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"Has your governess left you?"


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"We never had any governess."

"No governess! How was that possible? Five daughters brought up at home without a governess! I never heard of such a thing. Your mother must have been quite a slave to your education."

Elizabeth could hardly help smiling, as she assured her that had not been the case.

"Then, who taught you? Who attended to you? Without a governesss you must have been neglected."

"Compared with some families, I believe we were; but such as us as wished to learn never wanted the means. We were always encouraged to read, and had all the masters that were necessary. Those who chose to be idle, certainly might."

 

Soo.... my favorite heroine was unschooled. I think she turned out rather well, as did three of her four sisters. The fourth was a bad seed.:tongue_smilie:

 

Just a funny.

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Soo.... my favorite heroine was unschooled. I think she turned out rather well, as did three of the four sisters. The fourth was a bad seed.:tongue_smilie:

 

Just a funny.

 

The eldest two educated themselves; the youngest went wild and led the second youngest astray. The second youngest was then taken in hand - no more unschooling for her!

 

I like how in Sense and Sensibility the horrid brother went to public (private) school and the nice brother was educated 'privately' (i.e. he lived in his tutor's house). The latter was the closest to home education that upper middle class boys were allowed.

 

Laura

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What a fun discovery!

 

Not the same level but I suspect Jack and Annie from The Magic Treehouse series are homeschooled. How else could they have all those adventures in the middle of the day?

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"We never had any governess."

"No governess! How was that possible? Five daughters brought up at home without a governess! I never heard of such a thing. Your mother must have been quite a slave to your education."

Elizabeth could hardly help smiling, as she assured her that had not been the case.

"Then, who taught you? Who attended to you? Without a governesss you must have been neglected."

"Compared with some families, I believe we were; but such as us as wished to learn never wanted the means. We were always encouraged to read, and had all the masters that were necessary. Those who chose to be idle, certainly might."

 

Soo.... my favorite heroine was unschooled. I think she turned out rather well, as did three of her four sisters. The fourth was a bad seed.:tongue_smilie:

 

Just a funny.

 

Well, the middle sister needed some socialization, don't you think?

 

:leaving:

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The eldest two educated themselves; the youngest went wild and led the second youngest astray. The second youngest was then taken in hand - no more unschooling for her!

 

I like how in Sense and Sensibility the horrid brother went to public (private) school and the nice brother was educated 'privately' (i.e. he lived in his tutor's house). The latter was the closest to home education that upper middle class boys were allowed.

 

Laura

 

Well, the eldest three educated themselves. And although Kitty later was taken in hand, I think it was more with regards to moral instruction rather than academic.

 

JA had an interesting attitute toward education. The way she describes the school that Emma's little friend Harriet attends, Emma's (dominate) relationship with Miss Taylor, Catherine's mom (Northanger) struggles to teach all her children. She obviously valued it, but also thought moral and academic instruction where quite different animals. People could be intelligent, well educated but quite stupid as well. Clever but not wise. It was a continuing theme, I think.

 

:001_smile:

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Great thread!

 

I often think of Jane Austen's world while doing our mapwork.

 

In the BBC version of Sense & Sensibility, young Margaret is memorizing her timeline of Kings of England. I have pointed that out to my dd as she memorizes her timeline. :001_smile:

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The eldest two educated themselves; the youngest went wild and led the second youngest astray. The second youngest was then taken in hand - no more unschooling for her!

 

I like how in Sense and Sensibility the horrid brother went to public (private) school and the nice brother was educated 'privately' (i.e. he lived in his tutor's house). The latter was the closest to home education that upper middle class boys were allowed.

 

Laura

 

There was a lovely series in Germany along the lines of BBC's 1900 house. Except the chose people who really were experienced in the field they were being placed in. (For example, the housekeeper was a well known chef and the head groom was already familiar with horses.)

 

The house had was a large country house on a small estate. What I loved was when they brought in the tutor. There was a school room on one of the upper floors with a chalkboard, a desk for the tutor and smaller desks for the children. Quite cute, although I'd have trouble fitting my books in. (For a while I did gaze longingly at the 2 bedroom rental next to our house and wonder if it would make a nice school house for us.)

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I love that line. It's such a great "tell" on Lady Catherine's snobbery.

 

Not the same level but I suspect Jack and Annie from The Magic Treehouse series are homeschooled. How else could they have all those adventures in the middle of the day?

 

I have thought this before with my heroine in the novel I am writing. I've debated what her schooling circumstance should be, because I feel like I'm taking an "easy out" to make her homeschooled. But homeschooling works because otherwise, you have to squeeze adventures in during the summer. Or else they have to go to boarding school a la Harry Potter.

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Since I do not play piano and my name is Katherine, I tease my pianist daughter with this all of the time:

 

``What is that you are saying, Fitzwilliam? What is it you are talking of? What are you telling Miss Bennet? Let me hear what it is.''

 

``We are speaking of music, Madam,'' said he, when no longer able to avoid a reply.

 

``Of music! Then pray speak aloud. It is of all subjects my delight. I must have my share in the conversation, if you are speaking of music. There are few people in England, I suppose, who have more true enjoyment of music than myself, or a better natural taste. If I had ever learnt, I should have been a great proficient. And so would Anne, if her health had allowed her to apply. I am confident that she would have performed delightfully. How does Georgiana get on, Darcy?''

 

Mr. Darcy spoke with affectionate praise of his sister's proficiency.

 

``I am very glad to hear such a good account of her,'' said Lady Catherine; ``and pray tell her from me, that she cannot expect to excel, if she does not practise a great deal.''

 

``I assure you, Madam,'' he replied, ``that she does not need such advice. She practises very constantly.''

 

``So much the better. It cannot be done too much; and when I next write to her, I shall charge her not to neglect it on any account. I often tell young ladies, that no excellence in music is to be acquired, without constant practice. I have told Miss Bennet several times, that she will never play really well, unless she practises more; and though Mrs. Collins has no instrument, she is very welcome, as I have often told her, to come to Rosings every day, and play on the piano forte in Mrs. Jenkinson's room. She would be in nobody's way, you know, in that part of the house.''

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