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Plaid Dad and Latin/Greek connoisseurs...


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I have a friend who wants to know:

 

1. Memoria Press/Highlands Latin: what they cover in their daily chanting time? Does anyone know? If no one knows, what do YOU cover in your daily chanting, if you do this?

 

2. Greek to Latin, Latin to Greek translation material for younger students, elementary-middle age?

 

3. Drew, she wants to know about speaking Latin conversationally, whether you do this and what your recommendations are. She has older children (and younger) and her oldest have gone through Henle II, one son is working through Wheelock's.

 

Thanks in advance to anyone who can provide answers! I sure can't, lol!

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I have a friend who wants to know:

 

1. Memoria Press/Highlands Latin: what they cover in their daily chanting time? Does anyone know? If no one knows, what do YOU cover in your daily chanting, if you do this?

 

Here's a link that should answer the first question. It's an article from Memoria Press on how to conduct a Latin Recitation. http://www.memoriapress.com/articles/Latin-Recitation.html

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2. Greek to Latin, Latin to Greek translation material for younger students, elementary-middle age?

 

I don't know of any prepared curriculum for this. My inclination would be to use this book alongside this bilingual NT and have students translate individual verses back and forth. The Gibbs book arranges verses by their grammatical structures, so the parent could use it as a guide to make sure the verses they chose did not contain grammatical concepts the student had not yet encountered.

 

3. Drew, she wants to know about speaking Latin conversationally, whether you do this and what your recommendations are.

 

At that level, Lingua Latina would be the best choice. They would already know a good deal of the grammar. I would have them read the text and then answer questions like those in Pensum C of each chapter orally. There are other sets of questions in the Exercitia book that could also be done orally.

 

Other than that, the usual resource for spoken Latin is Traupman's Conversational Latin for Oral Proficiency. I actually don't find it as helpful as Lingua Latina for getting started, but it does have a large lexicon that includes Neo-Latin words if you really want to do conversational Latin (as opposed to oral drill in Latin).

 

HTH!

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