter school. We are given $400 for any secular curriculum plus $550 for vendor classes. In place of vendor classes, the school hosts academic classes (history, science, writing, PE) as well as fun classes (art, gymnastic, golf, swimming, etc) in school. We also have choir and theatre. We are given a teacher to oversee the education and we have to turn in work samples. Field trip occurs every 5 weeks. They are pretty strict about testing though. School provides MAPS testing and we have do STAR testing every year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't get anything from the state here in NJ but we don't have to do anything either. The law actually states that we have to be providing equivalent instruction but that's pretty open to interpretation. If someone reports you delinquent, you have to send a letter saying you're homeschooling and that's it - the burden is put on the school district to prove you're not doing enough.

 

Schools in NJ (especially right now) have WAY more to worry about that harassing homeschoolers. They have some serious budget woes right now.

 

I read somewhere that in some states you can claim educational materials as a tax deduction on your state taxes. Anyone know about this and what states it applies to?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not here either. I am in Oklahoma and the state gives me nothing and I give them nothing. It's very nice. We are accountable to noone. I kind of like being invisible....:001_smile:

 

Ditto to what she said.

 

There's something available in Idaho, too, but I can't remember what it's called. There is some oversight and you get a sum of money per year per child to use on curriculum and other educational things, like the pp said, ballet, karate, etc. I looked into it, and it's really not a lot of hoops to jump through (and we don't have the extra income for my dc to do things like martial arts), but I just didn't want to change how we were doing things. Currently, we don't have to do anything for the state - and I like it that way.

 

I will have to look into that there is a slim chance we could end up in Idaho. Thanks for the heads up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We don't get anything from the state here in NJ but we don't have to do anything either. The law actually states that we have to be providing equivalent instruction but that's pretty open to interpretation. If someone reports you delinquent, you have to send a letter saying you're homeschooling and that's it - the burden is put on the school district to prove you're not doing enough.

 

Schools in NJ (especially right now) have WAY more to worry about that harassing homeschoolers. They have some serious budget woes right now.

 

I read somewhere that in some states you can claim educational materials as a tax deduction on your state taxes. Anyone know about this and what states it applies to?

 

Louisiana passed this for state taxes and it started last year. It is a nonrefundable tax credit though.

The deduction is for 50 percent of the costs paid per dependent, limited to $5,000.

However, that does not mean that you get back $2500. What that means is that you can deduct some percentage off of your taxable income and move down a tax bracket. It was confusing and not as good as everyone thought in the end. Also, it says only SBESE approved home study programs are eligible. SBESE approved programs have to answer to the state and test yearly and such. Private schools not seeking state approval do not have to answer to anyone.

I debated seriously about switching to SBESE to get this credit until I realized it would only give us about $30 back on our state refund after it was all said and done.

I think it will entice new homeschoolers to choose the SBESE home study program over the private school option in the misguided belief that they will get 1/2 of the money they will spend on curriculum back in tax refund dollars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're signed up through a charter school in CA. It has given us many opportunities to do things, learn things, and use things we may otherwise had never had the chance to do, learn, or use. Some people think it's "selling out" to the PS system, but it's a good opportunity for us. Especially having to live on a grad. student stipend.

 

In exchange for...

*meeting with an accredited teacher every 3 weeks (she comes to my house)

*taking the standardized test (which is possible to get out of)

*completing a writing assignment the school sets up (also possible to get out of)

*piecing together a very simple portfolio of the boys' work

 

We get...

*a large amount of money to use for curricula (secular), supplies, games, books, activities, supplemental items like Discovery Streaming,ect.

*to participate in great classes (fencing, rock climbing, drama, art, Latin, swim lessons, ect)

*to attend plays and musicals and visit museums.

 

I lucked out and got a great adviser who believes in homeschooling (she is a homeschool mom herself!) and does not push PS standards on me AT ALL. She supports my decisions 100% and leaves me alone (I like that!). Like I said, it's a great situation for *us*.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! Sounds like a pretty nice deal, though I'd take the $150/kid option and teach them what I wanted, instead of the state's mandated curriculum. That would still be $900 for our family! That would buy a lot of curriculum :D

 

We don't get anything in MO, but now you have me curious. Maybe I'll google "Can I get paid to homeschool in MO?" LOL!

 

Isn't there some sort of federal educational tax credit, too? :confused: I don't know, since we've never tried to take it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not here either. I am in Oklahoma and the state gives me nothing and I give them nothing. It's very nice. We are accountable to noone. I kind of like being invisible....:001_smile:

 

:iagree: As nice as it sounds to receive money for homeschooling, this is why I love homeschooling in Oklahoma!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We don't get anything from the state here in NJ but we don't have to do anything either. The law actually states that we have to be providing equivalent instruction but that's pretty open to interpretation. If someone reports you delinquent, you have to send a letter saying you're homeschooling and that's it - the burden is put on the school district to prove you're not doing enough.

 

Schools in NJ (especially right now) have WAY more to worry about that harassing homeschoolers. They have some serious budget woes right now.

 

I read somewhere that in some states you can claim educational materials as a tax deduction on your state taxes. Anyone know about this and what states it applies to?

 

In MN if your yearly income is under 35,000 you can get up to $750 dollars worth of "educational expenses" paid for in a tax credit. Any income can claim those expenses (up to $2500 I think) as a deduction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. I had no idea how different each state's requirements were. Here in FL we have to register with the local school district and provide test scores or a portfolio each year demonstrating that our kids are on-track. We get no $$.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do not get any money in Wyoming. We have to submit our letter of intent to the public schools before the first day of public school year and they have to have their little board meeting to "approve" our "requests" as they call them. They have never dared to "disapprove" anybody-- which is good. In our letter we have to provide the address we will be homeschooling at, the curricula for each subject or a comprehensive scope and sequence and inform them we will not be in need of any of their services for the year. So far that is it. Thank goodness no testing! I wouldn't want to get paid if I had to get secular curricula with it. I wouldn't use it. We love our Christian curriculum! One of the biggest reasons we homeschool!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Alberta, you can receive $750-1500(approx, think it is actually $747) depending on if you are traditional(you get $750), to blended(somewhere in between) to full aligned(can get full $1500).

 

No matter what, you can expect meeting with a facilitator 2x per year, and in mid year phone call. They want to see a portfolio to see that learning outcomes are being attained, that learning is occurring. Traditional, you pick the curriculum, what you will be teaching. To blended, which may involve correspondence or online learning being checked by teachers and you doing your own thing and needing to send samples in. To just doing school at home online and not necessarily teaching yourself just helping based on the courses, is how my school board explained, it's pretty simplistic, there is more in depth things going on, the in's and out's but I am traditional so they are pretty hands off, only doing the 2 required visits and one email/phone call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't get any money in Michigan. Unless you want your child to receive auxillary services or elective classes you don't need to do anything either though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in AK and I'm familiar w/ the 4 main homeschool programs. You don't just get handed a wad of cash, but they will reimburse for approved things IF you're enrolled in one of these programs, each connected w/ a ps district. You have to meet w/ a teacher & set up their ILP/IEP (forgot which it's called) at the beggining of ea. year. They will only reimburse for secular materials (although 1 program reimburses for materials from religious publishers that aren't necessarily religious - Horizons math for instance) directly related to courses listed on your ILP.

 

They don't reimburse for the water park, that rule is listed specifically in the handbook. They will only reimburse for "fun" field trips (zoo, museum, etc.) if you show how it correlates to your child's ILP, and the child has to write a report about it. You have to participate in mandated state testing and have contact (any contact) w/ the "teacher" once a month. You have to turn in work samples from each child every quarter. Some programs are strict about wanting to know what lesson out of how many lessons total the child is on, others just take the work sample you hand them no questions asked.

 

I manage to use whatever I want, including Christian curriculum; do whatever I want (year-round instead of Sept - May), and still participate in their system. I list whatever course I want on the kids' ILP, even if it's Christian, and the program can still reimburse for non-religious support materials (like stuff for science experiements even though the main program is Apologia, but they wouldn't pay me back for the Apologia itself). They don't allow you to put all your reimbursement funds towards elective-type classes, they will only pay for a balance of things - so if you use up all your PE funds before the ballet year is up (or karate, piano lessons, etc.), you pay the rest on your own, even though you may still have funds available for "core" classes like math, science, & lang. arts.

 

Any one item purchased for reimbursement cannot exceed $199, and all items or lessons/tutoring must be from an approved vendor (if you want reimbursement, that is.) They don't prevent you from paying for things yourself that are not on the "approved" list, so they're not necessarily pushing ps curric. onto homeschoolers.

 

There's alot of rules but it can be a sweet deal if you get to know the system well. The moment their system gets in my way, I'll go completely independent, which is another option in AK. I think all of you should move up here & we can have a WTM co-op. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't articulate properly, there is up to $747-1500 in reimbursements, not just a wad of cash. Most things can be, memberships, lessons, materials, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our state has a virtual school we could use. As others have said, I won't use them. If I did, my children would be legally considered ps students. I want absolutely no connection to public schools in any way. $$ doesn't entice me b/c with $$ always comes strings. I want freedom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Our state has a virtual school we could use. As others have said, I won't use them. If I did, my children would be legally considered ps students. I want absolutely no connection to public schools in any way. $$ doesn't entice me b/c with $$ always comes strings. I want freedom.

:iagree::iagree::iagree:

 

In Oregon we don't get any $$ either but could opt to participate in a virtual charter school with state chosen curriculum. We looked into it (briefly!!) and they required my KINDERGARTEN student to log 20 HOURS of school work (read: SEAT WORK) every week. I was like, "Are you NUTS????" Sheesh. That and the THOUGHT of the state government breathing down my neck was enough to make me :auto: with a smile on my face. I'll leave the provision for home school curriculum in God's hands!! :D We DO have to report our students to the local school district when they are 7 and we are required to begin testing in 3rd grade. I wish we could just be off the radar completely though! There is always something happening "on the hill" with the state legislature here. There are quite a few law makers who don't support home schooling. Thank God for those savvy folks that stand up in defense of home schooling and debate with these law makers on the hill. More than once in recent years some nasty legislation has been stopped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In MN if your yearly income is under 35,000 you can get up to $750 dollars worth of "educational expenses" paid for in a tax credit. Any income can claim those expenses (up to $2500 I think) as a deduction.

 

I should clarify. This is for all students. I would imagine a homeschooler racks up more costs, but there are no strings attached to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Cheryl in SoCal
Our state has a virtual school we could use. As others have said, I won't use them. If I did, my children would be legally considered ps students. I want absolutely no connection to public schools in any way. $$ doesn't entice me b/c with $$ always comes strings. I want freedom.

:iagree::iagree:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine does something similar in washington state. Her son goes to a mixed grade class two days a week and the district will pay for materials from an approved list.

 

It would drive me crazy but it works for her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids are enrolled in BC also, with a small Christian school. I appreciate that we qualify for the $1000 per student in funds as my husband is a student this year. I have never had any problems purchasing any curriculum I want.

 

I agree about the PLOs though. I just submit a list of what we have done to our "teacher" and let her worry about ticking the boxes.

 

I have considered registering instead and wouldn't hesitate if I felt our values and beliefs behind homeschooling became compromised.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So after my ramble (thanks for reading this far), does anyone else have the option of getting paid to homeschool, or is B.C. the only place in the world who funds homeschooling? I wonder ........????

 

P.S. And next year, I'm registering ........ :auto:

 

No option here. But we need to send our "Intent to Homeschool". Then we need to either to an evaluation or a test at end of year. Sometimes I feel like moving to Oklahoma or Alaska or somewhere else where it's less hassle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm addressing the OP with this. . .

 

I remember this general idea coming up in other threads. In general -- and I am not issuing ANY kind of "right or wrong" regarding this -- I implacably support parents' rights to provide any bona fide education for their children that they choose -- . . . In general, the customary definition of homeschooling, which definition can be very broad, does not include education that requires certain kinds of involvement with "the State", which includes state-paid stipends for purchasing curricula, periodic assessment by a state-paid teacher, enrollment in a charter (or "virtual") school, and so forth. These students are participating in "distance education". Again, distance education is neither "right" nor "wrong". It simply is one type of education, but is not homeschooling, according to the generally-accepted use of that term. Receiving payment from the government places education into the distance-ed category. The only exception I know of is the tax credit issued to income-qualifying families by Minnesota. But a tax credit is not the same as payment to encourage homeschooling.

 

I often have thought about the K-12 charter, "at home" option; however, it is inflexible in many ways, and I have an LD student whose needs dictate our choices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Willow mentioned, there is a payment in New Zealand. As I recall, the payment existed because parents of distance learners were paid a "supervisor's allowance" or something like that, and homeschoolers fell under the same law? It certainly counted in NZ's favour when we were considering moving there!

 

Here in Australia we don't get paid, but we do get a tax rebate for anything spent on education. According to a tax specialist we spoke to, that could include Internet payments etc, and we include all books, outings etc that I remember to record. It's open to all parents, but is most beneficial to homeschoolers or private schoolers, one would suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't have any funding at all here. I have spoken to our state and federal governments and although we pay taxes to educate other peoples children we are not entitled to any of those funds to educate our own! I think it really sucks! We also have a moderator attend yearly to check on your childs progress and your plans for the future. If they don't like what they see they can revoke your right to homeschool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest rubilynne4
We have public charter schools here in California too. Your child is a public school student, enrolled, and the family gets various amounts of money to be used for curriculum. It is not cash but curriculum provided for your child's use. They vary in degrees of restrictiveness from completely parent-chosen basically (i.e., pretty flexible, secular only though) to the school gets to decide the curriculum (i.e., restrictive).

 

ditto for me in sac ca. i hope it isn't anathema to you all, but i do use an indepenndent charter school, and it works well for us, but i think that as my children get to be in middle school and high school it will become much more restrictive. we may opt to become completely independent at that point. that said, most of the curriculum i choose would be considered classical by most here, but nothing sectarian is allowed. i often supplement myself when i find something i want to use that the school doesn't allow. for ex i am using rod and staff english for my grammar next year instead of having the school purchase it. but for writing and literature i am using IEW SWI and Teaching the Classics which the school is purchasing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in Ohio we get nothing, but we pay A LOT in property taxes to fund the public schools. We do have to send in a list of the books we use each year and EITHER have the children tested each year OR have their portfolio reviewed each year. I know many people feel we shuld get a tax break, but honestly I am happy just as long as I am not told WHAT I have to teach.:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our school district offers a minimal amount ($70) or so per child. Can't be used for any religious materials and needs to be materials used directly with the child. Technically, the material is considered district property, although I think it's rare they ask for it. This year I chose not to receive the money, but next year I will only enough to pay for the testing my state makes me do (my dh was not happy I didn't reimburse myself for that). I firmly believe the more I take from the govn't the more they can take away.... I highly value my right to home school the way I want to so if it were up to me I would not accept any $$$, I need to bend to my dh's wishes though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Washington has a lot of different options:

 

Independent homeschool: You must "qualify" to homeschool (one of four options), declare your intent to homeschool each year, must teach 11 subjects, must keep records, and must test every year after the age of 8. No one checks the records/scores except maybe if you reenter public school or have CPS issues. You get no funding or tax breaks.

 

Part time public school: You do all of the above but you can enroll part time in the public school for classes of your choice. You are considered both a homeschooler and a public schooler.

 

Various Parent Partner Programs: You do all of the independent homeschool stuff but can also choose to enroll in enrichment classes offered by the school district. You are considered a homeschooler and a public schooler.

 

Washington Virtual Academy: WAVA provides you with the K12 curriculum, gives you the schedule you are to follow, requires daily online attendance, and does your annual testing requirement. I'm not completely familiar with their requirements so I may be partly wrong about the above and I may be missing requirements. You can enroll part time or full time. If part time, you are both a homeschooler and a public schooler. If full time, you are a public schooler.

 

Columbia Virtual Academy: There are two programs. If you enroll in their custom program, you get up to $1200 fund per student per year to spend on curriculum, extra curricular activities, field trips, and supplies. You chose your curriculum (they can't use the funding for religious curriculum), your teaching method, your schedule, etc. Attendance is by weekly phone calls or email by the student. A monthly review is submitted by the parent. They do your annual testing at no cost to you. If you enroll in their Calvert Partner Program everything above applies except that you get the full Calvert curriculum instead of the fund. Their requirements are very homeschooler friendly and flexible. You can enroll part time or full time. If part time, you are both a homeschooler and a public schooler. If full time, you are a public schooler.

 

In all the above programs, you must comply with WA homeschool laws if you are a homeschooler either part or full time. The oversight by the certified teacher through the virtual academies is one way to "qualify" to homeschool. The others include having a certain number of college credits or taking a homeschool certification class or being deemed qualified by the school district.

 

ETA: We use the custom program at Columbia Virtual Academy. The fund pays for DS's taekwondo, DD's and DS's swimming lessons for the past 3 months, and some of our curriculum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing like that here. If you want to homeschool it comes out of your own pocket. Our state offers cyberschooling , which is free curriculum( their choice , not yours) with teacher oversight. So really its not free at all.

Other then that we pay Homeschool Legal Defense just in case we have issues with our school district to defend our right to homeschool. PA is one of a few of the strictest homeschooling states in the U.S.

 

I wish someone gave me money to homeschool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kisses, hugs.

 

I also got a nice picture on Mother's day that said "Thanks i'm Homeschooled! Love You!"

 

I didn't even mention the capitalization issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard that they have this available in my state but I have also heard you get ZERO say in what the child learns, you must use the curriculum that they pick. I've also been told that by enrolling in these programs, the state has the right to come into your house to check up on you because you are technically a satellite of the public school system. So basically you are giving up all the freedom you gain by home schooling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No option here. But we need to send our "Intent to Homeschool". Then we need to either to an evaluation or a test at end of year. Sometimes I feel like moving to Oklahoma or Alaska or somewhere else where it's less hassle.

 

Or Indiana. There are literally no rules here except "keep attendance". We have to go to school for 180 days but there is no definition of what qualifies as a "day." We don't have to report to anyone, take any tests or do anything else!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A girl can dream....not a penny....but also very little oversight. IF I had to gain much oversight or legal boundaries in order to get said money, then I wouldn't want it, but if things could be basically the same....I'd be happy to get a lil' for each child. P.S. gets over $8,000 a year here....can you imagine what all of us could do with that much money!?!?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We don't have any funding at all here. I have spoken to our state and federal governments and although we pay taxes to educate other peoples children we are not entitled to any of those funds to educate our own!

 

:iagree:

 

I have to say I appreciate being able to use the library. The state charter school is no longer an option for us. The charter wants to go strictly by the age appropiate grade level. They refused to accept transcripts stating they did not come from an accredited school. We do not feel right making our kids repeat material they have already completed. Times are tough for us at the moment, as they are for many other families. I would like some curriculum allowance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't get anything for homeschooling. I do so independently. I'm not tied to any charter school or other programs. If someone does elect the charter school option they are essentially considered a public school student and are subject to the rules of public schools.

 

The HSLDA discourages it's members from using charter schools as they say it takes away the parent's right to choose the education for their child since they are essentially a public school student just being taught from home.

 

They also will "NOT" defend anyone that uses a charter school setup as they say it's not homeschooling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nada thing! We don't have to do much in the way of "proof" except a test at year end. I would be happy with some kind of tax credit for supplies...although we never qualify for anything anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alaska has a deal for homeschoolers... Last time I heard... the family said $1500 for school per child AND it can be used for anything "educational" including things like water parks and ballet...

 

Hmmmm :)

Intersting, I wonder what living in Alaska is like . . . . .:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're going to be using a public charter for the upcoming school year. We won't be paid to homeschool, but will receive funding for activities and curriculum. The charter we chose is very, very flexible. The parents I've talked to run the gamut of homeschool philosophies, from classical to traditional textbooks to full-on unschooling.

 

The only requirements are meeting with a school rep 1/mo (from what I've heard the meetings last all of 20 min. No big deal), over the course of the year create a portfolio of work and participate in state testing. None of this is a big deal to us. In exchange they provide funding for secular curriculum and/or activities. (I can use sectarian curriculum, but I'd have to pay for it myself).

 

I no longer have to try to homeschool for free. YEAH!

 

Legally they'll be public school students, but socially and academically they're homeschoolers. I direct their educations, set the pace, choose the curriculum, and customize every aspect of how we do things... all from home (or the library or car :001_smile: ).

 

So, so, so tired of holier-than-thou discussions about "real" homeschoolers versus "fake" homeschoolers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & RECEIVE A COUPON FOR
10% OFF
We respect your privacy.You’ll hear about new products, special discounts & sales, and homeschooling tips. *Coupon only valid for first-time registrants. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. Entering your email address makes you eligible to receive future promotional emails.
0 Shares
Share
Tweet
Pin
×