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We are having a dilemma in our house. DS will be 5 in a couple of weeks and thus, would start K in the fall if in a public school.

 

However, when someone asks him what grade he is in, he responds either with 3rd or 4th grade :001_huh:. I know he is coming up with this answer because some of his books say 3rd or 4th grade on them and he has heard me discussing his reading level with the librarian when trying to find appropriate books for him to read.

 

I have tried to tell him to respond with 'I am homeschooled', but so far, that isn't working very well.:glare:

 

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Ah, we have been through that here as well. I told DD that the numbers don't always match up to grade levels because sometimes you are meant to do more than one level in a year. Explode the Code is a great example of this. Once she got past those numbers, she realized it was easier just to tell folks she was homeschooled.

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My kids just answer their grade by age because that's really what most people want to know. I have explained to them that what grade level book they are using has no relationship to what grade they are in.

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My kids just answer their grade by age because that's really what most people want to know.
:iagree:

I have coached the kids to say, "If I were in school, I'd be in x grade," and they use their grade by age.

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:iagree:

I have coached the kids to say, "If I were in school, I'd be in x grade," and they use their grade by age.

We do this, too.

 

It doesn't keep my 5 year old from launching into a lengthy explanation, either. Oh for the days when she was speech delayed. :tongue_smilie:

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This was a significant problem for my oldest dd. She was constantly barraged by people about her grade level. She replied with the grade level at which she worked. We decided with our other two (and now the firstborn also) that they should simply state their age and that they are homeschooled. Sometimes, people persist and inquire regarding what work they are doing. In that case, my children tell them.

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My kids just answer their grade by age because that's really what most people want to know. I have explained to them that what grade level book they are using has no relationship to what grade they are in.

:iagree: My ds knows that he's still in Kindergarten despite what his workbooks say and will answer with that when asked. In fact, our church just wrote a new policy that hs'ers attend Sunday school classes with their agemates. I guess they've had some 9-10yos who wanted to attend the middle school group because they were doing middle school work and that didn't sit right with our Children's Pastor (and I can understand why).

 

I also have a friend who is sensitive that her girls are "behind" in some of their subjects and don't want to make that perception worse for her or her dds. All of our friends know that both of my older boys are very advanced learners and they will often ask D-Man what he's studying which has little to do with his grade.

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This was a significant problem for my oldest dd. She was constantly barraged by people about her grade level. She replied with the grade level at which she worked. We decided with our other two (and now the firstborn also) that they should simply state their age and that they are homeschooled. Sometimes, people persist and inquire regarding what work they are doing. In that case, my children tell them.

 

This might work :tongue_smilie:. We have really tried hard with the appropriate grade level for age but it just doesn't work. But changing it around to age and homeschooled may be an easier sell. And I know, if someone persists, that DS will tell them what he is doing.:D

 

Thanks for all your help. We will be role playing this scenario all summer!!!

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A few summers ago I was on staff for a music camp for 4-7 yr old kids, and the topic of grade levels came up one lunchtime, with the kids popping in with "I'm going to K at X school" or "I'm going to be in 2nd grade next year". Finally, one girl was asked what grade she was in. She replied "I don't know. Maybe 4th or 5th? I'm homeschooled!". The kids had no trouble with it.

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Honestly? I don't mind my kids telling people where they really are. They've worked hard, and they're proud of every little accomplishment like they would be if they were average or below average in grade level. How does grade level or ability make a child's sense of accomplishment any different? If people raise eyebrows, they can come to me to clear up any misconceptions. People usually don't say anything unless it's postive.

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Honestly? I don't mind my kids telling people where they really are.
"Where they are" doesn't carry much meaning in our household with respect to grade levels. If someone asks specific questions about what the kids are doing (assuming they have a friendly, curious attitude rather than a "fishing" one), that's easy enough to answer, but how does one respond to, "What grade are you in?" when the same child is age appropriate for handwriting, stalling for time before starting algebra, reading a high school level or beyond, etc. It doesn't make sense, and there's no succinct way to answer other than something like "We meet her where she is," or "She works at her level in each subject." If someone wants more detail, they'll follow up with more questions; however, I find that the vast majority of people ask only because they're trying to make polite conversation, and they don't really care to know specifics. This is true of age peers as well; the specifics of "where" the kids are is simply doesn't come up because the kids are interested in other things.
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Honestly? I don't mind my kids telling people where they really are. They've worked hard, and they're proud of every little accomplishment like they would be if they were average or below average in grade level. How does grade level or ability make a child's sense of accomplishment any different? If people raise eyebrows, they can come to me to clear up any misconceptions. People usually don't say anything unless it's postive.

That is what I am talking about. Generally my attitude has been truth as those who are genuinely curious are often interested in hearing all about Latin, peyote weaving and whatever other passionate interest of the year has captivated dd. When they mutter oh and stumble around a bit for a response I know they are just trying to figure out just how smart dd is. Once they are taller and past puberty no one can guess their age so easily and life is certainly less combative on the social front . I have never disliked so many people in so many different places as when we were a younger family home educating for academic excellence. I actually just got downright mean and insulted people when they dared ask dd anything about why she was not in school and whether she could multiply ...it was fun to hear her answer in Latin or run the Fibonacci sequence . To me, asking any question of a child when their parent is right there is frankly permission for me to be a jerk. I gladly accomodate. Someone else can be the positive hiney kissing face of giftedness. My leanings are for change and that means actively deterring others from handing their gifted students over to institutional schools period.Having bloviated well beyond the point at hand you must decide how you feel about giftedness and how you want your child to perceive him/herself. Is it a dark secret or talent ? If they were also gifted athletically you certainly would not hide it or suggest that your child hide their skills so as to not make others uncomfortable. The messages we can send as parents can be very foundational and should be considered carefully.

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We've just taught our kids to answer with either their age or what grade level they'd be in if they were in school. Something like "if I were in school I would be in X grade". Most people are really interested in age anyway and how many kids (schooled or not, GT or not) are really working at a single grade level in every single area? If anyone expresses interest in knowing what our homeschooling days look like or what my kids are reading or working on, I'm more than happy to discuss it. I'm also happy to talk about why ended up choosing to homeschool after 2 years of public school.

 

It's kind of interesting. I have met some parents of GT kids that I knew we were speaking the same language or dealing with similar issues after just a few sentences.

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My boys just answer with what grade they would be in in ps. Never mind that they're all working at different grade levels depending upon the subject being studied.

 

Most people are just asking to be polite. What else do you ask a 5 year old? They don't necessarily want a rundown on every subject and all of Precious' test scores. :D

 

If you want to explain to your ds to just politely answer that he's in kindergarten, that's fine. :) If people are especially curious or maybe even just nosy they'll ask for more details and then you can turn him loose! :D

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I am planning on teaching my kids to say that they are in the grade that they would be in at school... I have battled with this for sometime and decided that this is best way for us to go. At church all of the Sunday School classes are split up by grade and I plan for her to stay with the kids she is with now (they are still grouped by age until K). So even though we are skipping K altogether, she will tell people she is in Kindergarten because that's the grade she'll be in at church.

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We are having a dilemma in our house. DS will be 5 in a couple of weeks and thus, would start K in the fall if in a public school.

 

However, when someone asks him what grade he is in, he responds either with 3rd or 4th grade :001_huh:. I know he is coming up with this answer because some of his books say 3rd or 4th grade on them and he has heard me discussing his reading level with the librarian when trying to find appropriate books for him to read.

 

I have tried to tell him to respond with 'I am homeschooled', but so far, that isn't working very well.:glare:

 

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

We say, "I am homeschooled" here. It generally gets the polite smile'n'nod combo that means, "I have nothing to say now that you have been revealed as weirdos."

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That is what I am talking about. Generally my attitude has been truth as those who are genuinely curious are often interested in hearing all about Latin, peyote weaving and whatever other passionate interest of the year has captivated dd. When they mutter oh and stumble around a bit for a response I know they are just trying to figure out just how smart dd is. Once they are taller and past puberty no one can guess their age so easily and life is certainly less combative on the social front . I have never disliked so many people in so many different places as when we were a younger family home educating for academic excellence. I actually just got downright mean and insulted people when they dared ask dd anything about why she was not in school and whether she could multiply ...it was fun to hear her answer in Latin or run the Fibonacci sequence . To me, asking any question of a child when their parent is right there is frankly permission for me to be a jerk. I gladly accomodate. Someone else can be the positive hiney kissing face of giftedness. My leanings are for change and that means actively deterring others from handing their gifted students over to institutional schools period.Having bloviated well beyond the point at hand you must decide how you feel about giftedness and how you want your child to perceive him/herself. Is it a dark secret or talent ? If they were also gifted athletically you certainly would not hide it or suggest that your child hide their skills so as to not make others uncomfortable. The messages we can send as parents can be very foundational and should be considered carefully.

 

:lol:

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We say, "I am homeschooled" here. It generally gets the polite smile'n'nod combo that means, "I have nothing to say now that you have been revealed as weirdos."

 

:iagree:This is SOOO true!! My ds is actually glad he is done hsing, because we have moved so much with the military that he gets tired of being singled out as "that hsed kid" until everyone (meaning his peers) can figure out that he is perfectly normal! My 4yo ds already responds to the question about school (grade and where she goes) that she is hsed. That always gets the "smile/nod", lol! :D

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That is what I am talking about. Generally my attitude has been truth as those who are genuinely curious are often interested in hearing all about Latin, peyote weaving and whatever other passionate interest of the year has captivated dd. When they mutter oh and stumble around a bit for a response I know they are just trying to figure out just how smart dd is. Once they are taller and past puberty no one can guess their age so easily and life is certainly less combative on the social front . I have never disliked so many people in so many different places as when we were a younger family home educating for academic excellence. I actually just got downright mean and insulted people when they dared ask dd anything about why she was not in school and whether she could multiply ...it was fun to hear her answer in Latin or run the Fibonacci sequence . To me, asking any question of a child when their parent is right there is frankly permission for me to be a jerk. I gladly accomodate. Someone else can be the positive hiney kissing face of giftedness. My leanings are for change and that means actively deterring others from handing their gifted students over to institutional schools period.Having bloviated well beyond the point at hand you must decide how you feel about giftedness and how you want your child to perceive him/herself. Is it a dark secret or talent ? If they were also gifted athletically you certainly would not hide it or suggest that your child hide their skills so as to not make others uncomfortable. The messages we can send as parents can be very foundational and should be considered carefully.

 

This a valid point as well:) You are right that people do not hide athletic abilities so why hide intellectual abilities?

 

OTOH, I dance a dance with this with ds since he is running into kids being annoyed with him for being a "know-it-all." :( I tell my son to try to talk about what the other kids are interested in such as Star Wars and what not since most of them are not interested in quarks and particles and mythology and so and so on. I encourage him not to raise his hand repeatedly to give other kids a chance. I encourage him not to tell them all he knows and instead tell momma and papa. I tell him that learning is good and that there are other kids out there like him and that he will meet more of them as he gets older:) It is a fine line as I do not want him to think that learning is bad. I am just trying to encourage him not to broadcast everything he knows. I hope I am handling this correctly for my son:)

 

It is a sad commentary on our society that learning and studying is not valued that much as compared to other cultures:( I read an article in the NYTimes on Chinese teachers who teaching over here and it is a culture shock for them as our students tend to not value studying:(It is sad that people look down on education and smarts as elitist as I have heard from people in the national limelight:( Too bad I feel like I do have to hide smarts a little bit:(

 

Any thoughts?

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This a valid point as well:) You are right that people do not hide athletic abilities so why hide intellectual abilities?

 

OTOH, I dance a dance with this with ds since he is running into kids being annoyed with him for being a "know-it-all." :( I tell my son to try to talk about what the other kids are interested in such as Star Wars and what not since most of them are not interested in quarks and particles and mythology and so and so on. I encourage him not to raise his hand repeatedly to give other kids a chance. I encourage him not to tell them all he knows and instead tell momma and papa. I tell him that learning is good and that there are other kids out there like him and that he will meet more of them as he gets older:) It is a fine line as I do not want him to think that learning is bad. I am just trying to encourage him not to broadcast everything he knows. I hope I am handling this correctly for my son:)

 

It is a sad commentary on our society that learning and studying is not valued that much as compared to other cultures:( I read an article in the NYTimes on Chinese teachers who teaching over here and it is a culture shock for them as our students tend to not value studying:(It is sad that people look down on education and smarts as elitist as I have heard from people in the national limelight:( Too bad I feel like I do have to hide smarts a little bit:(

 

Any thoughts?

 

 

The above is among the primary reasons I abandoned my career to educate my children. The de-prioritization of education, academic rigor, and intelligence in general is rampant. People who continue to prioritize these things are going to stand out in a culture that is largely defined by athletics and entertainment. At the very least, these are more highly valued than education. Even in those instances where education is viewed as important, it seems to be valued purely as a means to an end, which often results in reducing the whole endeavor to skills training.

 

Regardless of what my children say or do with respect to others, it is obvious they are different. I have three children with vastly different responses to people, at least in their manner of presentation. I let them alone to respond as they desire, provided they demonstrate respect for others at all times. Notwithstanding the necessity of common courtesy, children should not be expected to apologize for their abilities nor should they be required to consider the feelings of others to the extent that they are not allowed to be themselves. There needs to be balance.

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It is a sad commentary on our society that learning and studying is not valued that much as compared to other cultures:( I read an article in the NYTimes on Chinese teachers who teaching over here and it is a culture shock for them as our students tend to not value studying:(It is sad that people look down on education and smarts as elitist as I have heard from people in the national limelight:( Too bad I feel like I do have to hide smarts a little bit:(

 

Any thoughts?

 

:iagree:

 

Regardless of what my children say or do with respect to others, it is obvious they are different. I have three children with vastly different responses to people, at least in their manner of presentation. I let them alone to respond as they desire, provided they demonstrate respect for others at all times. Notwithstanding the necessity of common courtesy, children should not be expected to apologize for their abilities nor should they be required to consider the feelings of others to the extent that they are not allowed to be themselves. There needs to be balance.

 

I think maybe you need to know your audience to some extent. The lady at the Walmart counter is being polite and couldn't care less. Grandma wants every detail of what is being learned. The kids and parents at the park fall somewhere in between. It seems you find out after about 2 sentences whether they want to hear more about where your kids are at. In some ways, this is no different than sports. The mom whose son didn't make the basketball team doesn't want to hear how your son scored 22 points and had 18 blocks in last night's game. It seems like we worry about it more though. Sport mom says too bad for you - but my son is awesome. Academic mom says I don't want to hurt their feelings I will shut up now. Hmm, does seem like an unfair double standard as I write it out.

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Yes... why is it that we don't want to "brag" about our kids' educational gifts the same way moms of sports/music/art gifted kids do? I have a friend with a very musically gifted son and I love hearing that he finished book X of Suzuki, and truly enjoy watching videos of him playing. I have another fried who proudly posts photos of her DD's artwork to her blog, and it is great. Sports moms don't think twice about posting how many goals their child scored (and we all respond with "YAY! That is awesome!").

 

So why do I not feel comfortable posting about the GREAT math score G received yesterday? Math has been a struggle for him and for 2 years I haven't felt confident in how I have been teaching him, and no matter what program we tried he hated it. I was so worried, so when I got his WJ results back yesterday and saw that he actually scored at X grade level, I wanted to shout from the rooftops (see... I don't even feel comfortable sharing it here, because that elusive *someone* might see it). He worked hard all year on math, I wish someone besides Dad and me were patting him on the back.

 

To the original poster:

I have taught my children to respond with "I am third grade age." Someone who just wants to know how old they are will leave it at that. If someone is curious enough to inquire "Why third grade AGE?" then my child will say "I am homeschooled, so we don't really have grade levels." For someone who really wants to know what my child is studying (and truthfully, this is like 2 or 3 people EVER that we have met), I have told my son that he can choose what information he feels comfortable sharing based on who/where. Really... nobody (as in anyone who asks "what grade are you in?") CARES what grade level my son is working at in various subjects unless they are wanting to compare it to their own kid, and we don't play that game.

Edited by Colleen in SEVA
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It is a sad commentary on our society that learning and studying is not valued that much as compared to other cultures:( I read an article in the NYTimes on Chinese teachers who teaching over here and it is a culture shock for them as our students tend to not value studying:(It is sad that people look down on education and smarts as elitist as I have heard from people in the national limelight:( Too bad I feel like I do have to hide smarts a little bit:(

 

Any thoughts?

 

We are well aware of the Chinese culture as DS is adopted from China. No, I don't want to hide how intelligent he is, but we have already run into people who 'wink' and say, "Well, you know the Chinese are so much smarter than anyone else" - thus perpetuating that myth.

 

I really like the suggestions of responding with age and homeschooled. If the person presses the issue, DS can hold his own :D as he so 'politely' did today in Lowe's. After being asked why he wasn't in school by the garden lady, I responded that we homeschool. DS promptly pointed to some of the hanging plants and proceeded to give a narrative on Nebuchadnezzar and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon:svengo:.

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I really like the suggestions of responding with age and homeschooled. If the person presses the issue, DS can hold his own :D as he so 'politely' did today in Lowe's. After being asked why he wasn't in school by the garden lady, I responded that we homeschool. DS promptly pointed to some of the hanging plants and proceeded to give a narrative on Nebuchadnezzar and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon:svengo:.

 

:thumbup: ROFL! I love it. I find with my own kids too, it only takes a few sentences out of their mouths and people can kind of get a feel for them and why maybe school might not be the best fit for them. So we go with the simple answer most of the time. Especially somewhere like Lowe's.

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So why do I not feel comfortable posting about the GREAT math score G received yesterday? Math has been a struggle for him and for 2 years I haven't felt confident in how I have been teaching him, and no matter what program we tried he hated it. I was so worried, so when I got his WJ results back yesterday and saw that he actually scored at X grade level, I wanted to shout from the rooftops (see... I don't even feel comfortable sharing it here, because that elusive *someone* might see it). He worked hard all year on math, I wish someone besides Dad and me were patting him on the back.

 

Go ahead and share it here! I personally am thrilled to hear about the interests and achievements of kids! :001_smile: From time to time, I notice posts by different "someones" ... who cares? We need to be able to share their accomplishments somewhere. Why not here?

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The above is among the primary reasons I abandoned my career to educate my children. The de-prioritization of education, academic rigor, and intelligence in general is rampant. People who continue to prioritize these things are going to stand out in a culture that is largely defined by athletics and entertainment. At the very least, these are more highly valued than education. Even in those instances where education is viewed as important, it seems to be valued purely as a means to an end, which often results in reducing the whole endeavor to skills training.

 

Regardless of what my children say or do with respect to others, it is obvious they are different. I have three children with vastly different responses to people, at least in their manner of presentation. I let them alone to respond as they desire, provided they demonstrate respect for others at all times. Notwithstanding the necessity of common courtesy, children should not be expected to apologize for their abilities nor should they be required to consider the feelings of others to the extent that they are not allowed to be themselves. There needs to be balance.

 

:iagree: I still run into problems though even though we do public school at home:( I do not think I will ever find a suitable school besides public school at home or homeschooling which I think is next on the agenda until he is ready for college:D Hopefully we will find a happy balance for ds so that he will not come off as a "know-it-all." I must say that it is a bit discouraging how much learning is devalued:(

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I really like the suggestions of responding with age and homeschooled. If the person presses the issue, DS can hold his own :D as he so 'politely' did today in Lowe's. After being asked why he wasn't in school by the garden lady, I responded that we homeschool. DS promptly pointed to some of the hanging plants and proceeded to give a narrative on Nebuchadnezzar and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon:svengo:.

 

:lol:

 

We had this today in Barnes and Noble. Bless the clerk's heart. She asked dd how old she was (dd is really tiny for her age). Then she proceeded to ask what grade dd was in. DDs response: "In what subject??" :D

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Yes... why is it that we don't want to "brag" about our kids' educational gifts the same way moms of sports/music/art gifted kids do?

 

In general this is a misconception. Parents of musically gifted kids feel the way parents of academically gifted kids feel: they can't brag. Don't want to step on toes -- And I know the parents of a very skilled basketball player here in our small town. If they talk about his talent AT ALL it is to brush away comments. (It's okay to be the best on the team as long as you're not LIGHT YEARS AHEAD of everyone else on the team.)

 

Dd is musically talented/advanced/whatever. Amazingly some people will get offended. I generally don't discuss it with others.

Ds is quite talented when it comes to drawing. Others have remarked about it since he was very young. I LOVE looking at his artwork. I don't EVER bring it up in conversation, though.

 

I have a friend with a very musically gifted son and I love hearing that he finished book X of Suzuki, and truly enjoy watching videos of him playing. I have another fried who proudly posts photos of her DD's artwork to her blog, and it is great. Sports moms don't think twice about posting how many goals their child scored (and we all respond with "YAY! That is awesome!").

 

I don't think posting about a child's accomplishments on a blog is the same as bragging. I think we're "supposed to" write about what our kids do when we blog. Right?

 

Really... nobody (as in anyone who asks "what grade are you in?") CARES what grade level my son is working at in various subjects unless they are wanting to compare it to their own kid, and we don't play that game.

 

I think this is it. Spot on. We don't announce our child's talents because we don't want others to play the comparison game. It's surprising to me that so many parents will automatically compare their own kids to what they hear others doing -- and either end up feeling like they've fallen short or begin to feel superior in some way.

 

Why can't we all just enjoy the successes of other children? Our kids don't HAVE to be able to do what every other child can do. Each child has their own strengths and weaknesses -- their own interests and their own style. I know, I know -- I'm preaching to the choir! :001_smile:

Edited by zaichiki
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DS promptly pointed to some of the hanging plants and proceeded to give a narrative on Nebuchadnezzar and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon:svengo:.

 

Now see -- that's awesome! Seriously, I think that is wonderfully cute. I would have LOVED to have listened to him!

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Guest Dulcimeramy
That is what I am talking about. Generally my attitude has been truth as those who are genuinely curious are often interested in hearing all about Latin, peyote weaving and whatever other passionate interest of the year has captivated dd. When they mutter oh and stumble around a bit for a response I know they are just trying to figure out just how smart dd is. Once they are taller and past puberty no one can guess their age so easily and life is certainly less combative on the social front . I have never disliked so many people in so many different places as when we were a younger family home educating for academic excellence. I actually just got downright mean and insulted people when they dared ask dd anything about why she was not in school and whether she could multiply ...it was fun to hear her answer in Latin or run the Fibonacci sequence . To me, asking any question of a child when their parent is right there is frankly permission for me to be a jerk. I gladly accomodate. Someone else can be the positive hiney kissing face of giftedness. My leanings are for change and that means actively deterring others from handing their gifted students over to institutional schools period.Having bloviated well beyond the point at hand you must decide how you feel about giftedness and how you want your child to perceive him/herself. Is it a dark secret or talent ? If they were also gifted athletically you certainly would not hide it or suggest that your child hide their skills so as to not make others uncomfortable. The messages we can send as parents can be very foundational and should be considered carefully.

 

This was extremely satisfying to read! Post of the day.

 

My oldest son has been opted out of all leveling programs (Sunday school, etc.), because I just could not keep having this conversation in my own head.

 

What grade is he in? He's Nathaniel. Full stop. Get to know him, and you'll see that this is a totally irrelevant question. You'll also see that he's a pretty neat kid with knack for finding common ground with you and everyone else he meets. It is enough.

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I've taught my kids that when someone asks what grade they are in, they really mean to ask how old they are. So, I've told them to respond with the grade that corresponds with their age. For some reason I can never remember what grade my oldest should be in. LOL

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I've taught my kids that when someone asks what grade they are in, they really mean to ask how old they are. So, I've told them to respond with the grade that corresponds with their age.

 

Why not just respond withh their age, if that's what the person wants to know?

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FOr what it is worth, we found we had to accelerate in Sunday School classes after a point, too. Both of my older two ended up taking adult ss classes sometime in high school. The high school classes were too elementary for them. Obviously, they did not take classes like Christian Marriage or something like that but did take classes like going over a book of the Bible, Parables, Islam, Elementary Church Greek, etc.

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I just asked ds6 about this. He said people ask him his grade all the time, and he just tells them he is homeschooled. He said they don't ask him anymore after that, because obviously they know he doesn't have a grade.:D

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My kids would just respond with the grade level I tell them they are in. They are in grades according to their ages (Kindergarten and grade 2). The work they do has nothing to do with the grade they are in. I have one child that is doing grade level work a couple years ahead of his grade and another child that is all over the place (11 grade level span of skills).

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We tried the age grade thing and my oldest felt like he was lying (at age 5). I tried to explain that they just want to know what grade he'd be in if he was in ps to which he said, "That's ridiculous, I wouldn't be in ps. I'd be in college." (Of course that wasn't exactly true.)

 

Now days (age 10) when he get's "What grade are you in?" he answers, "What do you mean?" Because he likes to instigate things.

 

In our area many kids who are "homeschooled" are actually just public schooled at home... so saying he's homeschooled doesn't stop the question..."yes, but what grade?"

 

Just last week the guy next to us at the Chiropractors office asked this lovely question. I liked ds's newest answer... "Well, my input level is teetering on college level but my output is upper middle to high school level. Except for my math skills which I find more challenging." The guy just sat there with his mouth gaping.

 

This same guy was really cruising for a mental bruising because he then asked him if he was socialized. At this my son laughed and said, "No I'm more of a capitalist." Too bad the guy didn't get my son's joke. His wife got the joke though and I could hear her teasing him all the way down the hall when they left. :lol:

 

My youngest son 5 now prefers to say, "School what's that?" :lol: laughing hysterically at his inside joke.

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I liked ds's newest answer... "Well, my input level is teetering on college level but my output is upper middle to high school level. Except for my math skills which I find more challenging."

 

:lol::lol: That is my DS! He just needs a couple more years of maturity and then he will be the smarty pants with a comment along those lines.

 

I love it!!!!

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This same guy was really cruising for a mental bruising because he then asked him if he was socialized. At this my son laughed and said, "No I'm more of a capitalist."

 

:lol::lol::lol: You have to love their sense of humor! It keeps us ROFL all the time!

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