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Looking for fun, creative ways to teach math facts


Wildwood
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Having been through all of the options that were available to me 4 years ago, I found the Right Start Math card games to be the best bet. My now 11 yo is dyslexic and has ADHD so memorizing non-meaningful facts is incredibly difficult for her.

 

Using the right start math games and activities, that kid knew her 5+'s, her "=10's" like the back of her hand in no time. Using many of the math games -esp corners, improved her working memory dramatically.

 

Then when it came time to memorize multiplication facts and *nothing* else was working, she had immediate success with Memorize in Minutes: The Times Tables b/c it sets each fact to a story which gives it meaning thus making it easy to learn.

 

:)

k

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Peggy Kaye's Games For Math is full of all kinds of simple games for basic math facts. My daughter, an early math-o-phobe, used to request these, she liked them so much.

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Recently Doodle did math equations with a hopscotch grid that I drew for him on the driveway. He really likes using the chalk, so just writing equations for him on the drive way and having him go around and fill in the answers was a hit for him too. We play addition/subtraction bingo. I use the flash cards from him math program. He gives the answer and then marks his card. Once I used coins as bingo markers. He was allow to keep the coins that won the bingo. Today we used Hershey kisses (leftover Easter candy). He was allowed the eat the ones on the winning line. During the winter he got a big kick out of doing his math facts while on his bouncy ball. If he got the right answer, he could make a bounce towards me (he started from the opposite side of the family room).

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We have been enjoying the Right Start games.

 

A recent thrift-store find by Mrs Spy Car was a bunch of different domino sets. I did not know there were so many kinds. Anyway, these can be used to play "Addition War" (adding the two sides of each tile) or "Subtraction War."

 

Having dominoes with different arrays keeps the computations extra interesting.

 

Bill

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My daughter really likes the Giggle Facts games which are explicitly for teaching addition & subtraction facts. We have the Right Start games too, but she find them boring for some reason (they aren't graphically appealing like Giggle Facts, which is probably a big part of it). Lots of other people love them, however.

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We have been enjoying the Right Start games.

 

A recent thrift-store find by Mrs Spy Car was a bunch of different domino sets. I did not know there were so many kinds. Anyway, these can be used to play "Addition War" (adding the two sides of each tile) or "Subtraction War."

 

Having dominoes with different arrays keeps the computations extra interesting.

 

Bill

 

My mom taught my ds to play dominoes when he was about 5. He'd play with 4 adults when he would be at my parents. He learned a lot of math facts that way. (but don't tell him that)

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My mom taught my ds to play dominoes when he was about 5. He'd play with 4 adults when he would be at my parents. He learned a lot of math facts that way. (but don't tell him that)

 

I guess now that we have all these dominoes, we better learn some "real" domino games :lol:

 

I always knew there were "double-sixes", but "double-nines" and "double-twelves" were new to me.

 

Bill

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We've recently tried to add more math games into our day, too. Here are a couple of ideas we're using, but please understand that these ARE mostly for drilling. We use lots of manipulatives and just everyday around-the-house math for conceptual teaching.

 

(1) It's basically like the sidewalk chalk hopscotch game described above, but we play it indoors with a foam hopscotch board we picked up at Big Lots for next to nothing. LOVE the sidewalk chalk idea - I'll have to do that on a day when the weather's too gorgeous to stay inside!

 

(2) Go fish. We deal out flash cards and ask each other for whatever we have in our hands. For example, if dd has a 7-4 card, she'll say, "Do you have any 3's?" And if I have, for example, the 9-6 card, I'll give it to her.

 

(3) MATHO. (Yes, I'm a dork.) I just went into Word, made a table with 5 columns and 5 rows, added random numbers to the cells, and printed it out. I made 4 different cards (one for each member of the family). DD is the caller - she goes through her flash cards, and whatever the answer is, that's the number she calls out. If we have the number on our card, we cover it with a penny. I especially love this one because it has helped my 4yo dd with her number recognition.

 

(4) Flashback. DD has index cards with numbers on them. When I hold up a flash card, she flashes back the card that has the answer on it.

 

(5) Mother May I. We use the foam hopscotch pieces from #1, but we take them apart. (They fit together like a puzzle, and each piece is about a square foot. You could just as easily use pieces of paper with numbers on them.) I'll hold up a card (say 4+2) and dd will ask, "Mother, may I please go to number 6?" They especially love it when I say something like, "Only if you hop on one foot (or walk like an elephant, dance, crawl, tiptoe, take giant steps, etc.) while you go."

 

(6) Matching. I recently purchased some 10-sided dice from CBD for about $3 for this game. We lay all of our flash cards face up, then roll the dice. Whatever number we roll is our "answer" and we have to find a card with a math fact to match. Whoever has more cards at the end wins. I'm probably going to make a variation of this game where you don't use flash cards but instead roll the dice and make an equation to go with that answer. For example, if you roll a 10, you could say, "6 + 4." But if you roll 10 again, you can't use the same equation, so you'd have to know another way of making 10, such as 7 + 3 or 12 - 2, etc.

 

(7) Battle. Play like regular battle, but add the two players' cards together. If they add up to be an even number, dd keeps them; if they add up to be an odd number, I keep them.

 

Sorry to be so wordy - brevity is definitely NOT my gift! But I'm glad you started this thread! I love hearing everyone else's ideas, and now I have a few more to add to this list! :)

 

Jennifer

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Don't ever underestimate the power of good old-fashioned card games! We were playing cards at my parents' over Christmas. My 1st grader had a score of 18 and earned 5 more points. We weren't adding two-digit numbers together yet, and she was a little confused. My dad tried explaining it to her with carrying, but she wasn't getting it. I said, "Look, how far away from 20 is your 18?" A light bulb immediately went on, and she said, "Oh! So it's 23!" From that one game she learned how to get her number to a multiple of 10 and work with it from there. AMAZING!

 

Okay. Done now! :tongue_smilie:

 

Jennifer

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This would be for my 6 year old that is using Singapore 1A and working on number bonds. I am looking for ANY ideas but, would like to stay away from basic drill and flashcards for right now.

 

Thank you!

 

What I used to do with ds was use objects (such as pencils, small toys, unifix cubes...) to "act out" the problems. For example, when learning about adding to 10 we'd take ten pencils and work out how many ways you could make 10 by actually moving them into groups of 4 and 6 or 3 and 7, etc. We'd do the same thing with unifix cubes (a fabulous manip to have on hand if you don't already- great for learning patterning of all kinds). We also sometimes used base 10 cubes to work through problems.

 

At this age, manipulations are still very important for understanding abstract concepts and making them more concrete (counting objects verses numbers on paper).

 

HTH!

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We have and play the Right Start games too, and they've been good, though my dd started finding some of them repetitive. I really really like the "Corners" game from that set, though.

 

We just got a whole bunch of new math-based games, and the one that most clearly works on math facts is "1-2-3 Oy!". It's pretty fun, there are a lot of ways to play it, and you can work on number recognition, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts. My husband and I were taking it for a test run tonight and it was interesting to see how needing to do the math was slowing down our usual playing style. But with my daughter we'll start very slowly (dh and I didn't start slowly!) and I think she'll enjoy it. Oh, and we got it from funagain.com, but I saw that Rainbow Resource carries it too. It was less than $10, which is often easier to budget in than the RS games set.

 

We also got "Frog Juice" and it does some basic math skills building too.

 

Have fun!

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I'll second that from my own experience! I was well into adulthood before I figured out why I could add so well. When I was 13 my mom taught me to play canasta and we played a lot! All those games of counting up points/scores was great work on my addition!

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If you don't mind a few holes in your walls, there are two similar dart games (301 and 501) that are commonly played in England.

 

In college and beyond, I became supremely impressed with how well even more-than-half drunk Englishmen (who otherwise gave the impression that they were layabouts and wastrels) could subtract in their heads. Really uncanny!

 

Pub-school :D

 

Bill

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Connect 4! The new version of the game has three playing options. The 3rd option is called "pop 10". You start with the game grid filled. Then players take turns popping out one of their checkers from the bottom row. If that popped out checker was in a row of four, they win the checker. The winner is the first to get ten checkers. I use 4X6 index cards to make a 10 grid. Checkers that have been won are placed on it and at the end of your turn you must announce your score. "I have 3. I need 7 more to make 10". You could change the total needed to practice other number bonds.
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One year I hosted a New Year's Eve party for my niece and nephews. I made a game for them with balloons. Each balloon had a number written on it. We sat in a small bedroom and bounced the balloons in the air until the music stopped. Then everyone caught a balloon. They added the number on their balloon to their score. We kept going until someone reached 100. They thought the person to get to 100 first would win. But, at that point I announced we would be subtracting and the winner would be the first to get back to zero.

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If you don't mind a few holes in your walls, there are two similar dart games (301 and 501) that are commonly played in England.

 

In college and beyond, I became supremely impressed with how well even more-than-half drunk Englishmen (who otherwise gave the impression that they were layabouts and wastrels) could subtract in their heads. Really uncanny!

 

Pub-school :D

 

Bill

 

Now that's a way to cultivate a love for math, some warm beer and darts.:D

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Now that's a way to cultivate a love for math, some warm beer and darts.:D

 

May not be everyone pint of ale, but I kid you not, when it come to "mental math" British dart players have it going on. Big time!

 

We American dart players tend to play a game called "American Cricket" which, in case you haven't guessed it yet, is not super-taxing on the mental math skills.

 

:cheers2:

 

Bill

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  • 3 years later...
Guest Reasie

This is exactly the question I came to ask!!! Thanks for everyone's ideas!! My 4 yo dd has the 10's down due to a song I found when searching the internet before. It is sung to the tune of "Row, Row Your Boat" (so sorry that I don't know who to credit for this - it's GREAT!)

 

9 and 1 are number bonds

8 and 2 are friends

7 and 3, 6 and 4

5 and 5 are twins!

 

It really, really works! Now, for all those other number bonds! :)

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