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If you school on a light schedule in the summer, what do you do?


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Do you just pick up with next year's curriculum and go with it, albeit at a slower/lighter pace? Or do you work on things you don't have much time for on your regular schedule?

 

I'm trying to decide what to do this summer with my 1st grader. We will have a new baby by then, too, so that's a consideration.

 

I thought about just doing some FIAR books/lapbooking and maybe a few interest-led unit studies, all the while plodding along (more slowly, though) in reading/phonics instruction.

 

Math is another animal entirely. I don't *think* I want to start next year's curriculum, but I want to do something to keep her thinking math. Any suggestions?:)

 

Thanks!

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When mine were that young we did FIAR for K the whole year, and I still go back and take "breaks" from the heavier academics with FIAR. My boys love this curriculum, plus they think of it as getting off from school:lol: We have also done art, a language (spanish) since we have more time. I also take advantage of free time and try to do some of those field trips we never get to during the year.

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We usually just do the basics during the summer. We are never done that year's books so there isn't a question about starting next year's books. :D I always have great plans of doing some fun units on history or science for the summer but that never happens. We just stick with the basics.

 

If you don't want to start next year's math book, you can always take a living math approach with games and books to keep him limber in math over the summer.

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My plan (moving from K to 1st in the fall)

 

1) Reading-we have the library used book sale this weekend, and I have a LONG list of books I'm hoping to stock the house with, along with the Sonlight book list I've already purchased for next year. We'll do the library book club. She's thrilled that she's actually able to be in the real book club this year instead of the preschool one.

 

2) PE-T-ball in June, swim lessons and regular swimming, a week of dance camp in the mornings, a week of cheer/tumbling camp, and lots of running around outside...I figure that this will help make up for next year where PE will probably be a couple of ballet and maybe a tumbling class each week ;).

 

3) Science-since we're doing nature study and life science, it simply doesn't make sense to wait until fall when there's so much to observe NOW. In fact, we've already started.

 

4) Math-I'm not planning on being formal and moving on in Singapore over the summer, but I want to firm up those number bonds and facts using C-rods and just generally play games and explore in a fun way.

 

5) Geography-Since we have two trips planned this summer, we'll map those and work some on map skills.

 

6) Foreign language-I have the Song School Latin CD and some Spanish CDs on my Mp3 player for Carschooling. I may need a new Latin program before fall-she's picking up on SSL really quickly.

 

7) Everything else-we have several museum trips, science center trips, and such things planned as part of our summer travels. I'm especially excited about visiting an Ancient Egypt exhibit, since we're doing Ancients next year.

 

8) Art-all the messy, paint and glue stuff works SO well when we can do it on the screened back porch instead of inside ;).

 

Once school officially starts here for her friends, we'll get out the more formal books (which, at age 5 is a pretty big deal) and do "school" more regularly. We'll also, hopefully, have our "school room" ready by then (we're remodeling the upstairs now into an office/guest room combo) so I'll have all my math manipulatives, games, a large chalkboard, books, piano, greenhouse frame and so on in one place, with room to spread out and leave projects up over several days or weeks. Oh, and I guess I should include a desk for DD in there somewhere....

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For a first grader, I would just make sure to do math at least 2x/week to make sure that she doesn't lose what she's learned. I'd also keep going through a reading program of some type at least 2x/week (or just have her read to me).

 

I can even see watching and episode of Cyberchase and an episode of Between the Lions 2-3 days/week and calling it done. Those shows will keep her thinking about math and reading without involving much on your part.

 

We keep going with formal school through the summer, but my kids are much older. Our summer schedule is a lot lighter though. As soon as we finish what I had planned for history and science, I drop those subjects. As soon as we finish the writing program, we drop that too.

 

My 11th grader's summer:

finish precalculus - will probably take the whole summer

finish physics - will probably take the whole summer

take digital imaging class at community college (her choice of class)

 

My 9th grader's summer:

finish biology - will probably take the whole summer

keep going in math - will finish geometry in two more weeks and then move on to Algebra II

Visual Link Spanish for 30 minutes/day for exposure to Spanish

Python programming for 30 minutes/day

 

My 6th grader's summer

math - 30 minutes/day

finish history - will only take a few weeks

free reading required each day for at least one hour

spelling daily - but this takes less than 10 minutes each day

Edited by AngieW in Texas
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We did SOTW and Science once a week last summer, and will again this summer. SOTW because there are so many chapters that I can't finish it in a 10 month school year, and I want to start the new vol. for the beginning of school in Aug! And science, because there is always something to learn. Last year we did a unit on insects over the summer break (for us only 8 wks anyway.)

 

Then we join reading programs at the library, bookstores, and zoo and log our reading for prizes. This keeps them reading. And I let them pick a "fun" workbook from the store. They work on these whenever they want, plus on car rides, and once a week or so at home when I tell them to. Last year my 6 yr old chose the Complete Book of Dinosaurs which has all kinds of skills centered around dinos, and my 5 yr old picked an all in one K one and a Disney princess math one. Both of these she still uses throughout the year too.

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We'll continue reading aloud (we will have finished 1st grade) and I'll probably do so math review work. I've been eyeing BJU's Vacation Stations. I wish I could get my hands on one and see if they're worth the money. Anyone have any experience with these?

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It's hard, when the weather is nice, to keep them sitting and doing bookwork (unless it's outside ;)).

 

My plan for this summer is to continue drilling math facts and "playing" with c-rods. My dd9 will learn to touch-type. And I really want to do a special summer-long unit study in Geology. (I bought WinterPromise's Rock Around the Earth for last fall and we haven't gotten to it yet. :001_rolleyes:) My kids have been chomping at the bit because it looks so fun. And then, of course, I'll keep them reading with frequent trips to the library. Nothing too structured, though.

 

I take intentional breaks from math books, grammar and spelling, composition, etc.

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We are going to keep going with math, probably 3-4 days, do the summer reading program at the library and study Greek Mythology. I was thinking about using Memoria Press's study, but decided it was too much. At the HS convention, I bought all of Jim Weiss's mythology CD's and we're going to look at mythology in art and create a big family tree of the Gods. I'm planning on doing it during the evening a few nights a week, so we can still horse around during the day. It should be a bit more fun - I hope!

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We usually start science in the summer. Last summer we did some home ec, science, reading (of course), and geography.

 

This summer, I plan on starting science. Each dc must read something every day and write something every day. We also want to finish a quilt.

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This is my first year homeschooling, but we are planning on reading, writing and math. We are also doing a unit study on dinosaurs (picked by the kids). They are really looking forward to it and cannot wait for summer school to start.

 

Michelle

Homeschooling 2 great boys ages 6 and 3

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We do the basic 2-3 days week around 1 hour day. Reading, math, handwriting, and phonics.

 

This year we will finish up math which we slowed way down on this year. Practice the addition facts with games. Work on telling time and money.

 

Reading, phonics and read out louds. We are going to do a lapbook on lady bugs and just kind of go with the flow and see what catches the kids attention this year.

 

Would like to just do nothing for the summer:tongue_smilie:but I know I would regret it in Sept. So thats not an option!

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We keep going with math. For Spanish we're going to do the Unitedstreaming Middle School videos and reinforcement lessons in prep for Spanish II in the fall. We also do a Hogwarts Summer Correspondence School. This summer we're also doing IEW. We do a more relaxed school.

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My plan is to school year round. In July we do a light amount of work then we take off the whole month of August before our new school year in September. So July will be a bit of math (either games or a worksheet) a few times a week, we'll finish up OPG, and we'll probably finish up the last few lessons in spelling. We're doing an animal study too because I want to study them when we can find them (we're starting with invertebrates) and TJ wants to continue doing history so we'll probably do that but I'm not concerned about missing a week or so.

 

In August I'll still have her do some math a few times a week and we'll continue our science plans.

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Here's what I've done for several summers...Hogwarts Summer School of Correspondence!

 

FOR PARENTS & EDUCATORS ONLY. A group for homeschooling parents who would like to provide a fun and educational experience for their kids during the summer in the form of the (fictitious) Hogwarts Summer Correspondence School. A place to exchange ideas and share activities related to the Harry Potter Books.

 

HogwartsSCS-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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It sort of depends.

 

For math we just keep going, possibly at half strength. Latin is just vocabulary and grammar maintenance, without adding anything new. I also use the summer to finish things like science and history if necessary.

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Reading (ds can do "free" reading, dd needs some work still)

Math games

And I am going to read The American Story (Maestro) out loud, since we're nowhere near American History in our history cycle, and I want them to have some familarity with it.

Plus, I'll continue reading aloud a lot anyhow... thinking Swallows and Amazons this summer.

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My upcoming 4th and 5th grader are excellant readers. So I just make sure to visit the library or the book store often for reading. My upcoming 2nd grade ds has not been bitten by the reading for pleasure bug yet. So we are continuing reading with him.

We took the CAT test and everyone did well, but all of the kid's lowest scores were in math computation. So we are doing 10 weeks of math for summer "school" to hopefully cement those pesky math facts.

So really the only "school" planned is math for all of them and reading/phonics for my ds.

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We do extra in the summer. (unless they need catching up in certain areas) which they will this year because I didnt have everything until November this year :blushing: We do MEP math over the summer, (my oldest will do LOF and Survival math over this summer) We are doing botany this summer and the insects chapter of Apologia Zoology 1 with alot of nature journaling. We do world history all summer (we have to catch up in the cycle and do 4 books in 3 years so summers are an easy way to do it so its not overwhelming.) My dd 2nd will continue with handwriting over the summer. Now that being said we dont do it ALL every day. We will so 2, MAYBE 3 subjects 5days a week, but shortened lessons. Keeps them fresh :D

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If I had a new baby, I wouldn't feel obliged to do anything beyond the usual reading with/to the other kids.:001_smile:

 

Since I don't have a new baby:tongue_smilie:, we will be doing a great geography curriculum that we don't have time for this year. I will also be working with ds1 on getting caught up with math, which will take all summer. We will be finishing up WWE2 with him the first couple of weeks of summer. Ds2 is ahead of schedule and will likely finish up his math and grammar before summer begins.

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We have used and will continue to use the summer to practice math facts using games and such. I typically even grab a different brand of curriculum's WB to futz with. Each curriculum approaches math a little differently and focuses on different aspects. By using another brand, ultimately my kids are getting a very solid foundation in mathematics to prepare them for higher level math later on. In the end, my kids end up doing 2 math curriculums a year - the summer one always goes a lot faster because it is more review than learning.

 

We also do a lot more fun reading together.

 

We also use the summer to do art classes, miscellaneous camps, etc.

 

I hope this helps!

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Math is another animal entirely. I don't *think* I want to start next year's curriculum, but I want to do something to keep her thinking math. Any suggestions?:)

 

Thanks!

 

 

If you do not do MEP through the school year I would recommend that! Print the practice books and just read the lesson plans online! Also math drills are great through the summer! You can get those at almost ANY store! (sams club has a bunch right now) a teacher supply store, bookstore! Walmart :D

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With dd5, we will continue FIAR through the summer until we start 1st grade. I am putting together a bunch of fun math games to help her keep up on the math she has learned. (Computer & internet games, and we will play "store" to help her learn to count money) I will have her do copywork 2x per week to keep up on handwriting. I didn't do any writing last summer, and she forgot much of what she had learned, so we are going to keep up on it this time and make it very light. And she will continue to read to me (or dad) at least a few times per week. That is all we are doing. The goal is just to not lose what we learned throughout the year.

 

Tracy

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We don't continue any "sit at the table and do school", but we do keep on with school in a more flexible and less formal way (even though most would think we're pretty informal all the time:001_smile:). Our math curriculum is Math On The Level, with lots of Living Math readers. We will keep that, but not do any of the paper problems like we do now a few days a week. We finished up Apologia Astronomy and will start Noeo Science Biology 1 next year, but we already have the books and my boys ask me to read them quite a bit. We'll do them again in a more structured way next fall, but for now and the summer we do a LOT of outside stuff (most would call it "Nature Study", but it's just what we do all the time since we live in the Alaskan bush and are outside most of the time we're awake. Right now we're collecting birch sap. Birds are beginning to fly in and many nest in our yard. We have frequent earthquakes, and there's an active volcano not too far away that sometimes drops a little ash on us. We have a garden, we pick lots of wild plants for food and herbal medicines, so my boys know all the useful plants as well as the poisonous ones. So, there's lots of natural science that goes on around us all the time for perfect learning experiences.

 

We also continue with reading practice, but not formally. We are using TruthQuest History and have lots of wonderful biographies and books about historical events. We always keep two read alouds going --- one during the day and one at bedtime. Usually one is a literature selection and the other is history, but not always. During the school year, we are more diligent with the readings than we are during the summer. I don't continue much handwriting during the summer, except what they want to do. I don't discourage it, but I don't require it, either.

 

So, in a nutshell, we continue just about everything, but in an even more natural way than we do the rest of the year.

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For my little man finishing up 1st grade we are going to work through Miquon Math all summer since we went with the orange book and a lot of it is quite easy once he looks at how it wants him to think. We will also continue to read all summer....

My bigger guy is going into 6th grade and is in public school (but that might change this year) and during the summer we are working on a First Aid course for kids and we are also working out way through "Building Thinking Skills". I really want to use the summers to concentrate on living skills instead of strong academics. But with a ton of camping, sports, and activities thrown in for good measure.

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Math - they must do 1-2 pages of CLE math daily (although this year my DD will be using Key To Decimals because she needs extra practice there.)

 

We ususally do a few FIAR unit studies/lapbooks and the rest is nature studies: gardening (botany,) stargazing ( astronomy), and we usually order caterpillars and watch them change to butterflies (entomology.)

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In the past we have done a math lesson 2 days a week, 30 min of independent reading daily and piano practice daily. I really try to get 3 math lessons done a week and daily journal writing, but that doesn't seem to ever happen. My dc are on a swimming league in the summer, and it takes up a lot of time each day. Oh, one year I put together a packet of math fun sheets I copied from the internet or The Teacher's Mailbox and just had them work through them at their leisure through the summer. They did have to be completed before we started formal schooling back up though.

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For summer, we usually work on finishing up some of the things we didn't get finished during the year (like his Singapore math wkbk) We're usually pretty close to done. He continues with Kumon math and Piano lessons year round. We'll read a lot and throw in more activities such as science experiments or maybe that Medieval Castle project we never got around to. We also spend more time at the park doing physical activities, and usually have swimming lessons and an occasional day camp. This year we'll probably work on spelling thru the summer because this is something he really wants to work on. I may throw in an occasional LA or Critical Thinking wkbk page just for kicks and to keep up the skills.

 

It sounds like a lot, but the only things we do regularly are Kumon, Piano, Spelling & Swimming. They don't take up much of the day at all. The rest comes as we get to it. Some days we won't do anything else. We're very relaxed during the summer months. Ds reads on his own a lot now, so I probably won't schedule that either.

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My kids are a bit older, so I'll suggest what I'd do with a 1st grader--read, take nature walks, and enjoy your new baby!

 

We take a "living" approach to math, and there are plenty of picture books and early readers that you can enjoy to explore math concepts. The card game 'War' can be played in many different ways. Check out this link:

 

http://letsplaymath.net/2006/12/29/the-game-that-is-worth-1000-worksheets/

 

And here's a site with some cool virtual math manipulatives:

 

http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/vlibrary.html

 

Bake cookies (measurements, fractions), use blocks or Legos to investigate shapes or practice sorting and patterns, fill up jars with beads or small colored candies and practice estimation. Just some thoughts off the top of my head. Check out the list of living math books here:

 

http://www.livingmath.net/ReaderLists/tabid/268/language/en-US/Default.aspx

 

Enjoy! And best wishes with the new baby.

Nancy in NH

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