Jump to content

Menu

Plantar Fascitis--what has helped you?


Recommended Posts

My doc says motrin as a regimen plus ice scrubs twice daily are the cure. My experience has been that that is not a cure, just a mitigation. I want to get BETTER!

 

What I have found is that stretching my toes back considerably before standing, and wearing shoes with a slight heel rather than flats, and walking more on the balls of my feet than heel to toe are really helping me.

 

What else has helped you?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 127
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I have changed my body mechanics now to the point where not only has the PF not come back, but I have better balance and proprioception than ever before in my life.  The keys have been--switching almo

I lost 15 pounds. It went away. Totally! I did other things also, to avoid the shots and pharmaceuticals the doc wanted me to take, but I am convinced that the weight loss was essential to diminishing

Update:  Med Massager knocked out my injury-induced relapse into PF (thankfully just one foot, but really, really bad for 15 months) completely.  I think it improves circulation quickly to your feet s

I lost 15 pounds. It went away. Totally! I did other things also, to avoid the shots and pharmaceuticals the doc wanted me to take, but I am convinced that the weight loss was essential to diminishing the problem. I was about 155 lbs (5'2" tall), and lost down to just under 140#.

 

If you have a Wii, the Tilt Tables game on Wii Fit *really* helps to stretch out the bottom of my feet and keep that musculature from tensing up. Plus it's fun!

 

For other p.f. specific stretching exercises, a google search will turn up many good regimens. The trick is to start stretching before you get out of bed, and continue as you get up and around first thing in the moning.

 

Also, I bought a splint at CVS and slept with it. If I even feel a slight inkling that the pain is returning, I get it out again and use it for a couple of days. It was relatively inexpensive and worth every penny.

 

A great pair of shoes helps, too. Another place where your money will be well spent is a good sports shoe store. Ask for the manager to help you select shoes, or to refer you to a salesperson with experience in p.f.

 

That's been my experience, hope you find it helps. FWIW, when I first was told I had p.f., I was quite depressed about it, it was supposed to be a chronic condition and I felt I'd been given a life sentence of sorts. But a year later, here I am to tell you that there is hope!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Dd had this. I took her to a specialist, and he fitted her for a special foot splint like this. She wore it at night. The way it was explained to me is that when you sleep, your foot is pointed. Your heel begins to heal in that position, so when you wake up in the morning, it tears again when you flex your foot. Sleeping with your foot flexed will help it to heal in the flexed position, so it doesn't re-injure during the day.

 

If you lived close, I'd let you use the splint. I don't think the postage from Canada would be worth it.:001_smile: It's just sitting in my closet, collecting dust. Maybe you can rig something that will have the same result.

 

HTH,

Lori

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I stopped going barefoot around the house/up the stairs. I went to a sporting goods store and bought a really good pair of tennis shoes. I wore them constantly for a month or two. I haven't had a problem since. I'm now back to going barefoot.:lol: My problems were pretty severe and this helped pretty quickly.

 

Paula

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm....let's see...

When the pain was very acute, I'd sleep with ice packs wrapped around my feet at night. Takes a little getting used to, but it did help.

 

I started wearing Crocs knockoffs during the day with really stiff and high arch supports in them.

 

When I had to go out, Skechers seemed to be the most comfy by far (don't know exactly why, because they're not incredibly supportive)

 

Making a point of stretching gently before getting out of bed, or even before standing up from my chair.

 

Since I spend a lot of time in the kitchen, both at home and professionally, I added cushy mats to the areas where I spent the most time standing.

 

It took a year and a half, but I'm almost to a complete recovery.

If I had to pinpoint which of the things I listed was the most effective, I think it would have to be the continuous use of high and very stiff arch supports. Uncomfortable as all get-out in the beginning, but I think that is what made the difference in my recovery.

 

It's incredible just how painful the condition can become, and just how much it can drag you down and drag away the joy of daily life. So....:grouphug::grouphug:.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It took 1 1/2 years of stretching, ice packs and shoes with high arch

support. I have a coffee table in front of my den couch and any time I would be watching a tv show or dvd, I would stretch the achilles tendon on my foot repeatedly off an on for sometimes an hour. Intermittently, I would put my heel on a dedicated (to heel therapy) frozen bag of peas until it started to thaw. The stretching and the cold from the peas were the secret to the healing and the arch support in the shoes was the next benefit. I started wearing Birkenstock cork/latex insole sandals and cloggs that mold with the heat and preassure of your body to a custom orthotic. I also now have shoes I bought with a similar cork insole at a place in Atlanta called Foot Solutions. They custom fit the shoes you buy from them with a cork insole just for your foot style. I need a good arch support. The shoes I wear from there are leather cloggs and I can replace the cork/latex insole when needed. They are expensive initially but have lasted two years without an insole replacement. I never limp or have to crawl to the bathroom in the middle of the night as before. I have been pain free for over 3 years.:) I also had the foot brace for wearing at night but couldn't get used to it and it tangled in the blanket. You could also use a belt to stretch your foot if you don't have a solid coffee table as I do or stand on steps and let your heels drop down. Start with 5-8 and work up to as many as you can do several times a day with ice (frozen peas) in between. Be patient. It takes time for this injury to heal but it will eventually heal. Don't go barefoot. I am originally a Tennessee Hillbilly so I did go barefoot until this foot injury and have learned my lesson.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dd had this. I took her to a specialist, and he fitted her for a special foot splint like this. She wore it at night. The way it was explained to me is that when you sleep, your foot is pointed. Your heel begins to heal in that position, so when you wake up in the morning, it tears again when you flex your foot. Sleeping with your foot flexed will help it to heal in the flexed position, so it doesn't re-injure during the day.

 

If you lived close, I'd let you use the splint. I don't think the postage from Canada would be worth it.:001_smile: It's just sitting in my closet, collecting dust. Maybe you can rig something that will have the same result.

 

HTH,

Lori

 

My dh has those. It really did the trick. He is also flat-footed, as most people with plantar fasciitis are. The other thing he did was to get inserts for his shoes and boots. They are custom made and he says worth every penny.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I've lost weight, it goes away. In the mean time, I bought an expensive pair of flip-flops (about $50) at REI, that has a lot of arch support, and I wear them non-stop. (I live in a warm climate, so I prefer open shoes.) I've had them 3 years, and they're still working.

Link to post
Share on other sites

These exercises have helped many with pf (and I agree with losing weight...about 75-80 % of people with plantar fascitis are overweight):

 

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-241-286--11327-0,00.html'>http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-241-286--11327-0,00.html

 

Here are some more: http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-241-286--11327-0,00.html

 

Orthotics/inserts are only a temporary solution and the right stretching and strengthening will help much more over time. I think you can also find instructions online for taping your arches in a specific way to help temporarily. Be sure not to overdo it with walking or running while working on this, though. You may have to stop altogether.

Link to post
Share on other sites

honestly? It took time. I was in pain, severe pain for about 2 years. I had a few cortisone shots and had really nice tennis shoes. It went away. But it was time. I even had the thing to sleep in but I couldn't sleep, lol, so I didn't use it much. I can now wear any shoe I want(YAY!) but in small doses. But for me it was just time to heal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had it for years in my left foot... then in one fatal move (bending over 'funny' to pick up a baby blanket) I blew a disk in my back AND ruptured the fascia in my left foot! I actually felt AND heard the rip!

 

I avoided surgery but I was not allowed to put ANY weight on my foot for over 10 months (wheel chair and crutches were my life!). The good news is that I will NEVER have plantar fasciitis again in my left foot.

 

A few years of physical therapy did not help my back so I had back surgery this past summer (immediate pain relief!)... but I was forced to sleep on my back for 5 months after the surgery...it aggravated the fascia in my RIGHT foot... now it is swollen to over 1 inch and I'm walking on shattered glass ALL THE TIME!!!

 

I'm very very close to asking for surgery--but it is one of the MOST PAINFUL recoveries--6 weeks on average--but you CAN put weight on your 'boot' while you recover...

 

Custom orthotics really helped--and proper fitting shoes are a MUST.

 

Croc's makes an RX version (crocs.com) that is AWESOME--I've worn my old pair out and I'm ordering a new pair. My Dr wears these all the time in her office!

 

I really feel for you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

When it was flared up at it's worst, icing/ibuprofen/stretching/never walking barefoot only helped so much. Inserts from the the podiatrist along with a good pair of running shoes helped a lot, but the best shoes I've found are the pair of Merrills I'm in now without inserts.

 

The other thing that helped was my kids growing up and not needing to be picked up or carried any longer. Plantar facitis and a very large infant with chronic ear infections were not a good mix.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Foot exercises/ice/stretching alone won't take care of the problem for me. I believe that I develop spasms or trigger points in my soleus muscle (lower calf), that then pulls on my achilles tendon, and my plantar fascia. Massage would help work out the muscle contractions, but I use the methods described at this website. You don't have to buy their products--I've discovered that my dog's tough chew tennis ball works just fine :lol:.

 

http://www.tptherapy.com/achilles.php?id=54

 

Beth

Link to post
Share on other sites
Arch support. For a while I used fancy, expensive, made-by-a-podiatrist orthotic inserts. Now I go with the much cheaper and just as effective route of OTC WalkFit arch supports. I get them at Target for $20.

 

:iagree: Dh bought some WalkFit arch supports after seeing the infomercial. He was desperate! They work great! I didn't know you could find them at Target.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dansko shoes (the professional clogs)... I put them on the minute I wake up and take them off when I get into bed.

 

Last spring, I had an awful case of plantar fasciitis. My sister-in-law has worn Danskos for years. I finally bought a pair. WOW!!! Within a week, my pain was gone. It is amazing. I bought a pair of their sandals last spring and they were great as well. I also have a pair of ECCO sandals that I can wear and rinse off. They're also great.

 

The entire experience has taught me that good shoes are worth the money. If my feet don't feel good it affects my whole body.

 

Good luck! I hope you receive some relief soon.

 

Val

Link to post
Share on other sites
Inserts, stretches, and if I don't want inserts, Berkies.

Birkenstocks saved me. I had it SO bad in my left foot and it's still sore sometimes. I have my Birks, and some insoles for my tennies that I got at a custom shop. I also am about to invest in a cute pair of Dansko clogs that I can wear to church. That's my biggest thing is finding cute church shoes!

 

I absolutely never go barefoot anymore except in the shower. For me it's about the arch support, but not 100% about that. I have found that the reason my Birks and my inserts are so great is that bump in the middle of the shoe/insert, right behind where the ball of my foot would be, right where the tendon attaches. I am bad at this, but I think it's a metatarsil (sp?) support. If a shoe has a decent art support but not this bump for the metatarsil, forget it. Also, for me if it's too soft a shoe - like a Croc - forget it. I seem to have to have a pretty rigid footbed.

 

Loves me some Birks! Besides, I think it enhances my crunchy, granola, homeschool mom image I like to have sometimes!;)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
. I also have a pair of ECCO sandals that I can wear and rinse off. They're also great.

 

The entire experience has taught me that good shoes are worth the money. If my feet don't feel good it affects my whole body.

 

 

I have two colors of Casual Buillon with the Buckles. They are pretty flat, and they have cushy insoles and also a wide toebox which is nice for my tendency toward hammer toes. But whenever I wear them, my feet go into spasms or something! It's the same with my Sofft flats--I have concluded that I can't wear most dress flats.

 

Still, I should probably try those sandals on at least--do you happen to know which ones they are?

 

Also, I think that those professional clogs might have just the right amount of heel--or maybe the Sally's, with just a bit more heel, would be better.

Thank you!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Birkenstocks saved me. I had it SO bad in my left foot and it's still sore sometimes. I have my Birks, and some insoles for my tennies that I got at a custom shop.

I absolutely never go barefoot anymore except in the shower. For me it's about the arch support, but not 100% about that. I have found that the reason my Birks and my inserts are so great is that bump in the middle of the shoe/insert, right behind where the ball of my foot would be, right where the tendon attaches. I am bad at this, but I think it's a metatarsil (sp?) support. If a shoe has a decent art support but not this bump for the metatarsil, forget it)

 

I have to look for that bump, I guess. I had Birks years ago and the bump actually bothered me--if I wore them barefoot, it would give me hives on the bottom of my feet. But desperate times call for desperate measures, and at my current weight, with longer feet than before, maybe I need to give these another try.

Link to post
Share on other sites
When I've lost weight, it goes away. In the mean time, I bought an expensive pair of flip-flops (about $50) at REI, that has a lot of arch support, and I wear them non-stop. (I live in a warm climate, so I prefer open shoes.) I've had them 3 years, and they're still working.

 

Which sandals did you gte at REI? We have REI around here, and it is just great. I don't have ANY sandals that are really comfortable for me anymore. The flats are too flat. The heeled ones make me feel like not walking. I really do need some sandals that are pretty flat that I can wear barefoot. Since I started having this problem, most of the time when I once would have worn sandals I now wear running or aerobic shoes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Arch support. For a while I used fancy, expensive, made-by-a-podiatrist orthotic inserts. Now I go with the much cheaper and just as effective route of OTC WalkFit arch supports. I get them at Target for $20.

 

We have Target around here, and it sounds like getting these would be a great initial move.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My Dad had this (not overweight AT ALL--he goes to the gym 1-2 times/day, eat healthily and bikes all over the place--healthiest I've ever seen him! :D) and has one of those foot brace things. What really helped him more than anything, though, was staying very hydrated. He was told at his health-food store that the best thing for plantar fasciitis is to drink a significant amount of water. The formula is as follows:take your body weight, divide that by 2, then drink that number of ounces of water a day. (eg someone who weighs 160 lbs. should drink 80 oz. of water/day) Totally took away all of his pain. :001_huh: Might be worth trying--drinking plenty of water isn't going to hurt, even if it doesn't work for you! (Dh adds that it takes 3 days of drinking plenty of water to fully hydrate, so if you haven't been in the habit of drinking much water, keep that in mind.) Hope you find some pain relief soon.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Dd had this. I took her to a specialist, and he fitted her for a special foot splint like this. She wore it at night. The way it was explained to me is that when you sleep, your foot is pointed. Your heel begins to heal in that position, so when you wake up in the morning, it tears again when you flex your foot. Sleeping with your foot flexed will help it to heal in the flexed position, so it doesn't re-injure during the day.

 

 

This makes a lot of sense. Maybe I'll start by trying ace bandages, which I already own. I do stretch my feet in the morning before standing down onto them, and that really helps a lot, but your explanation of why not to let your feet point during the night sounds important.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I started wearing only tennis shoe type shoes and don't go barefoot at all. I also stretch a lot, ice, and take ibuprofen. I have tried the special sleeping sock, but can't sleep well that way. Mine was exacerbated by my high miles as a jogger, so I took about six months off of jogging. It isn't 100 percent better, but it has definitely improved.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine finally went away when I got serious about nightly icing sessions, stretching my feet before I get out of bed, and wearing these running shoes -- http://www.pearlizumi.com/product.php?mode=view&pc_id=91&product_id=1364301&outlet= you can actually find them on ebay for about half the cost, but in last year's colors ;) They were recommended by the local running shop sales gal, and they are much better than the New Balance my ortho doc had recommended.

 

Also, I started going on short walks, in my new shoes ;), and concentrated on rolling heel-to-toe. I've been pain free for 3 years now, and when I do feel like it might be flaring up I just go back to the icing & wearing only my Pearl Izumi's for a few days until I'm better. Otherwise, I pretty much wear whatever shoes I want to (even a little barefoot in the house!!)

Link to post
Share on other sites
In my case, I felt better quickly. It didn't get worse--it got steadily better. Others' experience may be different though.

 

So the first try is underway. I had to put the orthotics into 4 different pairs of shoes before I found the right ones--the flats I wanted to use were too shallow so the orthotics lifted me right out of them with every step--picture flats acting like heavy flip flops, and you have the idea. Anyway, I have them in another pair of flats, and it's going well! I'm using the lowest arch supports as the medium ones felt like they were too high.

 

Do you use these in running shoes as well? Do you buy a certain kind without a lot of support so that they are complemented by the inserts?

 

The package says to wear them for an hour the first day, and gradually increase the time, but as I'm sitting a lot, I'm not following that. One interesting thing is that I have not risen to my feet and been immediately in pain as much as normal, so I think that they are truly helping.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Do you use these in running shoes as well? Do you buy a certain kind without a lot of support so that they are complemented by the inserts?

 

 

I wear these inserts in all my shoes, including my exercise shoes.

 

I buy gym shoes based on whether or not they will fit the orthotic without that annoying heel slippage, and based on how flexible the sole is. A nice, flexible sole allows the foot to move more naturally.

 

I have been known to remove the shoe insole and just wear the orthotic insert.

 

Glad it seems to be helping--hope it feels better soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have two colors of Casual Buillon with the Buckles. They are pretty flat, and they have cushy insoles and also a wide toebox which is nice for my tendency toward hammer toes. But whenever I wear them, my feet go into spasms or something! It's the same with my Sofft flats--I have concluded that I can't wear most dress flats.

 

Still, I should probably try those sandals on at least--do you happen to know which ones they are?

 

Also, I think that those professional clogs might have just the right amount of heel--or maybe the Sally's, with just a bit more heel, would be better.

Thank you!

 

 

Carol,

 

I just looked up which Eccos I have and they are called Ecco Lauca. I love them. I am continuously surprised that my feet don't hurt because they are more flat, but so far, so good.

 

The professional clogs have a great design and wonderful construction. They also have the following:

Dansko’s Stapled Clog Collection proudly carries the Seal of Acceptance from the American Podiatric Medical Association

 

My feet smile when I wear them.

 

I hope you are able to get some relief.

 

Val

Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the shoe inserts for arch support and I made an effort to stay off it as much as possible for at least a week. It is tough to do that when you are a busy mom, but I was in miserable pain and needed it to stop. I also took Ibuprofen and had my dh rub my foot because it felt so good to have it massaged!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I get up and my feet do not hurt. And they were triggered, badly, just two days ago! I get up and I don't have to stretch my feet first and they do not hurt. This is feeling so good. Wow.

 

(I did not realize how irritating this whole thing had become until I felt so much better. This is so cool!)

 

(These shoes that I fit the WalkFit's into are really, really ugly. I foresee a foray into a shoe store to find one cute pair that these inserts fit really well. After I try them in every single pair of shoes I have, just in case. But I think that they are going to push me out to a wide size or maybe a half size up. And it is SO worth it!)

Edited by Carol in Cal.
Link to post
Share on other sites
I get up and my feet do not hurt. And they were triggered, badly, just two days ago! I get up and I don't have to stretch my feet first and they do not hurt. This is feeling so good. Wow.

 

(I did not realize how irritating this whole thing had become until I felt so much better. This is so cool!)

 

(These shoes that I fit the WalkFit's into are really, really ugly. I foresee a foray into a shoe store to find one cute pair that these inserts fit really well. After I try them in every single pair of shoes I have, just in case. But I think that they are going to push me out to a wide size or maybe a half size up. And it is SO worth it!)

 

:party:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Consistent attention to stretching my achilles.

 

...until I started this thread I never had any idea that one's Achilles' tendon had anything to do with this problem. I thought it was all about stretching your toes back. But the connection with that tendon is consistent with another recurrent problem that I tend to get when I run, which is shin splints. Those are another thing that counterintuitively is contributed to by insufficient stretching of the back of the calf and Achilles' tendon. So some of the general stretching that I'm adding to my daily routine is going to include stretching this area, from now on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I put the Walk Fit orthotics into some of the flat shoes I have that KILL my feet, and wore them all day. The line across the toes is tighter than normal, which is reasonable since the orthotics take up some space. But my feet do not hurt other than that! This is just amazing.

 

Strider, thank you again. This is saving my life, really. I'm doing a happy dance, and it doesn't HURT!

Link to post
Share on other sites
I put the Walk Fit orthotics into some of the flat shoes I have that KILL my feet, and wore them all day. The line across the toes is tighter than normal, which is reasonable since the orthotics take up some space. But my feet do not hurt other than that! This is just amazing.

 

Strider, thank you again. This is saving my life, really. I'm doing a happy dance, and it doesn't HURT!

 

I am just sooooo tickled at how well this has worked for you. I'm glad you're feeling better!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...