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Shutting the barn door after the horse has bolted--ya think DHS has heard that?


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It really boggles my mind how DHS is reacting to the (thankfully) averted terrorism: new rule that would have prevented the tragedy--just like after the guy put explosives in his shoes, there were new rules .

 

This doesn't give great cause for confidence: wait to see what someone tries to do next and then make it against the rules. One would think that someone could think through the various possibilities and the rules would have been in place from 9/11 on... why wait for the next thing...then the next...always closing the barn door behind the horse... I guess there are other horses in there, but still.

 

How about figuring out how the guy got through security in London? That kind of tracing things backward would actually be useful.

 

Is there some rational reason for this reactive nature of the security precautions? Am I missing something?

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I'll admit I was slack-jawed when I heard Homeland Security Chief Janet Napolitano on Sunday morning suggesting the system had "worked". Yikes!

 

The fall-out from those remarks is hardly surprising (and well-deserved). She (of course) is back-tracking now, and I hope this near-tragedy will lead to a real security review, and policy enhancements (rather than just "theater").

 

Thank goodness this wasn't the disaster it could have been!

 

Bill

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I'll admit I was slack-jawed when I heard Homeland Security Chief Janet Napolitano on Sunday morning suggesting the system had "worked". Yikes!

 

The fall-out from those remarks is hardly surprising (and well-deserved). She (of course) is back-tracking now, and I hope this near-tragedy will lead to a real security review, and policy enhancements (rather than just "theater").

 

Thank goodness this wasn't the disaster it could have been!

 

Bill

 

Oh my goodness, she really said that?!!

 

I can't imagine being one of the passengers on that plane and knowing that the only reason I'm alive is because the bomber on my plane is too stupid to make a bomb that works. I think I would have spent Christmas Day in the fetal position.

 

Dh read that the guy (with help from some well-spoken man in a suit) talked his way onto the plane WITHOUT A PASSPORT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Edited by LizzyBee
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...meanwhile, in an attempt to avoid racial profiling, they'll continue to pull grandmas out of security checkpoint lines.

 

(Sorry, personal peeve here.)

 

Oh good grief! Isn't that the truth?:banghead: It'll never ever be fixed unless they stop this ridiculousness.

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I'll admit I was slack-jawed when I heard Homeland Security Chief Janet Napolitano on Sunday morning suggesting the system had "worked". Yikes!

 

The fall-out from those remarks is hardly surprising (and well-deserved). She (of course) is back-tracking now, and I hope this near-tragedy will lead to a real security review, and policy enhancements (rather than just "theater").

 

Thank goodness this wasn't the disaster it could have been!

 

Bill

 

She did nothing for us in AZ. I expected nothing when she went to the Whitehouse, so this surprises me.....not. But then she changed her mind. I couldn't believe she was the "pick" for this position.

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...meanwhile, in an attempt to avoid racial profiling, they'll continue to pull grandmas out of security checkpoint lines.

 

(Sorry, personal peeve here.)

 

 

Why does this peeve you? If you are truly concerned about security, why should anyone be above suspicion? I think every single person getting on a plane should be thoroughly checked no matter their age, sex or nationality.

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Why does this peeve you? If you are truly concerned about security, why should anyone be above suspicion? I think every single person getting on a plane should be thoroughly checked no matter their age, sex or nationality.

 

 

Because little old ladies and homeschool moms and a lot of other "profiles" do not blow up planes, or strap bombs to their backs and climb on board buses, or in general terrorize others.

 

I am more "mildly" than "truly" concerned about security, otherwise I'd completely avoid going out in public. However, I do take precautions (lock my car doors at night, avoid walking in "bad" neighborhoods, be aware of my surroundings). I don't have a problem with the idea of precautions re airport security. But as in so many activities where the gov't is involved, I think the way they go about it stupid.

 

(Wow, the whole set up of that paragraph is appalling, but I don't have time to reword/rephrase it!)

 

I think "profiling" should be realistic if it is to be done at all; the alternative, imo, is to operate along the lines of El Al, but I don't know if I'm personally ready for that either.

 

There is a lot involved, and there is no perfect answer.

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Speaking as one who was pulled for extra checks for 2+ years it would be nice if they came up with some better ways. Luckily for me, the person who had my name on the terrorist watch list must have been caught or something, b/c the last two times I flew, I went through the normal checks. I have to say it is rather invasive and embarrassing they way the paw through your pocketbook and pad you down. Never knew about the x-rays that show you naked. :eek:

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It's simple. Dogs. I don't know why they're not used more.

 

Give me a variety of samples of explosives, a food/play motivated dog from a pound and a month. I'll give you back a pretty darn reliable screening device that will work for a game of tug or a liver brownie.

 

astrid

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It's simple. Dogs. I don't know why they're not used more.

 

Give me a variety of samples of explosives, a food/play motivated dog from a pound and a month. I'll give you back a pretty darn reliable screening device that will work for a game of tug or a liver brownie.

 

astrid

 

 

Oh Astrid! Silly girl... that's far too reasonable and inexpensive. ;)

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security found my corkscrew/swiss army knife in my purse - trashed - on the way to San Diego and my son's toothpaste - trashed - and contact solution - allowed after bomb sniffer - on the way back (and by the way, the son doesn't go to secondary - the mother does!).

 

Upon reflection, this probably doesn't make anyone feel better - but what the heck???? Why are they so good at finding this stuff and the important stuff???

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I'll admit I was slack-jawed when I heard Homeland Security Chief Janet Napolitano on Sunday morning suggesting the system had "worked". Yikes!

 

The fall-out from those remarks is hardly surprising (and well-deserved). She (of course) is back-tracking now, and I hope this near-tragedy will lead to a real security review, and policy enhancements (rather than just "theater").

 

Thank goodness this wasn't the disaster it could have been!

 

Bill

 

Wasn't that unbelievable! "The system" must have included a Dutch guy instinctively leaping over other passengers to grab the thing and put it out before it exploded.

 

Why would an official say something like that? It was ridiculous and did a lot to lower, rather than raise, confidence.

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But if they used bomb-sniffing dogs, that would discriminate against those who fear dogs. :glare:

 

I got chosen for the extra security screening back when traveling alone with a toddler. It was such fun trying to get through the process (folding the stroller to fit on the belt, putting the car seat up there, too, all while trying to remove my shoes and those of my toddler as he tried to get away....and then putting it all back together with no help!).

 

My sister is a flight attendant, so I'm all for stronger security measures. (Bring on the dogs!!!) But save the extra screening for those statistically most likely to commit such a crime. A frazzled mom wrangling an 18 month old baby isn't likely to have put bombs in the soles of his tiny little shoes.

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...meanwhile, in an attempt to avoid racial profiling, they'll continue to pull grandmas out of security checkpoint lines.

 

Because of their jobs, my parents travel many thousands of air miles a year all over the world and my 60-year-old Irish mother is pulled for extra security scans more than half of the time. Literally.

 

I agree - ridiculous.

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