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Klothos

Enroll your teenager at Harvard before graduation -- check this out!

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I recently discovered that Harvard has an extension school which admits students no matter what their academic background and has no prerequisites. It doesn't matter what you scored on the SAT (or if you've even taken the SAT). No transcripts are required whatsoever. The extension school was created as a kind of experimental program, one where any person can enroll and earn a degree as long as they work hard.

 

All the courses can be completed online, with the caveat that one semester must be spent at the physical college (most people just rent an apartment over the summer to finish up). Most undergraduate courses there cost less than $1000, so a full 32 course undergraduate degree costs considerably less than one year of school in many prestigious traditional 4 year colleges. And once completed, your son or daughter will be able to say they have a degree from Harvard (it doesn't matter that they used the extension school, the degree will be the same as if they enrolled in the usual way).

 

Courses are offered on both weekdays and weeknights, so it's easy to schedule school around work. Many courses are available online, and for the undergrad degree, only 16 credits (4 courses) are required to be taken on campus. All courses are transferable, so if your teenager just wanted to take a few courses for college credit and have them transferred to a local college, you could do that, too.

 

The classes will be more difficult than the typical undergraduate fair at other colleges, but that's not surprising since, well, it is Harvard. To be honest, most college courses are much less rigorous than the homeschooling high school curricula of The Well-Trained Mind, anyway.

 

I think what we're going to do is start with trying one of the basic courses in the fall of the ninth grade year; if it's too advanced, we'll know the specifics of the course difficulty and will delay it according to our child's ability. If our child excels, we'll build our "high school" curriculum around taking two to four college classes per semester (focusing on the courses they're taking and reserving homeschooling study of other subjects for the summer months). In theory, they could graduate at the age of 18. :auto: Of course, that's probably too optimistic, but at the very least our child will have earned some college credit, and it's a great alternative the typical college life (we have many objections to how removed from reality the university experience usually is).

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Just to clarify, I do not believe that you get the same degree as a normal undergraduate. I knew someone who attended this program, albeit 20 years ago, and while it is offered under the auspices of Harvard and carries that name, you receive a Bachelor of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies. Normal undergraduates receive a regular B.A. or B.S. from Harvard College. I think some major universities and employers would probably recognize the distinction. Of course, I could be wrong since this was a long time ago.

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Just to clarify, I do not believe that you get the same degree as a normal undergraduate. I knew someone who attended this program, albeit 20 years ago, and while it is offered under the auspices of Harvard and carries that name, you receive a Bachelor of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies. Normal undergraduates receive a regular B.A. or B.S. from Harvard College. I think some major universities and employers would probably recognize the distinction. Of course, I could be wrong since this was a long time ago.

 

This is exactly right ~ and still true. It is definitely not the same as a "Harvard degree." The word "extension" in a degree is synonymous with "adult education" or "continuing education." Most large universities have extension/continuing ed programs; the classes are usually not taught by the regular faculty.

http://www.extension.harvard.edu/2009-10/programs/

 

Jackie

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I recently discovered that Harvard has an extension school which admits students no matter what their academic background and has no prerequisites. It doesn't matter what you scored on the SAT (or if you've even taken the SAT). No transcripts are required whatsoever. The extension school was created as a kind of experimental program, one where any person can enroll and earn a degree as long as they work hard.

 

All the courses can be completed online, with the caveat that one semester must be spent at the physical college (most people just rent an apartment over the summer to finish up). Most undergraduate courses there cost less than $1000, so a full 32 course undergraduate degree costs considerably less than one year of school in many prestigious traditional 4 year colleges. And once completed, your son or daughter will be able to say they have a degree from Harvard (it doesn't matter that they used the extension school, the degree will be the same as if they enrolled in the usual way).

 

Courses are offered on both weekdays and weeknights, so it's easy to schedule school around work. Many courses are available online, and for the undergrad degree, only 16 credits (4 courses) are required to be taken on campus. All courses are transferable, so if your teenager just wanted to take a few courses for college credit and have them transferred to a local college, you could do that, too.

 

The classes will be more difficult than the typical undergraduate fair at other colleges, but that's not surprising since, well, it is Harvard. To be honest, most college courses are much less rigorous than the homeschooling high school curricula of The Well-Trained Mind, anyway.

 

I think what we're going to do is start with trying one of the basic courses in the fall of the ninth grade year; if it's too advanced, we'll know the specifics of the course difficulty and will delay it according to our child's ability. If our child excels, we'll build our "high school" curriculum around taking two to four college classes per semester (focusing on the courses they're taking and reserving homeschooling study of other subjects for the summer months). In theory, they could graduate at the age of 18. :auto: Of course, that's probably too optimistic, but at the very least our child will have earned some college credit, and it's a great alternative the typical college life (we have many objections to how removed from reality the university experience usually is).

 

I met a 45-year-old former high school dropout who is in this program. She is working toward a PhD in Humanities and will soon be doing her on- campus classes.

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I just read this on their website-

 

Most students at the Extension School have college degrees and are taking courses for personal enrichment or professional development, not to fulfill degree requirements.

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I found out about the extension school about a month ago from another homeschool mom whose daughter had done a course through them and so I called the school to ask more questions. The woman I spoke with said many students are older professionals, but they do have some high school students and freshman and they have some homeschoolers. Students as young as 11 years old can take courses, which is great since some colleges, including some comnunity colleges, state you must be 16.

 

She did mention that some people will also start at the extension school and then transfer into the main school to finish their degree. So it is a good sort of back door into Harvard if you don't want to go through the difficulty of applying directly into the main school as a high school student. You could do a year or two in the extension school and then transfer in and your final degree/diploma would say Harvard not Harvard extension school.

 

I also think it could be helpful to go to the extension school if you are going to go to grad school at any other college in the future. I think it still looks good to future schools even if it says Extension school on your undergraduate diploma when applying. Harvard extension has a list on their website of grad schools where past extension students have been accepted and it includes several other ivies, or you could go to Harvard's grad school after doing the extension school.

 

I think it is a nice option to know it is there even if they only take a few courses in high school to put on their transcript, just like any other online or distance course, except it says Harvard. My daughter wants to take a course in the next year or two.

 

Just my thoughts.

 

Danielle

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Northwestern University also has a school of continuing studies with a similar online program. The people who teach there are either profs at other colleges or people who've worked and have considerable knowledge in a particular field -- for example, accounting.

 

http://www.scs.northwestern.edu/

 

I think extension and online schools are a terrific option. It will be interesting to see what they're like in the future.

 

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She did mention that some people will also start at the extension school and then transfer into the main school to finish their degree. So it is a good sort of back door into Harvard if you don't want to go through the difficulty of applying directly into the main school as a high school student. You could do a year or two in the extension school and then transfer in and your final degree/diploma would say Harvard not Harvard extension school.

 

I also think it could be helpful to go to the extension school if you are going to go to grad school at any other college in the future. I think it still looks good to future schools even if it says Extension school on your undergraduate diploma when applying. Harvard extension has a list on their website of grad schools where past extension students have been accepted and it includes several other ivies, or you could go to Harvard's grad school after doing the extension school.

 

 

I'm leery of posting but I'm worried some may get the impression this is an easy back door to Harvard. I'm not trying to discourage anyone but believe me if it were that easy, many more people would be doing it.

 

When you look at the transfers or admissions to other universities, you have to realize that many of the students attending are mature professionals who have significant work experience and/or prior post-secondary education. Therefore, they have a lot to offer as candidates for transfer or admissions to other schools. The same may not be true of younger students.

 

Harvard's standards for admission are very high and a student must still prove they are competitive with other candidates in terms of GRE/LSAT/MCAT, GPA, and other requirements. There's no automatic acceptance as from a Community College to a State University.

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I did not mean to imply that it was an easy way to get in to Harvard in terms of academic rigor or that there was a guarantee of future admission. I just meant it was easier than the hassle of proving yourself against all the other high school students and the testing etc. to get into the regular program when they only have like a 7% acceptance rate.

 

But, if you prove yourself capable by doing well in the courses in the extension school then you show that you are capable of doing Harvard level work. My guess is that a student who was not capable of doing the work would not even bother applying to the regular program. They would struggle to complete the courses and it wouldn't be to their personal benefit.

 

And yes, to get into the other schools as far as grad school then you would have to take GRE's, etc. I didn't mean that just having the extension school on there would be a guaranteed admission to anywhere, but that having Harvard Extension on the diploma did not limit these other people from getting accepted to other grad schools. And if there is a need for more professional work experience on the resume, then it would be the same as many people fresh out of college. Many work for a few years before going back for the grad degree.

 

Danielle

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I also think it could be helpful to go to the extension school if you are going to go to grad school at any other college in the future. I think it still looks good to future schools even if it says Extension school on your undergraduate diploma when applying.

Admissions officers know what "Extension" means. When an admissions officer sees courses from Harvard Extension on a transcript, they don't think "this kid went to Harvard," they think "this student took adult education courses on the Harvard campus."

 

Harvard extension has a list on their website of grad schools where past extension students have been accepted and it includes several other ivies, or you could go to Harvard's grad school after doing the extension school....I just meant it was easier than the hassle of proving yourself against all the other high school students and the testing etc. to get into the regular program when they only have like a 7% acceptance rate.

I doubt Harvard's transfer acceptance rate is any higher than their undergraduate acceptance rate, and a student would probably have a much higher chance of acceptance coming from another elite school than they would from Harvard Extension. Ditto for grad school ~ if a student has the GRE scores and GPA and all the other qualifications to get into Harvard grad school, then presumably they could have been accepted into a much more prestigious undergrad school than Harvard Extension.

 

I suspect that when the Extension admissions people talk about students "transferring" into the regular program or into grad school there, they're talking about situations like a retired neurosurgeon going back to school for a degree in history, KWIM?

 

I'm not saying there's anything wrong with taking courses there, or that the courses wouldn't be a valuable experience for a student, I'm just gently suggesting that they are really not a "back door" into Harvard, and I don't think they carry the level of prestige with admissions officers than some may think.

 

Jackie

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I met a 45-year-old former high school dropout who is in this program. She is working toward a PhD in Humanities and will soon be doing her on- campus classes.

 

Harvard Extension doesn't have a PhD program. :confused:

 

Their highest degree is a Master of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies, from Harvard Extension College. Maybe the person you met was exaggerating her qualifications? My MIL took a few weekend classes in archaeology from Oxford University's Extension program, and she used to tell people she was "doing a Master's at Oxford." :rolleyes:

 

Jackie

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Information from the website (I added bolding):

 

Tuition, ranging from $900 to $1,975 for undergraduate- and graduate-level courses, is listed with course descriptions. Full payment of tuition and the $50 nonrefundable registration fee is due at the time of registration. If you register during the late registration period, you are charged an additional $50 late fee. [END QUOTE]

 

Those are tuition fees for the extension program, not for the regular Harvard programs.

 

I could not, would not, pay these fees for my high schooler. (Can't do it for my college boys, either !)

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See, now I want to take some classes! This one sounds cool:

 

ANTH E-164 Tolkien as Translator: Language, Culture, and Society in Middle-Earth

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Tuition, ranging from $900 to $1,975 for undergraduate- and graduate-level courses, is listed with course descriptions.

 

Compare these fees with the cost of courses through UCLA Extension, which average about $400/course. I would hate to think that someone would pay almost $2000 for their child to take a course through Harvard Extension in the hope that it would impress an admissions officer, when it really wouldn't carry any more weight than a $400 course through UCLA or some other university's extension program.

 

Jackie

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Harvard Extension doesn't have a PhD program. :confused:

 

Their highest degree is a Master of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies, from Harvard Extension College. Maybe the person you met was exaggerating her qualifications? My MIL took a few weekend classes in archaeology from Oxford University's Extension program, and she used to tell people she was "doing a Master's at Oxford." :rolleyes:

 

Jackie

 

I think those are her long range plans, after she gets her Harvard degree.

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:iagree: It is expensive. However, there are a lot of other programs that are expensive too such as Stanford's EPGY $500 plus per quarter. Duke Tip estudies courses are $800 each for a semester and their weekend scholars programs are $450 for a weekend. There are summer camp experiences across the country that can cost $2000-3500 for three weeks.

 

It's all in what each family is willing to pay for their student to have these educational experiences. I think it's all extremely expensive. Whatever programs my dc participate in we are hoping some of it impresses some admissions officer somewhere whether it's an expensive online course, or volunteering for the Salvation Army. We don't choose programs and activities based on that though. My daughter just thought it would be cool to actually attempt a "Harvard" course whether she ever goes there or any other top school.

 

Danielle

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It's all in what each family is willing to pay for their student to have these educational experiences.
Maybe I'm picking apart what you meant, but "It's all in what each family is willing to pay..." is not right.

 

If I had the money, I'd be MORE than willing to pay for things I thought would be a great educational experience! There'd be all sorts of things I could do with and for my dd, and I'd be willing to do as much as she wanted that we felt would benefit her!

 

But, sad to say, though I am willing to pay for many things, I simply can not! There are just no funds available for my gradeschool or highschool child to take classes that cost that much! And for what? A name? I agree with the ones that said many schools have nearly exactly the same classes for half the price---why not try those? IF I were to do classes, even if I could afford Harvard and other high priced-educational institutions, I'd probably go with the cheaper ones, and put the other money into a car, or further education, or an educational trip!

 

And if this is an extension, that really doesn't carry weight with admissions officers, then what's the point of pay $1000 vs. $400? I just can't imagine paying that much, just because I want to say I took a class from Harvard! :001_huh: But then again, maybe if I had money to throw away I WOULD do that??? I dunno.

 

I'm not trying to be rude, I hope you understand that! It's hard to convey sincerity over the internet! :001_smile:

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Extension courses typically are open to anybody. I don't see any particular cachet from taking one of these courses.

 

On the other hand, I always could enroll as a student at the University of Mississippi, then tell everyone how I received my degree "at Oxford." ! :)

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It is expensive. However, there are a lot of other programs that are expensive too such as Stanford's EPGY $500 plus per quarter. Duke Tip estudies courses are $800 each for a semester and their weekend scholars programs are $450 for a weekend.

 

A key difference here, though, is that the EPGY and TIP programs are highly selective, so these courses do carry weight with admissions people. Extension courses, whether at Harvard or any other college, are generally "open admission," meaning anyone willing to write a check can take them. An admissions officer is far more likely to be impressed by a series of EPGY/CTD/TIP courses on an applicant's transcript than Harvard Extension courses.

 

Extension and Continuing Ed programs are sort of like Community Colleges which use the facilities of a larger university. They generally have quite separate administration, and the faculty and courses are not the same as the "regular" university. So a student taking a Harvard Extension course is not really getting a "Harvard education," if you know what I mean. And $2000 is an awful lot to pay for the equivalent of a CC course.

 

Jackie

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I would hope that just because the class was through the extension school it would not be considered "throwing money away." Hopefully my child would be learning something from the class regardless of whether or not the faculty was actually a Harvard professor. And some of the classes are taught by Harvard faculty, at least that's what they state on their website. I also wouldn't say that it doesn't carry any weight with an admissions officer. That is something we cannot prove. If admissions officers want outside classes to corroborate the "Mommy grades" we give at home certainly this would qualify, same as a CC or co-op class. But, is it worth the $900-$2000? Quite possibly not.

 

I must have miscommunicated when I wrote "willing to pay". I just meant we can't all afford certain programs, but even if we could, is that where our family would choose to put our money? I did not mean it in the way I think you understood it. KWIM.

 

There are so many educational and extracurricular options for our children that it can be hard to decide. We all share various opportunities on this board and what works for one family may not work for another. I think the original poster was just trying to share something that might be of interest to others.

 

It is often hard to convey meaning through this type of written communication. All I meant when I posted originally was that I think this is a nice option for some people among the many options available for students.

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Maybe I'm picking apart what you meant, but "It's all in what each family is willing to pay..." is not right.

 

If I had the money, I'd be MORE than willing to pay for things I thought would be a great educational experience! There'd be all sorts of things I could do with and for my dd, and I'd be willing to do as much as she wanted that we felt would benefit her!

 

But, sad to say, though I am willing to pay for many things, I simply can not! There are just no funds available for my gradeschool or highschool child to take classes that cost that much! And for what? A name? I agree with the ones that said many schools have nearly exactly the same classes for half the price---why not try those? IF I were to do classes, even if I could afford Harvard and other high priced-educational institutions, I'd probably go with the cheaper ones, and put the other money into a car, or further education, or an educational trip!

 

And if this is an extension, that really doesn't carry weight with admissions officers, then what's the point of pay $1000 vs. $400? I just can't imagine paying that much, just because I want to say I took a class from Harvard! :001_huh: But then again, maybe if I had money to throw away I WOULD do that??? I dunno.

 

I'm not trying to be rude, I hope you understand that! It's hard to convey sincerity over the internet! :001_smile:

 

 

:iagree:

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I thought perhaps I could help clear up a couple of points discussed in this thread, since I am currently taking a class for graduate credit at the Harvard Extension School, and since I received a “degree of Bachelor of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies cum laude†from Harvard University in 1999.

 

 

  1. Those who say that the Extension School is not a “backdoor†for entry into Harvard College are correct.
  2. A majority of the faculty at the Extension School is from Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
  3. Some of the courses offered at the Extension School are basically “the same†as those offered at Harvard College; others are not.
  4. Several Harvard instructors have told me that they prefer teaching in the Extension School — and do so despite the comparatively low stipends they receive for teaching Extension classes — because the students are in general much more excited by, interested in, and dedicated to the learning process in general and the coursework in particular. For example, Dr. Marc Zender, Research Associate in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, and a Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology, wrote to members of his Extension School class “Tolkien as Translator†today [i quote with permission; more about the class below]:
     
    Your ideas, insights, and challenges have been invigorating and thought-provoking, and I honestly feel that I have come to know many of you better even than those students I see on a twice-weekly basis in my large lecture courses here in the college.
The range of ages of Extension School students — degree-seeking and otherwise — is vast. I’ve been in classes with 15-year-olds and with 90-year-olds. This diversity, I think, is one of the strengths of the Extension School.
Anyone may take a course.
Matriculating and becoming a degree-seeking student is comparatively easy, because there’s no built-in limit to the number of students they accept. Acceptance is based not on standardized test scores or previous academic work, but on the applicant’s ability to maintain a high average in three Extension School courses. (The exact requirement depends on the program.)
As with any academic program, the classes are not completely consistent in the amount or quality of work required. The classes are by no means “simple†or dumbed-down, however. I am just completing the course that Raven referred to earlier in the thread: Dr. Marc Zender’s ANTH E-164, “Tolkien as Translator.†For graduate credit, my assignments included writing papers totaling about 25,000 words (about 110 old-style double-spaced typed pages) — undergraduate requirements were about half that. Quality expectations were very high. The reading load was fairly light (3 articles of varying lengths each week) — but we were also required to have finished The Lord of the Rings with all of its appendices (more than 1100 pages) by the second week of class. [it was an excellent class, btw.]
The organization of Harvard is more similar to that of English universities than it is to other American universities; the university comprises many different schools, including for example Harvard College, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard Business School, and Harvard Extension School. The interrelationships of these schools with each other and with the university itself have changed somewhat over the centuries, but essentially each school is responsible for its own admissions and degree requirements.
Requirements for completing a degree at the Extension School are many and varied. When you’ve completed them, you graduate with all the other Harvard graduates at the same ceremony right in Harvard Yard. The diploma is from “Harvard University†and is conferred by “The President and Fellows of Harvard College, with the consent of the … Board of Overseers … acting on the recommendation of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.â€
The “Bachelor of Liberal Arts†(translated from artium liberalium baccalaureus, whence “ALBâ€) is the exact same degree conferred upon graduating Harvard College students. Where theirs might be in “English†or “Art History,†those graduating from the Extension School have majored in “Extension Studies.†The “in Extension Studies†phrase and the presence of the signature of the Dean of Continuing Education are the only differences evident on the diploma.
Currently, most courses taken at the Extension School for undergraduate credit cost just under $1000; courses taken for graduate credit cost just under $2000. That charge is for the full semester course — not per credit hour. This would make a full-time undergraduate tuition of somewhat under $8,000 per year — which compares quite favorably with the $34,000 per year for Harvard College. Even at that cost, “generous financial aid†is available for matriculated students. [i’m sorry I don’t know the numbers.]

 

No school or program is right for everybody, of course. The Harvard Extension School is a tremendous resource, though, and one too frequently overlooked even by those looking for creative ways of affording a high-quality education.

 

[i’ve talked this up enough that I feel obliged to say that I am not in any way affiliated with the school or program, other than as a satisfied graduate and current student.]

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I thought perhaps I could help clear up a couple of points discussed in this thread, since I am currently taking a class for graduate credit at the Harvard Extension School, and since I received a “degree of Bachelor of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies cum laude†from Harvard University in 1999.

 

 

 

 

Thank you for taking the time to post this.

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I have just recently heard of Harvard Extension School and just discovered this thread. Erikhm, thank you for your very informative post, I think this is extremely interesting. I would like to know if anyone else has used this program to get their degree? Pros and cons?

 

Thanks! :)

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I've known about Harvard Extension for years, but I never realized they offered degrees - I thought it was strictly for enrichment. Most colleges' community ed/outreach type programs don't have much advanced coursework or a progression of studies.

 

Harvard is commuting distance for us - kind of seems like it could be a better back-up plan than community college... do the credits transfer if you just took a year or two there?

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Are you saying that any age student could take this and it would count as college credit? Is this a dual credit option for high schoolers?

 

I realize that this is not "Harvard" per se BUT it does appear to be giving college credit to any student regardless of age if they can complete the course. Are there any other colleges online that will let a student take a class and get credit with no prerequisites or age requirements?

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OLD THREAD ALERT!!!

 

I'm bumping this old thread to see if anyone has any new information on the Harvard Extension program, because it appears that high school kids can take their online courses for college credit, and I think it might be a good way for my ds to get some college credits without having to attend classes at our local cc. It looks like they offer a nice selection of online courses.

 

I was also thinking that perhaps the credits from Harvard Extension might be easily transferred to another undergraduate program, which is an important consideration. I have heard horror stories from people whose kids have taken cc courses and not had the credits transfer to a 4-year university, so although I have only heard positive comments about our local cc, it's still a bit of a worry.

 

I know from reading this thread that many people are anti-Harvard Extension because of the high cost and I realize that Harvard Extension degrees and credits don't have the prestige of those from the "real" Harvard, but those things aren't an issue for us right now -- I'm only interested in knowing if anyone has had their high schoolers take Harvard Extension courses, and whether or not they had any trouble transferring the credits they earned.

 

Again, I'm trying to find a way for my ds to take accredited online college courses, and this was one of the options I found.

 

Thanks for any info or advice that anyone may have -- sorry to have bumped this old thread, but I thought the info in it might be of more help to others than if I'd just started a brand new thread.

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In my searches, I've found many online options for dual enrollment or AA online. These would be by schools with B&M existence as well as online programs, non-profit, accredited schools. 

 

You might check with your local university or CC to see what they offer. Our local university offers several classes online as dual enrollment with significant cost savings. 

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Catwoman,  my children have not used Harvard extension, but it is very common in the Boston area for homeschoolers to do so.  I'll look into the experiences of some Boston people and see what they say.

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In my searches, I've found many online options for dual enrollment or AA online. These would be by schools with B&M existence as well as online programs, non-profit, accredited schools.

 

You might check with your local university or CC to see what they offer. Our local university offers several classes online as dual enrollment with significant cost savings.

Thanks! :)

 

The courses at the universities near us are more expensive than the Harvard Extension option, and it appears that my ds is still too young to take online courses at our local cc (which would be cheaper.)

 

I know there are many accredited online options out there -- sometimes I think it would be easier if there were fewer options, because I tend to research everything to death! I was just thinking of the Harvard Extension courses because many of them sounded like they might be of interest to my ds, so that's why I figured I would ask about them.

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Catwoman, my children have not used Harvard extension, but it is very common in the Boston area for homeschoolers to do so. I'll look into the experiences of some Boston people and see what they say.

Thanks -- I would really appreciate that! :)

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Thanks! :)

 

The courses at the universities near us are more expensive than the Harvard Extension option, and it appears that my ds is still too young to take online courses at our local cc (which would be cheaper.)

 

I know there are many accredited online options out there -- sometimes I think it would be easier if there were fewer options, because I tend to research everything to death! I was just thinking of the Harvard Extension courses because many of them sounded like they might be of interest to my ds, so that's why I figured I would ask about them.

 

Oh, yes, fewer options might be nice. :lol: 

 

If you're looking for an online component in a less structured environment, you might check out some MOOCs. Coursera is adding classes all the time, Open2study is one I stumbled upon recently as well. I plan on using a few this year as an exposure to certain topics. 

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Oh, yes, fewer options might be nice. :lol:

 

If you're looking for an online component in a less structured environment, you might check out some MOOCs. Coursera is adding classes all the time, Open2study is one I stumbled upon recently as well. I plan on using a few this year as an exposure to certain topics.

THANK YOU!!! I'll check it out!

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Data points so far: Harvard did not take extension credits; Berklee took most.

Wow, that's weird. Harvard didn't accept extension credits from its own accredited extension school? :confused:

 

Do you know if they didn't accept the credits as a matter of policy, or if perhaps that particlar student's credits weren't accepted simply because they didn't apply toward his or her degree program?

 

Thanks for taking the time to ask people about this for me -- I really appreciate it! :)

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