Jump to content

Menu

What is the best way to teach yourself things you didn't learn in high school?


Guest AJK
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi there. I'm new here and learning the site as I go. I was publicly schooled all my life and I've never really really self-taught myself subject matter. I'm currently going on my second semester in my first year of college without foundations in the (4)areas below.

 

For me that would be:

 

Chemistry

Physics

Calculus

Pre-Calculus

 

Could you provide great links?

Could you tell me effective ways of instilling the knowledge?

 

Also any detailed advice on how to be self taught and teach yourself these things is much appreciated.

 

I will visit every link.

 

Also, I think the full fledged thing might be, not sure, but could be harder to grasp than an introductory course in these subjects.

 

Actually I think algebra and trig are more familiar so just the pre-calc intro course would be sufficient.

 

I can't wait to learn physics and chemistry.

 

Baby steps, thanks.:seeya:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there. I'm new here and learning the site as I go. I was publicly schooled all my life and I've never really really self-taught myself subject matter. I'm currently going on my second semester in my first year of college without foundations in the (4)areas below.

 

For me that would be:

 

Chemistry

Physics

Calculus

Pre-Calculus

 

Could you provide great links?

Could you tell me effective ways of instilling the knowledge?

 

Also any detailed advice on how to be self taught and teach yourself these things is much appreciated.

 

I will visit every link.

 

Also, I think the full fledged thing might be, not sure, but could be harder to grasp than an introductory course in these subjects.

 

Actually I think algebra and trig are more familiar so just the pre-calc intro course would be sufficient.

 

I can't wait to learn physics and chemistry.

 

Baby steps, thanks.:seeya:

 

 

 

 

 

 

I just want to fill in the gaps here:

 

From what I've found out, it is usually the case that someone have some background in calculus or at least pre-calculus material before entering an introductory physics course whether it be high school or college. Is this correct?

 

I think it is important to know that I have taken math A and math B in high school. I'm not entirely sure what the specifics are, in terms of content, but I do not think they are courses at the pre-calculus level. What are common names for math A and B in other terms or laments terms?

 

I am now in my first year of college (ironically in a math&science liberal arts associate program) without having a great foundation of math and an even worse foundation in science, seeing how I didn't take a chemistry or physics course at the high school level.

 

I live in NY state and I got a regular regents diploma (not advanced) which means I made the credit requirement in the necessary areas. To explain my lack of background knowledge I will say that for credit:

 

Science 9-12: living environment (biology), earth science, and forensics.

 

Math 9-12: 9-don't remember, 10-don't remember, 11-math A, 12-math B.

 

First semester I took: College Algebra

Psychology, Critical Thinking, Fitness(gym/pe), Western Civilization, and Freshman Composition.

 

This semester (not set in stone): College Trigonometry, College Physics, Intoduction to Literature, American Government, and International Relations.

 

I don't think I'm ready for College Physics, it's the only core course open this semester.

 

I need help! If there was a way I could go back in time and take all the high school courses I need and jump back to now, I would!

 

I'm interested in the sciences and even slightly in the maths, well that's not all but I do think the career prospects resulting in an education with a strong background in both has caught my eye.

 

Any help is much appreciated. I know It's a long question but all of it is important!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My background - I have a physics major (never used it and forgot most of it!) and experience as a tutor for CC freshman biology and chemistry. BTW, I not take calculus, chemistry, or physics in high school.

Algebra is fundamental for both College Chemistry and College Physics.

If your are looking at science / math majors, the Physics you need will probably be calculus based - it might be called something like "Majors Physics" or "Engineering Physics" - just check to see what math is required (algebra for college physics or calculus for majors physics). College Physics is usually not required for Majors Physics.

Trigonometry is required for both physics (college & majors) and calculus.

One piece of advice for chemistry, physics, and math: work ALL problems (that you can get the answer for) in the text and any available study guides, whether assigned or not. Check your answers - if you can't check your answer you cannot tell if you are working it properly. Try to go through and work them a 2nd and even a 3rd time. Working problems is crucial to success. Work every day, including weekends. Many shorter study periods are much more beneficial than fewer longer sessions.

For the memory-type work (definitions, etc.) - I recommend flashcards - see this site:

http://faculty.valenciacc.edu/jbivins/Class_Notes_PDFs/How_to_Study.pdf

Many universities have study helps available, through specific departments or through a university learning / tutoring center. Check these out for ideas:

http://www.chem.tamu.edu/academics/fyp/student_resources.php

http://www.chem.tamu.edu/academics/fyp/toward_success/Toward_Success.pdf

http://www.chem.tamu.edu/academics/fyp/student_resources.php

http://www.utexas.edu/student/utlc/

DO NOT get behind. Math, chemistry, and physics build foundations, if you miss the beginning, you cannot build the middle, if the miss the middle you cannot build the top. This applies with both single courses and with subsequent courses.

In my experience, both as a student and as a tutor, WORK PROBLEMS, WORK PROBLEMS, and WORK PROBLEMS some more!

Best wishes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another thought for flashcards:

 

Don't waste your money buying pre-made flashcards.

 

Make your own flashcards; you will get MUCH of the benefit just in the making of them, whether or not you reivew them.

 

Doing the work yourself - writing notes, working problems, making flashcards, etc. is active learning as opposed to passive learning such as reading (including highlighting) the text and thinking about the concepts. Active learning is more useful than passive learning. Use active learning as much as possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I wanted to learn physics and chem as an adult, I would read the Conceptual Physics and Conceptual Chemistry books (Hewitt and company). If I had to do math, I would get a math book and work through it. If I had no money, I would use the library to get these books. For foreign languages, I like the Pimsleur tapes and then reading books and trying to find people to talk to. For literature, I like TWEM. For life sciences and history, I like using the library to get "living" books (especially natural history) and Teaching Company and PBS lectures. If I am too lost to watch or read the specifics of something, I tend to go for the Idiot's or Dummy books as a quick, easy-to-read overview before I dive into a book or program on a particular subject. In general, I find survey courses boring, so I try to get into the specifics on one thing quickly. If it is something hands-on, I try to find someone to show me. If I can't manage that, I get a book from the library. I know this isn't exactly what you asked, but it might be helpful, anyway. I do lots of self-educating and have my whole life, in all sorts of things, and I've found these to be ways that I actually will do. That is the tricky bit. I'm not trying to pass tests or get the pre-req's for other classes, though; I'm just trying to satisfy my own curiosity.

 

You could look at the Texas state college/university sites for free on-line info, or at hippocampus, or the free MIT courses (open course-ware? open sourceware? something like that).

-Nan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...