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My six-year-old is making it abundantly clear to me lately that he gets work done cheerfully and fast, and even learns better, when I give him the resources to teach himself. (His fantasy homeschool is a checklist, a stack of books, and a place to be alone.) Is there a colorful self-teaching book that goes over the math topic he needs to master next, subtraction and addition with regrouping (or second grade)? I was actually looking at texts used in schools, Harcourt & McGrawHill, because the explanations are always in those, step-by-step, and they're colorful enough for the kiddo to enjoy. Developmental Math would be perfect if only it was in color.

 

I will continue using RightStart with him daily, but I'm inclined to indulge his request for "a math book that explains things to me, like with pictures, so I can do it by myself."

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My 6 yo son is the same , he likes to learn by himself and he is doing great . I explain only new concepts He is doing Horizons book 2 and Singapore 1B and he is almost done with both of them so I will give CLE math a try. I heard it is very independent and an excellent program.

 

CLE does not have color though .

Horizons is colorful and very independent but it is not too good in concepts (more memorization than understanding the whys) which should not be a problem if you supplement with RS.

I have some of the math books the PS are using and they look colorful and fun but for some reason I don't like them .

Edited by blessedmom3
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My six-year-old is making it abundantly clear to me lately that he gets work done cheerfully and fast, and even learns better, when I give him the resources to teach himself. (His fantasy homeschool is a checklist, a stack of books, and a place to be alone.) Is there a colorful self-teaching book that goes over the math topic he needs to master next, subtraction and addition with regrouping (or second grade)? I was actually looking at texts used in schools, Harcourt & McGrawHill, because the explanations are always in those, step-by-step, and they're colorful enough for the kiddo to enjoy. Developmental Math would be perfect if only it was in color.

 

I will continue using RightStart with him daily, but I'm inclined to indulge his request for "a math book that explains things to me, like with pictures, so I can do it by myself."

 

I think that is a riot:) For my ds , I pretty much have to be there;)

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My six-year-old is making it abundantly clear to me lately that he gets work done cheerfully and fast, and even learns better, when I give him the resources to teach himself. (His fantasy homeschool is a checklist, a stack of books, and a place to be alone.) Is there a colorful self-teaching book that goes over the math topic he needs to master next, subtraction and addition with regrouping (or second grade)? I was actually looking at texts used in schools, Harcourt & McGrawHill, because the explanations are always in those, step-by-step, and they're colorful enough for the kiddo to enjoy. Developmental Math would be perfect if only it was in color.

 

I will continue using RightStart with him daily, but I'm inclined to indulge his request for "a math book that explains things to me, like with pictures, so I can do it by myself."

 

Hate to say it, but Abeka. Occasionally, you will have to go over things with him of course. But it really can be done independently.

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You might also think not just about curriculum, but also about level as a way to encourage independent vs joint work.. I have my daughter working independently on math mammoth about a year below her actual level to reinforce arithmetic skills and just generally to feel successful (because she's convinced she's 'bad at math'), and also working with me on LOF which is about a year above what she's capable of on her own (and because she adores the story line and is super motivated). I think of it in the same way as with reading... kids have an 'independent' reading level that is different from an 'instructional' reading level (intended to be a stretch and involves learning new skills).

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We've got the same thing going on here... my 6yo dd much prefers doing her math on her own. We're also using RS, and we were struggling interpersonally with it until I began turning the lessons from the teacher's manual into worksheets for her to do (mostly) on her own.

 

I've also been looking at Developmental Math, which is mentioned in TWTM. I haven't bought it yet, but it's another possibility.

 

:)

Anabel

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My DS also likes independent work. It's sometimes a struggle to figure out how much time to spend teaching a concept. I want to make sure we don't have holes but without spending too much time that he checks out and giving him enough freedom with his studies.

 

Singapore has been a hit with him. I also find activities or fun worksheets that go along with this current area of study. Online games are also a lot of fun for him. Oh, and I almost forgot, he likes the math CD from Singapore.

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So you are ok with continuing with RS but giving him more independent work as well? If so, I would hand him a Kumon book--cheap, pretty, easy to understand, great reinforcement.

 

This is the option I looked at first, but without walking into temptation (Barnes & Noble) I can't tell if Kumon includes explanations or just problems to do. Does it? Bear specifically asked for explanations. I think he'd even be happy with a book that is all this-is-how-math-works and no practice.

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He'd probably like Mammoth Math because it does have the explanations and teaching written into the lesson and generally include pictures and good examples. You can also just buy the topics that he needs.

:iagree:

 

Math Mammoth could be done independently. I use a B&W printer, so I couldn't tell you how much color it has, but I know it does have some.

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He'd probably like Mammoth Math because it does have the explanations and teaching written into the lesson and generally include pictures and good examples. You can also just buy the topics that he needs.

 

:iagree:

DD7 loves Math Mammoth and does much of it on her own. It's written to the student, the explanations are (IMHO) exceptionally clear and well presented, and the pages have enough color and illustrations to keep them interesting, without being distracting. I love the fact that the "text" and the "workbook" are fully integrated into a single "worktext."

 

Generally the concepts are divided into small sections of 4-5 pages each, with the topic being clearly introduced and explained, accompanied by several problems fully worked out step by step. Then there is usually a section where the problems are partially worked out and the student completes them, followed by a section the student works on their own. There are plenty of word problems and the sections often include a challenging "Puzzle Corner" problem at the end.

 

You can buy the individual Blue Series topic books (e.g. Addition 1A, Subtraction 2B, Money, etc) or a whole year's complete curriculum (Light Blue Series).

 

Jackie

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