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Hi!

 

For those of you who were accepted to MIt, could you please share what you did for science and math? My 7th grader wants to go there and I want to get on the right track. What tests did you take, books used, competitions? I figure if we map out a plan now and it looks good for them, then it will probably do just well for our state schools. I know we need to get on some math teams but not sure where to go with that. The area I'm in will involve me doing all the set up for that. But... please share if you don't mind

Thanks

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If your child has aspirations of attending MIT, I'd suggest that you join the Yahoo group hs2coll · Homeschooling toward college. I've seen several posters there who have children who were accepted. It's a great group to join especially if your child is aiming for admission to a selective college. Several of the members have children who are or were heavily involved in math competitions.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Hi all, I have a son currently at MIT (senior in EE/CS department with a math minor) and a 12th grade daughter who was accepted to MIT for next year (she hasn't made her desicion yet, but MIT is one of her top choices)

 

I'll be glad to share what we did for math and science. Just realize that there are lots of paths that could lead to MIT; this is not the only way by any means! It's got to be tailored to your own kids and their passions. We started out as fairly relaxed and followed our kids interests more intensely as they developed. I know other homeschooled kids at MIT who've had different backgrounds from mine entirely, from unschooling to mainly community college and outsourcing.

 

Especially in the middle school years, we felt it was important for them to have enough free time (not for video games or that stuff, though) to develop some self-directed learning. For instance, my son spent his free time in middle school learning to program in different computer languages. Now he's a Computer Science major. My daughter used her free time to read a lot, study extra math topics, and to pursue art projects. She will major in math with classics or art as possible minor fields. We tailored the kids' high school studies to fit their interests as they formed. And I don't think I could have done it in advance; things changed a lot from year to year and flexibility in the overall plan was a necessity!

 

One last caveat: my kids test well and easily. It's not much of a stress to them and they sort of enjoy it. I don't think I'd do this much testing if they weren't this way! Also they love math and science to the extent that they wanted to study lots of it at once. This schedule was driven by them, not by me :-)

 

Here's what my son did for math:

 

Grade 6 - Jacobs algebra 1

Grade 7 - Dolciani algebra 2

Grade 8 - Jacobs geometry

summer - MathPath camp

Grade 9 - Precalculus ( AoPS texts at home)

Grade 10 - AP Calc BC (old edition of Thomas & Finney at home)

.............- AP Comp Sci AB (PA Homeschoolers)

summer - Canada/USA Mathcamp

Grade 11 - Multivariable Calculus (Marsden & Tromba text at home)

.............- Olympiad Problem Solving (AoPS online)

.............- AP Statistics (at home)

summer - MOSP camp, Canada/USA Mathcamp

Grade 12 - Differential Equations (Edwards & Penney text at home)

.............- Linear Algebra (Apostol text at home)

.............- Olympiad Geometry & WOOT (AoPS online)

 

Here's what my daughter did for math:

 

Grade 5/6 - Jacobs algebra and NEM 1 and 2

Grade 7 - Jacobs geometry

Grade 8 - Algebra 2 (Dolciani and AoPS texts)

...........- Intro to Number Theory and MathCounts (AoPS online classes)

summer - MathPath camp

Grade 9 - Precalculus (AoPS texts at home)

...........- Intermediate Algebra (AoPS online - now it's called Algebra 3)

...........- Intermediate Trig & Complex (AoPS online - no longer offered)

summer - Canada/USA Mathcamp

Grade 10 - AP Calc BC (Calculus for the Forgetful text, at home)

.............-AP Stats (PA Homeschoolers)

.............- Intermediate Number Theory & AIME Series (AoPS online)

summer - Canada/USA Mathcamp

Grade 11 - Multivariable Calculus (Marsden & Tromba, home)

.............-Olympiad Geometry & AMC-12 Problem Series (AoPS online)

.............-AP Computer Science AB (Litvin text, at home)

summer - Princeton Summer Workshop in Math & Canada/USA Mathcamp

Grade 12 - University-level Number Theory (EPGY)

.............- Linear Algebra (Linear Algebra Done Right text, at home)

.............- Differential Equations ( Simmons text, at home)

.............- Programming in Scheme (MIT open courseware)

 

Besides the AP testing, they both took the SAT II in math level 2 at the end of grade 10.

 

Competition math: Both did MathCounts in middle school. Son did AMC's each year and USAMTS in high school. Daughter did those and also Mandelbrot, ARML, I-Test, Purple Comet, Math Prize for Girls, and several travel math meets with her travel team. Son also participated extensively in the USACO computing olympiad.

 

Here's what my son did for science: (all our science was done at home)

 

Grade 7 & 8: Rainbow Science

Grade 9: Spectrum Chemistry

Grade 10: algebra-based Physics (Giancoli)

Grade 11: AP Chem (Zumdahl) & AP Physics C (Halliday & Resnick)

Grade 12: AP Bio (Campbell)

 

My daughter did this: (same texts)

 

Grade 6 & 7: Rainbow Science

Grade 8: Apologia Biology

Grade 9: Spectrum Chemistry

Grade 10: AP Chemistry

Grade 11: AP Physics C

Grade 12: AP Biology

 

They both took the SAT II chemistry and physics tests at the end of their AP years in those sciences.

 

~Kathy

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Wow -- thanks, Kathy! One of my sons would love to go to a similar school (Caltech), and this is so helpful.

 

On a side note, Kathy, I've been meaning to tell you we're about to start Spectrum chem (on your recommendation) and I'm very excited (I was a chem major). It looks like a great program -- exactly what I was looking for! And my son is going to state MathCounts this weekend -- another program you recommended! He's very excited about coaching MathCounts next year, too, like your daughter. And he's eating up the AoPS materials (books & website). I'm forever in your debt :001_smile:

 

Best wishes to your daughter, and I'm sure we'll all be interested to hear where she eventually chooses to attend college!

 

~Laura

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Hi Laura,

 

I'm glad it helps:) And I'm glad that the chemistry and AoPS are good matches for your son. I hope you have as much fun with them as we did.

 

Congratulations to your son for advancing to the state level of MathCounts! What fun for him and certainly an impressive accomplishment in a state like CA. Good luck!

 

Thanks for the good wishes...dd would like for the next two weeks to pass quickly, then on to decision-making :)

 

~Kathy

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Kathy - I have a question about your kids' testing. It looks like from what you posted that they took the Math Level 2 SAT subject test about the same time they took the AP Calculus exam.

 

Besides the AP testing, they both took the SAT II in math level 2 at the end of grade 10.

 

My boys will be finishing up precalculus this summer and starting calculus in the fall. Is there an advantage to taking the SAT subject test about the same time as the AP Calculus exam? I guess I was thinking they would take the subject test sometime after finishing precalculus but well before the AP -- but maybe I'm missing something. Thanks for any advice you have! (I think we talked about this before -- how in the "old days" we just took all of our "achievement tests" the same day in 12th grade, with no prep ;-)

 

Yes, state MathCounts was *very* exciting. A privilege to watch the countdown round. Those kids are amazing. And a boy my sons know from track is going to nationals!

 

Oh, and my son is going to a math camp this summer (his first) -- and he's *very* excited. Another thing you recommended! (He decided against MathPath; he'll do one a bit closer to home.)

 

~Laura

Edited by Laura in CA
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Laura,

 

Yep, they'd be fine taking the SAT level 2 subject test in math after precalculus. There are absolutely no calculus topics on that one. Just be sure to take a look at a sample test first. If I recall correctly, there were a few miscellaneous topics that the kids needed a quick review on beforehand. We used this book from the college board, which contains two real practice tests (no teaching or review, just the tests).

 

And I hope your son has a terrific time at camp this summer! You're lucky to have many good choices right in CA. My kids grew up in so many good ways at camp (academically and otherwise). This will be the first summer in years that I won't have one attending. It's my daughter's last summer before college, and she's staying home - yay! ('cause I'll miss her a LOT come fall). If things work out though, maybe she'll be able to attend the brand-new Mathcamp alumni weekend at the end of the summer. At least she's hoping...

 

Good luck to you and your boys, Laura, and be sure to stay in touch:).

 

~Kathy

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Wow, well Kathy's children have a really impressive list of classes! I'm always amazed at what kids can accomplish at such young ages. I suppose I'm just posting to say that, as Kathy mentioned, there are sooo many paths...and not one "right" way. I think the MIT admissions pages and blogs (Matt McGann) give an excellent insight into the things they look for...which is no one thing in particular. More than anything, I think they look for kids who have a real passion for something, and not necessarily math or science. If you have a kid who is a passionate learner, you probably know that already, although my son didn't really start showing the signs of this until late 8th grade. He's my oldest, and I am only just realizing now that all my kids aren't wired like that! He was highly motivated to study and learn, and like Kathy's kids, tests amazingly well. He was the driving force. I was the often confused guide that helped figure out the details, largely through the help of this board.

 

Just for comparison to Kathy's academics, I'll share what he did.

 

8th- Apologia biology

9th- Apologia chem/adv chem + AP chem exam

10th- piecemeal Java programming course + AP computer science exam (AB)

11th- Apologia physics/adv physics + AP physics B (not really useful, but we did it anyway)

12th- Halliday & Resnick physics + AP physics C (both exams) + physics and calculus subject exams (two subject exams along with the SAT or ACT are the only *required* testing)

 

8th- Saxon Algebra I

9- Jacobs Geometry

10th- Sax. Algebra II

11th- Sax. Advanced Math

12- Thinkwell Calculus + Calc BC exam

 

He was never on a math or science team, though he did want to do the chemistry olympiad--just ended up not working out because of the timing. He played three sports all through high school, was involved with CAP and 4-H to some degree, but not huge. He held leadership positions at the club level, but wasn't a regional or national "star". He worked full time in the summers on our farm. None of this makes him stand out too much, see? I think the thing that got him in was who he was. We were able to get enough of that to come through, both in his application answers and essays, and in the letter I submitted as his counselor. I wish I knew the hours I spent on that letter. I really wish I knew how much effect it had on the committee!! But I poured my heart into that thing, and I'd like to believe it made a difference.

 

I know this isn't so much what you had asked; you really wanted to know about the academics. I suppose I wanted you to see that kids do get in who weren't doing calculus in the 10th grade! If that is their ability level, then excellent-run with it! If not, help them be their best self and figure out how to make it show. There's no substitute for authentic love of doing...whatever it is. Almost every kid those admissions people read about has high-to perfect SAT's and AP exams out the wazoo. There's a necessary place for those things, but what are you beyond your scores? That's what they want to know about, and that's where there's a chance to shine. The admissions pages say all this. I'm just saying that it's really true! And if you can't get into MIT being your best self, then who needs them anyway? : )

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Wow, well Kathy's children have a really impressive list of classes! I'm always amazed at what kids can accomplish at such young ages. I suppose I'm just posting to say that, as Kathy mentioned, there are sooo many paths...and not one "right" way. I think the MIT admissions pages and blogs (Matt McGann) give an excellent insight into the things they look for...which is no one thing in particular. More than anything, I think they look for kids who have a real passion for something, and not necessarily math or science. If you have a kid who is a passionate learner, you probably know that already, although my son didn't really start showing the signs of this until late 8th grade. He's my oldest, and I am only just realizing now that all my kids aren't wired like that! He was highly motivated to study and learn, and like Kathy's kids, tests amazingly well. He was the driving force. I was the often confused guide that helped figure out the details, largely through the help of this board.

 

Just for comparison to Kathy's academics, I'll share what he did.

 

8th- Apologia biology

9th- Apologia chem/adv chem + AP chem exam

10th- piecemeal Java programming course + AP computer science exam (AB)

11th- Apologia physics/adv physics + AP physics B (not really useful, but we did it anyway) + physics and math subject exams (two subject exams along with the SAT or ACT are the only *required* testing)

12th- Halliday & Resnick physics + AP physics C (both exams)

 

8th- Saxon Algebra I

9- Jacobs Geometry

10th- Sax. Algebra II

11th- Sax. Advanced Math

12- Thinkwell Calculus + Calc BC exam

 

So you see, his schedule was pretty basic as far as subjects and texts. He was never on a math or science team, though he did want to do the chemistry olympiad--just ended up not working out because of the timing. He played three sports all through high school, was involved with CAP and 4-H to some degree, but not huge. He held leadership positions at the club level, but wasn't a regional or national "star". He worked full time in the summers on our farm. None of this makes him stand out too much, see? I think the thing that got him in was who he was. We were able to get enough of that to come through, both in his application answers and essays, and in the letter I submitted as his counselor. I wish I knew the hours I spent on that letter. I really wish I knew how much effect it had on the committee!! But I poured my heart into that thing, and I'd like to believe it made a difference.

 

I know this isn't so much what you had asked; you really wanted to know about the academics. I suppose I wanted you to see that kids do get in who weren't doing calculus in the 10th grade! If that is their ability level, then excellent-run with it! If not, help them be their best self and figure out how to make it show. There's no substitute for authentic love of doing...whatever it is. Almost every kid those admissions people read about has high-to perfect SAT's and AP exams out the wazoo. There's a necessary place for those things, but what are you beyond your scores? That's what they want to know about, and that's where there's a chance to shine. The admissions pages say all this. I'm just saying that it's really true! And if you can't get into MIT being your best self, then who needs them anyway? : )

Edited by Ms. Riding Hood
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thank you all! I was wondering about academics to make sure we were on the right track with school and not off in la la land somewhere. He's involved in quite a few things and is starting to hone in on what he likes (seems to be tinkering with mechanics) . Thanks for all the input. We hope to present him as the wacky neat person he is LOL!

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  • 9 months later...

Sure, I'd be glad to share.

 

Biology: Apologia Biology labs during middle school; Biology Labs Online during AP biology in high school. They're designed specifically to cover the AP bio required labs. Biology's our least favorite science, so this was enough for us.

 

Chemistry: Both kids worked through all the labs in Spectrum chemistry in ninth grade. In a word, they're fantastic. We did not do any additional labs during their AP chem year.

 

Physics: Both kids again worked through the Castle Heights Physics lab curriculum. We bought our lab supplies from Home Science Tools. One kid did this during his year of algebra-based physics, and the other did it during her AP Physics C year.

 

I was told a LOT that this would not be enough for the colleges like MIT (I'm not a good listener :tongue_smilie:). We did all lab work at home w/o outsourcing. I was careful that they took their time to do the labs well and understand them, and I bought quality lab equipment.

 

In my view, it's the thinking component that's important, not the fancy lab equipment. Do they understand how to set up an experiment? Are they accurate in their procedures and careful to record their data? Do they analyze the data thoughtfully and draw appropriate conclusions? Can they write it up? (not every time, but enough to learn how)

 

It didn't seem to make a difference to the colleges, but they did have the test scores to back up what they learned. And my son was hired as a lab TA in the EECS department at the end of his first semester at MIT, so I guessed it worked :D.

Edited by Kathy in Richmond
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Sure, I'd be glad to share.

 

Biology: Apologia Biology labs during middle school; Biology Labs Online during AP biology in high school. They're designed specifically to cover the AP bio required labs. Biology's our least favorite science, so this was enough for us.

 

Thanks for that Kathy - well especially for this part as I'm having trouble with Biology labs this year. Do I understand the pages right that it is only $30 for the lab manual with 12 labs? Seems cheap!

 

Joan

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Hi Joan!

 

Yes, it's not a bad deal at all. The catch is that the online portion only works for one year. So with multiple kids working in different years, you need to renew the online part. I was able to re-use the lab manual with my second child, though.

 

Make sure that when you order you get the "Student Lab Manual for all 12 Labs," with the PIN access code inside the cover (ISBN 0-8053-7017-X). You can activate the code when you go to their website and immediately start using the labs.

 

I also ordered the Instructor's lab manual (used; here are several offered for a few dollars each). You'll need it if you want answers to the questions posed in the lab manual.

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I would read COLLEGES THAT CHANGE LIVES before you set your hat on MIT.

 

Just say'n. I thought MIT for my son, too, but after reading this book, I think we have some much better fits (not just on size, but on what caliber of student the school puts out that is higher or comparable and what opportunities the student may have).

Edited by justamouse
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We did all lab work at home w/o outsourcing. I was careful that they took their time to do the labs well and understand them, and I bought quality lab equipment.

 

In my view, it's the thinking component that's important, not the fancy lab equipment. Do they understand how to set up an experiment? Are they accurate in their procedures and careful to record their data? Do they analyze the data thoughtfully and draw appropriate conclusions? Can they write it up? (not every time, but enough to learn how)

 

OK, I did not come to this thread because I am interested in MIT (though my grandfather went there); I came because someone recommended I read your posts here. I'm glad I did, because this above quote is VERY helpful to my thinking and planning for high school science!!!!!! It's sort of what I thought would be important, but to have someone like you confirm it, well that just makes my day. :D

 

I love all your posts anyway. Come back often, please!! :D

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Hi Joan!

 

Yes, it's not a bad deal at all. The catch is that the online portion only works for one year. So with multiple kids working in different years, you need to renew the online part. I was able to re-use the lab manual with my second child, though.

 

Make sure that when you order you get the "Student Lab Manual for all 12 Labs," with the PIN access code inside the cover (ISBN 0-8053-7017-X). You can activate the code when you go to their website and immediately start using the labs.

 

I also ordered the Instructor's lab manual (used; here are several offered for a few dollars each). You'll need it if you want answers to the questions posed in the lab manual.

 

Thanks very much Kathy! That link for the instructor's lab manual is great as the overseas shipping is very low (compared to Amazon). I'd wondered about the manual but hadn't even thought of asking. It is helpful to have someone who knows the ropes point the way.

 

Yes, come back as Colleen said!

 

Joan

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  • 2 months later...
Guest VincentHomeNJ
Sure, I'd be glad to share.

 

Biology: Apologia Biology labs during middle school; Biology Labs Online during AP biology in high school. They're designed specifically to cover the AP bio required labs. Biology's our least favorite science, so this was enough for us.

 

Chemistry: Both kids worked through all the labs in Spectrum chemistry in ninth grade. In a word, they're fantastic. We did not do any additional labs during their AP chem year.

 

Physics: Both kids again worked through the Castle Heights Physics lab curriculum. We bought our lab supplies from Home Science Tools. One kid did this during his year of algebra-based physics, and the other did it during her AP Physics C year.

 

I was told a LOT that this would not be enough for the colleges like MIT (I'm not a good listener :tongue_smilie:). We did all lab work at home w/o outsourcing. I was careful that they took their time to do the labs well and understand them, and I bought quality lab equipment.

 

In my view, it's the thinking component that's important, not the fancy lab equipment. Do they understand how to set up an experiment? Are they accurate in their procedures and careful to record their data? Do they analyze the data thoughtfully and draw appropriate conclusions? Can they write it up? (not every time, but enough to learn how)

 

It didn't seem to make a difference to the colleges, but they did have the test scores to back up what they learned. And my son was hired as a lab TA in the EECS department at the end of his first semester at MIT, so I guessed it worked :D.

Hi Kathy,

 

Thanks for all the lab info. We are so glad to have you in this community :)

 

I read through a number of your threads in WTM, it seems like you mostly mentioned what your son and daughter took in math and science. What about highschool non-science courses?

 

My daughter is interested in doing science or engineering when she get into college. I am wondering besides Reading/Writing, what non-science courses would you advise to take in order to enter those selective colleges? Are any of them compulsory/required by the colleges even her plan is doing engineering? For instance, is US History a required class? If it is, does she need to take any SAT or AP tests to validate that? Any advise will be appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Vincent

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Here's what my son did for science: (all our science was done at home)

 

Grade 7 & 8: Rainbow Science

Grade 9: Spectrum Chemistry

Grade 10: algebra-based Physics (Giancoli)

Grade 11: AP Chem (Zumdahl) & AP Physics C (Halliday & Resnick)

Grade 12: AP Bio (Campbell)

 

My daughter did this: (same texts)

 

Grade 6 & 7: Rainbow Science

Grade 8: Apologia Biology

Grade 9: Spectrum Chemistry

Grade 10: AP Chemistry

Grade 11: AP Physics C

Grade 12: AP Biologoy

 

They both took the SAT II chemistry and physics tests at the end of their AP years in those sciences.

 

~Kathy

 

Out of curiosity, did you document on a transcript that your dd had done the Apologia Biology course as an 8th grader, or did you just record the courses taken during grades 9-12. I've been going in circles trying to figure out what do to for science for my rising 7th and 8th graders and hadn't even considered just moving directly to high school level science (though I think they could handle the material).

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Kathy is an inspiration! Just bumping this as I reposted the same question hoping others will respond. For the dc's entering high school with high aspirations, it's so important to read specifics regarding what curriculum worked!

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Hi Kathy,

 

Thanks for all the lab info. We are so glad to have you in this community :)

 

I read through a number of your threads in WTM, it seems like you mostly mentioned what your son and daughter took in math and science. What about highschool non-science courses?

 

My daughter is interested in doing science or engineering when she get into college. I am wondering besides Reading/Writing, what non-science courses would you advise to take in order to enter those selective colleges? Are any of them compulsory/required by the colleges even her plan is doing engineering? For instance, is US History a required class? If it is, does she need to take any SAT or AP tests to validate that? Any advise will be appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Vincent

 

Out of curiosity, did you document on a transcript that your dd had done the Apologia Biology course as an 8th grader, or did you just record the courses taken during grades 9-12. I've been going in circles trying to figure out what do to for science for my rising 7th and 8th graders and hadn't even considered just moving directly to high school level science (though I think they could handle the material).

 

I have similar questions for Kathy, so I'm going to let her know there's an active thread waiting for her words of wisdom :D

One of my sons is in the same boat as Kathy's kids were, finishing up AP Calculus BC early in high school ... so, if we do post-calculus classes such as linear algebra or differential equations at home with a tutor, just exactly how do we "document" his learning? I'm used to having SAT subject tests or AP exams to 'verify' the mommy grades -- is it as simple as writing down a course title on the transcript and putting a grade ... ?? :001_huh: My son does want to try a CC course for multivariable calculus, but Kathy told me her kids took a full year to do multivariable, which sounds to me like a great idea ... but then we wouldn't have that CC grade. Also, I'm thinking my son will be "underwhelmed" by the quality of our local CC and decide to do subsequent math classes at home ... so how do we document it :confused:

 

And I, too, was going to ask Kathy what her kids did for *non*-science courses. My son wants to eventually take AP English Language & Composition with PA Homeschoolers, and I was hoping for feedback on the teacher, for future reference!

 

Thanks in advance, Kathy! :001_smile: I honestly don't know where I'd be without your advice and that of the other wise, BTDT ladies on this board!!!

 

~Laura

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Our Dd would love to take AP geography through PA homeschoolers!

She is begininng pre-calc...now as an 8th grader soon to be 9th grade and also young. How to keep up with this pace?? We have a tutor who can get her through calc., and thats it. CC/Online will have to be the path.

Still wondering about others who have kiddos in University with STEM majors...which science curriculum did you use?? How did you support the other core subjects?

:confused:

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Thanks, Laura in CA, for pointing me over here tonight! I've been behind on reading the boards since I just got back from a trip up to MIT to work as a parent volunteer at College Preview Weekend for newly admitted students. Lots of fun working with the admissions staff who put on a super four day get-to-know-MIT event (almost 1200 kids came & many more parents), and as a bonus I got to see my son every day over dinner.:)

 

My daughter is interested in doing science or engineering when she get into college. I am wondering besides Reading/Writing, what non-science courses would you advise to take in order to enter those selective colleges? Are any of them compulsory/required by the colleges even her plan is doing engineering? For instance, is US History a required class? If it is, does she need to take any SAT or AP tests to validate that? Any advise will be appreciated.

 

Hi Vincent! I don't think that there's one correct way to go about this, or anything compulsary that all these schools are looking for. They're looking for a rigorous and challenging courseload overall, but I don't think that means that you have to do AP-level everything. It's better from my observations to have them do what they're truly interested in & to spend the rest of their time developing an area of talent/passion or getting them out in the community volunteering or working. And no, I don't think that any of the colleges we looked at said that US History was a specific requirement.

 

My own kids are quite different: my son is *all* about engineering, math, science, computers; my daughter loves just about *everything* including humanities. So we individualized their high school programs. My son needed basic exposure to fields outside his interest areas and help with getting his writing up to par (not so much a problem for dd).

 

As for specifics, both kids took Latin through AP level (beyond for dd), and also validated it through SAT Subject exams and the NLE. They loved Latin and enjoyed their studies. We didn't outsource at all for Latin, so I felt that the testing was important, especially for dd, who was trying for an NLE scholarship and is now a Classics/Latin major in addition to math.

 

My son's English/ history was WTM based. He did Modern US/World history for 9th, Ancients for 10th, and Medieval & Renaissance for 11th grade. In 12th grade we jumped ship to allow him a semester of US Government and a semester of Economics at his request. These classes were all done at home - no outsourcing of any kind. The only testing he did was the AP Microeconomics and AP US Government exams at the end of 12th grade - not in time to affect college applications. He did take the SAT subject exam in US History only because one of his college apps (Michigan, I think) required a social studies SAT II. We only sent that particular score to that one college.

 

My daughter also did Ancients and Medieval Renaissance history and lit, but she used the Kolbe honors curriculum guides at home with me. In 11th grade she took AP English language with PA Homeschoolers (terrific course!) and US History at home with me. She also took the SAT subject test in English literature. In 12th grade she studied AP economics and AP US government & also literature and composition at home with me (basically works I thought she should read before college). Again, she took the AP econ and AP government exams at the end of 12th grade, not for college admissions purposes (too late for that), but because I required it.:001_smile:

 

Writing was integrated into all those homemade courses above, but we also used Write @ Home for both kids. I had my son take their research paper course, since I figured it would be useful for a future engineer! My daughter took several of their courses in 9th and 10th grade: the basic year-long classes and also their two essay writing workshops.

 

Both took piano for fine arts credit, and my daughter had lots of art studio work, too.

 

Since my son really had no outside teacher to write the required humanities/social science/arts recommendation letter for MIT, he used his piano teacher, who had taught him for ten years. I checked with MIT first and they were cool with that. My daughter used her PA Homeschool English teacher for that rec letter.

 

Out of curiosity, did you document on a transcript that your dd had done the Apologia Biology course as an 8th grader, or did you just record the courses taken during grades 9-12. I've been going in circles trying to figure out what do to for science for my rising 7th and 8th graders and hadn't even considered just moving directly to high school level science (though I think they could handle the material).

 

Yes, I did put any high school coursework prior to ninth grade on her transcript if it was a math, science, or Latin, and I included course descriptions & textbooks used along with her transcript. So the Apologia was on there, as were several math and Latin courses.

 

One of my sons is in the same boat as Kathy's kids were, finishing up AP Calculus BC early in high school ... so, if we do post-calculus classes such as linear algebra or differential equations at home with a tutor, just exactly how do we "document" his learning? I'm used to having SAT subject tests or AP exams to 'verify' the mommy grades -- is it as simple as writing down a course title on the transcript and putting a grade ... ?? :001_huh: My son does want to try a CC course for multivariable calculus, but Kathy told me her kids took a full year to do multivariable, which sounds to me like a great idea ... but then we wouldn't have that CC grade. Also, I'm thinking my son will be "underwhelmed" by the quality of our local CC and decide to do subsequent math classes at home ... so how do we document it :confused:

 

And I, too, was going to ask Kathy what her kids did for *non*-science courses. My son wants to eventually take AP English Language & Composition with PA Homeschoolers, and I was hoping for feedback on the teacher, for future reference!

~Laura

 

Hi Laura! Yeah, we just wrote those math courses on the transcript and attached a mommy grade (multivariable calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra). I did write semi-detailed course descriptions, and they did have other AoPS courses online throughout those last two years. Also, my daughter did a course through EPGY and had an official grade for that in 12th grade. And they both had their math/science recommendation letter written by a summer mathcamp mentor. But no, we didn't have any evaluation of their multivariable, diff eqn, etc, other than my own. I could have sent them to the local CC, but I cringed at the thought that I'd be spending time and money on a course that I could do better at home, and I decided to take the gamble.

 

I'd love to recommend dd's PA Homeschooler AP English teacher -she was terrific! Unfortunately, she returned to graduate school & no longer teaches for them. But I'd highly recommend that course in general if you can find a good teacher match for your child. My dd credits that class with really getting her writing skills up to par to be able to do well in college.

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Hi Laura! Yeah, we just wrote those math courses on the transcript and attached a mommy grade (multivariable calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra). I did write semi-detailed course descriptions, and they did have other AoPS courses online throughout those last two years. Also, my daughter did a course through EPGY and had an official grade for that in 12th grade. And they both had their math/science recommendation letter written by a summer mathcamp mentor. But no, we didn't have any evaluation of their multivariable, diff eqn, etc, other than my own. I could have sent them to the local CC, but I cringed at the thought that I'd be spending time and money on a course that I could do better at home, and I decided to take the gamble.

 

Thank you so much, Kathy, for staying up late and posting! :001_smile: OK, so this is reassuring. I was feeling a little lost!

 

I'd love to recommend dd's PA Homeschooler AP English teacher -she was terrific! Unfortunately, she returned to graduate school & no longer teaches for them. But I'd highly recommend that course in general if you can find a good teacher match for your child. My dd credits that class with really getting her writing skills up to par to be able to do well in college.

 

That's good to know. I'm *so* excited about AP Lang -- I just realized it uses *nonfiction* readings and teaches rhetoric -- wow! I'm planning this for my son in 11th grade also. I can't wait :001_smile:.

 

Your children are obviously exceptional, but it's also clear that you did a tremendous amount of work guiding them. You are an inspiration to us! :001_smile:

 

Thanks again, Kathy!

 

~Laura

 

who is also up late, with a son who left a German project until the last minute :)

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One last caveat: my kids test well and easily.

 

 

Perhaps Kathy is too polite to say directly that she has very intelligent children. I majored in physics at a selective instititution and think her curricula make sense -- for the top 1%. One way to see if your kids are MIT-smart is to have them participate in a talent search in 7th grade (taking the SAT or ACT). If they don't qualify for the summer courses based on their scores, they may be smart, but not MIT-smart.

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Perhaps Kathy is too polite to say directly that she has very intelligent children. I majored in physics at a selective instititution and think her curricula make sense -- for the top 1%. One way to see if your kids are MIT-smart is to have them participate in a talent search in 7th grade (taking the SAT or ACT). If they don't qualify for the summer courses based on their scores, they may be smart, but not MIT-smart.

 

I'm not sure I agree. I put in my two cents on the original thread back when, so you can see my post about our experience w/coursework, and how it is dramatically different than what Kathy's kids did. One reason I posted at that time was to say that, imho is isn't all about having that kind of curriculum. I think what Kathy has done with her kids, the courses they have taken--it's phenomenal! I highly applaud them for an incredible body of scholastic (and other) achievement.

 

However, as a 7th grader my own ds wouldn't likely have been identified as "MIT-smart". He actually got the idea to apply as a junior in high school. If we had been able to see transcripts/resumes of other applicants, I doubt that we would have had the heart to apply at all.

 

I'm not saying that a 7th grade talent search is a bad thing to do; however, a negative result shouldn't be the basis for discouraging or redirecting a kid towards a different goal--or the basis for much of anything other than getting into a summer program. If a kid has drive and desire, passion for learning--those things are what make you "MIT-smart". Plus, many, many, MANY kids who have all the right stuff--grades, test scores, competitions, research--do NOT get accepted. I truly believe that MIT admits students based on what they bring to the table that is different and unique. They want to see that you have the ability and background to do the work; but beyond that, what is it about you that will bring a unique contribution to the class? No offense, but brainiacs are a dime a dozen for HYPS/MIT admissions staff. They want to see a person.

 

My advice to moms with aspiring MIT kids is to encourage passions to the limit and dare to dream! And beyond that...have a backup plan.

 

 

Also, after posting it occurred to me to add something. This is one thing that we have not shared outside our immediate family, but perhaps it will lend credibility to what I've said. Ds applied early decision to MIT. In December, early admissions are announced. We were anxiously awaiting a letter when out of the blue, ds received a personal phone call from his admissions representative, informing him that he was officially admitted. He told ds that his application was one of the most outstanding he had ever read. Considering the courses ds took, his extra-curricular stuff, etc., this was (and is) a most shocking revelation. But again, I think it points to the idea of the person behind the transcript and the way he conveyed that in his app.

Edited by Ms. Riding Hood
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...help them be their best self and figure out how to make it show. There's no substitute for authentic love of doing...whatever it is. Almost every kid those admissions people read about has high-to perfect SAT's and AP exams out the wazoo. There's a necessary place for those things, but what are you beyond your scores? That's what they want to know about, and that's where there's a chance to shine.

 

An Ivy admissions board member told me something similar, but your words really hit it home. Thanks for sharing this!

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I'm not sure I agree. I put in my two cents on the original thread back when, so you can see my post about our experience w/coursework, and how it is dramatically different than what Kathy's kids did. One reason I posted at that time was to say that, imho is isn't all about having that kind of curriculum. I think what Kathy has done with her kids, the courses they have taken--it's phenomenal! I highly applaud them for an incredible body of scholastic (and other) achievement.

 

However, as a 7th grader my own ds wouldn't likely have been identified as "MIT-smart". He actually got the idea to apply as a junior in high school. If we had been able to see transcripts/resumes of other applicants, I doubt that we would have had the heart to apply at all.

 

I'm not saying that a 7th grade talent search is a bad thing to do; however, a negative result shouldn't be the basis for discouraging or redirecting a kid towards a different goal--or the basis for much of anything other than getting into a summer program. If a kid has drive and desire, passion for learning--those things are what make you "MIT-smart". Plus, many, many, MANY kids who have all the right stuff--grades, test scores, competitions, research--do NOT get accepted. I truly believe that MIT admits students based on what they bring to the table that is different and unique. They want to see that you have the ability and background to do the work; but beyond that, what is it about you that will bring a unique contribution to the class? No offense, but brainiacs are a dime a dozen for HYPS/MIT admissions staff. They want to see a person.

 

My advice to moms with aspiring MIT kids is to encourage passions to the limit and dare to dream! And beyond that...have a backup plan.

 

 

Also, after posting it occurred to me to add something. This is one thing that we have not shared outside our immediate family, but perhaps it will lend credibility to what I've said. Ds applied early decision to MIT. In December, early admissions are announced. We were anxiously awaiting a letter when out of the blue, ds received a personal phone call from his admissions representative, informing him that he was officially admitted. He told ds that his application was one of the most outstanding he had ever read. Considering the courses ds took, his extra-curricular stuff, etc., this was (and is) a most shocking revelation. But again, I think it points to the idea of the person behind the transcript and the way he conveyed that in his app.

 

Congratulations!!! And yes, admissions people at highly selective schools have told me very similar things to what you wrote. It's nice to know it's true!

 

The grades and scores are a bar (hoop, whatever) to more or less allow a student to be looked at. Then they are looked at... with everyone having already passed the same bar.

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If a kid has drive and desire, passion for learning--those things are what make you "MIT-smart". Plus, many, many, MANY kids who have all the right stuff--grades, test scores, competitions, research--do NOT get accepted. I truly believe that MIT admits students based on what they bring to the table that is different and unique. They want to see that you have the ability and background to do the work; but beyond that, what is it about you that will bring a unique contribution to the class? No offense, but brainiacs are a dime a dozen for HYPS/MIT admissions staff. They want to see a person.

 

My advice to moms with aspiring MIT kids is to encourage passions to the limit and dare to dream! And beyond that...have a backup plan.

 

 

Lynne, I totally agree, & you say it far better than I am able. I just spent a long weekend working to greet admitted students and families at MIT along with the admissions staff. I went to parent's weekend at Stanford in February and listened to the chancellor tell us about how they admit kids. What these folks say over and over again is that academic smarts are important but not everything. Character counts a lot, too! Yes, they used that word. And they spoke about how they have to try to discern character from the kids' application essays, interviews, and recommendation letters. It's tough. I spent hours and hours writing my guidance counselor letters. I haven't shown them to anyone to date, not even the kids; they're that personal. I wrote about our journey and their character traits good and bad. For example, about dd's struggle with severe speech problems and how she was laughed at for being different in public school. She wants to run a school of her own some day, an alternative school which is welcoming to all, where everyone is accepted. Stuff like that.

 

The newly admitted kids I met last week at MIT illustrate that point. I can't remember one who wasn't nice, who didn't have a sparkle in his eyes, or who wasn't eager to talk about what interested him. No two alike! Yes, many of them could be labeled 'brainiacs,' but if they're anything like my kids they despise that kind of label. They just want to be with other kids who share their interests. My kids just want to be somewhere where they're average. :001_smile:

 

Also, after posting it occurred to me to add something. This is one thing that we have not shared outside our immediate family, but perhaps it will lend credibility to what I've said. Ds applied early decision to MIT. In December, early admissions are announced. We were anxiously awaiting a letter when out of the blue, ds received a personal phone call from his admissions representative, informing him that he was officially admitted. He told ds that his application was one of the most outstanding he had ever read. Considering the courses ds took, his extra-curricular stuff, etc., this was (and is) a most shocking revelation. But again, I think it points to the idea of the person behind the transcript and the way he conveyed that in his app.

 

That's wonderful, Lynne! I wish that I could meet your son. You've obviously done something wonderful in raising him. What a joy to hear something like that back from his admissions officer.

 

We probably have more commonalities than differences. MIT certainly wasn't on my son's radar before eleventh grade, either. He heard about it at summer camp and we visited on the drive home from Maine, traipsing across the concrete campus on a wickedly hot day with Grandma in tow. We didn't stress his getting in at all - I didn't know if it was possible in the first place. We'd always thought he'd go to U VA or VA Tech. Surprise! And it was even more of a shock to learn that MIT (or Stanford) was more affordable for us than our state colleges. My kids had offers from both and it was no comparison money-wise. We're solidly middle class, so I didn't think that would happen (but not upper middle class at all). My daughter did have MIT on her radar throughout high school, though. Once she saw her brother there, she wanted to follow, too. She was in love with MIT for four years; I spent four years with my heart in my throat thinking 'what have I done?!' :lol:

 

We as homeschoolers definitely have the advantage of the gift of time to help our kids follow their interests. And that's what helps them to stand out in college admissions (nice added side benefit!).

 

You know, most of the time I kind of regret posting that course list above. I surely didn't put it out there to dishearten anyone. It's not meant as bragging and I cringe inside that it might be taken that way...if you think it is, take a look at our history and English lists! We're typical WTM'ers there, and we owe a great big debt of thanks to Susan and Jessie for their help getting us through those subjects. I outsourced writing 'cause they fought me on it, and tears shed over essay writing aren't worth it IMHO.

 

And in no way, shape, or form were my kids made to take that schedule above. It was driven by them & their love of math, science, programming, Latin!! they didn't do it to impress me or anyone else or to get into MIT. They just loved it, plain and simple. They weren't tied to their desks -they had plenty of free time (some kids are just like that and are blessed with the ability to learn quickly). My biggest beef with dd in high school was all the time she wasted on Facebook:tongue_smilie: AP testing was free in my county then, while dual enrollment was costly and of lesser challenge for them. So we did APs. We did AoPS and math competitions because they were fun and cheap then, and they went to summer math camps which were expensive because they were the absolute highlights of their years (and we sacrificed, begged & borrowed to send them & they wrote scholarship essays & we lived for another year with the ratty old sofa:tongue_smilie:).

 

I spent hours this afternoon on Skype with my daughter trying to convince her to drop her honors math sequence (a notorious class that races through real analysis, multivariable calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, etc, in a deeply theoretical fashion on par with what I learned in grad school, but at a whirlwind pace). Yes ma'am, I, the mathematician, did that!;) And luckily succeeded, I think. It's been eating up way too much of her life since September. Even though her classmates are amazingly collaborative and not competitive, it's too much, too fast, too furious! What's the point? It's not a race. She's got a health issue that's aggravated by stress, boy drama (hard enough to adjust to dorm living after homeschooling, but add in boys...), and a part-time job & lots of extracurriculars that she loves to throw herself into head-first. And she's learning just as much from some of her leadership roles in those activities.

 

Our family is just a solitary data point. But I remember how much I loved reading about other homeschooler's college application adventures when my first was applying, and how much it helped me, so I offer up our story. And I still absolutely love to read everyone else's stories. All combined, I think that they do help parents out there who are reading and trying to figure out what route to explore for their own kids. I'm feeling kind of out of sorts tonight because of my dd's pain and my husband's endless job search, and it's helping me to write all this out. Maybe it will help someone else, maybe not!

Edited by Kathy in Richmond
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Our family is just a solitary data point. But I remember how much I loved reading about other homeschooler's college application adventures when my first was applying, and how much it helped me, so I offer up our story. And I still absolutely love to read everyone else's stories. All combined, I think that they do help parents out there who are reading and trying to figure out what route to explore for their own kids. I'm feeling kind of out of sorts tonight because of my dd's pain and my husband's endless job search, and it's helping me to write all this out. Maybe it will help someone else, maybe not!

 

Well, I'll be the first to thank you for writing it. As per the other thread, I'm still coming to grips with middle son wanting to go to an Ivy, but am thoroughly committed to letting him try. Your posts and descriptions are modifying some of my ingrained stereotypes. Middle son is a great kid. I guess my "fear" is of him turning into an elitist, and I fear him being the "poor kid" in a land of potential wealth - thus, not fitting in. In reality, I know he just wants to fit in at a school where he is more normal and doesn't have endure many of the "genius" comments. He loves academics and wants to be among like-minded students and profs. He wants to become a doctor or do medical research (if he doesn't change his mind).

 

I really like knowing there are other "not so wealthy" similar minded types of kids out there populating these schools. I'm sure there are still those who fit the stereotype (I've seen some of them post on cc), but if he can find a niche (wherever he goes), he will love it.

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We probably have more commonalities than differences.

 

You know, most of the time I kind of regret posting that course list above. I surely didn't put it out there to dishearten anyone. It's not meant as bragging and I cringe inside that it might be taken that way....

 

But I remember how much I loved reading about other homeschooler's college application adventures when my first was applying, and how much it helped me, so I offer up our story. And I still absolutely love to read everyone else's stories. All combined, I think that they do help parents out there who are reading and trying to figure out what route to explore for their own kids.

Oh Kathy, I absolutely believe we have more in common than not, even though our kids took different paths. None of what I wrote was directed at you or meant to suggest what your kids did wasn't in every way spectacular...and just what they wanted to be doing! And I think your posting of your course list is fabulous; you see already how many people have wanted that, and thanked you for it. And I certainly do NOT see it as bragging; it is your honest account of what they did. Would it have been discouraging to me? Well, probably. :blush: But I'm insecure that way.

 

The only reason I even poked my nose in is that I want people to realize the other side of it, so that even kids like mine who didn't do all the advanced things that yours did can still take heart that they might have a shot. That's not meant to take away from anything you said, in any way. I have the utmost respect for you, what you have shared, and what your kids have done and are doing.

 

Thanks for the sweet reply. You and the things you have shared are a gift to the others on the board.

 

p.s. About the counselor letter: this brought tears to my eyes. I could have written that word for word...so many hours spent, my very heart and soul poured into it. It is without question the most personal, most difficult thing I've ever written, and the thing I am most proud of doing for ds.

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Well, I'll be the first to thank you for writing it. As per the other thread, I'm still coming to grips with middle son wanting to go to an Ivy, but am thoroughly committed to letting him try. Your posts and descriptions are modifying some of my ingrained stereotypes. Middle son is a great kid. I guess my "fear" is of him turning into an elitist, and I fear him being the "poor kid" in a land of potential wealth - thus, not fitting in. In reality, I know he just wants to fit in at a school where he is more normal and doesn't have endure many of the "genius" comments. He loves academics and wants to be among like-minded students and profs. He wants to become a doctor or do medical research (if he doesn't change his mind).

 

I really like knowing there are other "not so wealthy" similar minded types of kids out there populating these schools. I'm sure there are still those who fit the stereotype (I've seen some of them post on cc), but if he can find a niche (wherever he goes), he will love it.

 

Your son sounds a lot like mine. Give Yale a chance - you never know what surprises are in store! But like the others said, have alternatives. My brother and I went to Case Western and U Rochester respectively, which I saw were also on your ds's list, & we received great educations and made good friends there, too. I just sort of wondered in the back of my mind all along whether or not I could have gotten into Caltech (my dream school way back when - I memorized the course catalog they sent me in grade 12 - sounded like heaven on earth). But it wasn't going to happen in my rural PA family. Three hours away from home was my parents' limit for me. I just didn't want to impose limits like that on my own kids, so I let them test the waters. I sense that you're doing the same with your boys. It's difficult when they're far from home and encounter problems (like they all do, of course), but they grow up and take care of things in a way you didn't think they were capable of doing.

 

About the socio-economic environment of these colleges: sure, there are lots of wealthy kids. One of my dd's classmates is Steve Jobs' son, for instance. But there are many, many kids from families like ours that are only there due to the ultra-generous financial aid policies! And my kids don't complain about being made to feel different on that account. They both work part-time, but so do many other students. Yeah, some kids go on fantastic trips over spring break, but many don't. Dd's dorm took all the kids to Lake Tahoe for the weekend last January - but since it was funded by the dorm, everyone got to go and enjoy. The only extra costs were for skiing, which dd opted out of (no surplus of $$), but so did about half the kids. They had a blast sledding and having snowball fights instead.

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Oh Kathy, I absolutely believe we have more in common than not, even though our kids took different paths. None of what I wrote was directed at you or meant to suggest what your kids did wasn't in every way spectacular...and just what they wanted to be doing! And I think your posting of your course list is fabulous; you see already how many people have wanted that, and thanked you for it. And I certainly do NOT see it as bragging; it is your honest account of what they did. Would it have been discouraging to me? Well, probably. :blush: But I'm insecure that way.

 

The only reason I even poked my nose in is that I want people to realize the other side of it, so that even kids like mine who didn't do all the advanced things that yours did can still take heart that they might have a shot. That's not meant to take away from anything you said, in any way. I have the utmost respect for you, what you have shared, and what your kids have done and are doing.

 

Thanks for the sweet reply. You and the things you have shared are a gift to the others on the board.

 

p.s. About the counselor letter: this brought tears to my eyes. I could have written that word for word...so many hours spent, my very heart and soul poured into it. It is without question the most personal, most difficult thing I've ever written, and the thing I am most proud of doing for ds.

 

Hi Lynne,

 

Thanks for your kind words this morning, too.:001_smile: It's been one of those weeks here. I love your son's story, too! I did remember about your writing once about the time and effort you put into your counselor letter, too. I'd like to think that was a gift we gave our kids and that it helped in some way to paint a picture of them so that the person reading it on the other end could somehow 'meet' the real person behind the transcript and scores. Yep, there is no correct path to get into MIT. It involves hard work for sure, but also some kind of internal drive within the kid himself - and a bit of luck.

 

Maybe some day we'll meet (I hope) up in Boston. My son is leaving soon for the real world, but I hope to keep volunteering there. It's been such a gift in his life that I want to keep giving back.

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I guess my "fear" is of him turning into an elitist, and I fear him being the "poor kid" in a land of potential wealth - thus, not fitting in.

 

Your son will likely retain many of the qualities he learned while growing up in your home. I grew up in rural Montana, and my friends tell me that they can take me out of Montana, but they can't take the Montana out of me. LOL. I hope that's a good thing! :)

Another thing to remember is that some of the wealthy kids do not come from loving homes with stability or wholesome values. A college friend of mine went to Exeter with one of the Getty boys, and his childhood was very sad. I also went to a university that had very wealthy kids and came away feeling sorry for some of the kids from wealthy homes.

Yale is a wonderful university. Definitely try to visit at least once and take a tour. Ask kids on the campus questions, too. Best of luck to your son!

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Your son sounds a lot like mine. Give Yale a chance - you never know what surprises are in store! But like the others said, have alternatives. My brother and I went to Case Western and U Rochester respectively, which I saw were also on your ds's list, & we received great educations and made good friends there, too. I just sort of wondered in the back of my mind all along whether or not I could have gotten into Caltech (my dream school way back when - I memorized the course catalog they sent me in grade 12 - sounded like heaven on earth). But it wasn't going to happen in my rural PA family. Three hours away from home was my parents' limit for me. I just didn't want to impose limits like that on my own kids, so I let them test the waters. I sense that you're doing the same with your boys. It's difficult when they're far from home and encounter problems (like they all do, of course), but they grow up and take care of things in a way you didn't think they were capable of doing.

 

About the socio-economic environment of these colleges: sure, there are lots of wealthy kids. One of my dd's classmates is Steve Jobs' son, for instance. But there are many, many kids from families like ours that are only there due to the ultra-generous financial aid policies! And my kids don't complain about being made to feel different on that account. They both work part-time, but so do many other students. Yeah, some kids go on fantastic trips over spring break, but many don't. Dd's dorm took all the kids to Lake Tahoe for the weekend last January - but since it was funded by the dorm, everyone got to go and enjoy. The only extra costs were for skiing, which dd opted out of (no surplus of $$), but so did about half the kids. They had a blast sleeding and having snowball fights instead.

 

Thanks for this. It really helps to read it to glean an insight. We've limited our kids to the Eastern half of the US, but even then, I told them if they found a college they liked farther away we could talk about it. I don't want to put limits on them in reality. So, youngest is considering Hawaii - and it just might be exactly the school for him. Who knows? He has a couple more years to ponder things and keep looking.

 

Middle son would be one of the kids with a job on campus - and little extra spending money.

 

Your son will likely retain many of the qualities he learned while growing up in your home. I grew up in rural Montana, and my friends tell me that they can take me out of Montana, but they can't take the Montana out of me. LOL. I hope that's a good thing! :)

.....

Yale is a wonderful university. Definitely try to visit at least once and take a tour. Ask kids on the campus questions, too. Best of luck to your son!

 

I do really hope the values we've instilled over the years will stay. Time will tell.

 

Pending the results next week, we will be planning a visit. It will likely be in the fall as I want him to see classes in action and he has a speech he can't miss (due to winning an essay contest) the only week we'd be able to travel later this month. Next month they'll be graduating at the colleges. We have to pick oldest up the first weekend.

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Guest VincentHomeNJ

Hi Vincent! I don't think that there's one correct way to go about this, or anything compulsary that all these schools are looking for. They're looking for a rigorous and challenging courseload overall, but I don't think that means that you have to do AP-level everything. It's better from my observations to have them do what they're truly interested in & to spend the rest of their time developing an area of talent/passion or getting them out in the community volunteering or working. And no, I don't think that any of the colleges we looked at said that US History was a specific requirement.

 

Hi Kathy, Thanks for the answering my question regarding the non-science classes that your kids took. And also want to let you know, your quality posts has helped us tremendously on planning my dd curriculum. Help cuts down our research time and gives us the confident that we are on the right track. For instance, we used to study NEM and which is not bad at all. But after reading your posts and a few others's recommendations on AoPS, I enrolled dd into AoPS classes and IMO the quality of AoPS are many times better than NEM. :iagree:

 

Vincent

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Hi Kathy, Thanks for the answering my question regarding the non-science classes that your kids took. And also want to let you know, your quality posts has helped us tremendously on planning my dd curriculum. Help cuts down our research time and gives us the confident that we are on the right track. For instance, we used to study NEM and which is not bad at all. But after reading your posts and a few others's recommendations on AoPS, I enrolled dd into AoPS classes and IMO the quality of AoPS are many times better than NEM. :iagree:

 

Vincent

 

Thank you for your kind words this morning, Vincent. I was glad to help, :) and I wish your daughter well in her studies. I hope that she enjoys AoPS as much as my kids did!

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