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Content difference between curricula targeting gifted children


MissKNG
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Different curricula targets gifted children (Moving Beyond the Page, MCT, William and Mary Gifted Education, etc)...

 

My question is: what is the content difference between these curricula verses a "regular" curriculum (meaning not specifically targeting gifted children)? What is the difference between 1st grade W&M or MCT materials verses other "regular" 1st grade curriculum? Or 2nd or 3rd grade....

 

I hope you understand what I'm asking!!:tongue_smilie:

 

Thanks!

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I don't know if there's content difference so much as format difference. Programs targeted to gifted children are less repetitive. Maybe the gifted programs have more content, because of the lack of repetition.

 

I mostly use regular stuff ahead of grade level and skip around, but the one gifted K book I have has 1) very little repetition, 2) assumes the student knows a lot more already, like the K workbook assumes they already know their letters and sounds and numbers and how to write words, 3) branches off into further applications, like writing their own stories instead of just copying a few words in most grade-level books.

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The only resources I've used that are specifically designed with gifted children in mind are the MCT materials. However, these characteristics would be helpful for gifted elementary students:

 

Has a format that is young child friendly, such as larger type, wider line spacing, more illustrations, color illustrations, and workbooks, but the materials are 1-3 years ahead of grade.

 

Has the standard opportunity for practice drastically reduced and perhaps offers supplemental practice opportunities in the form of extra worksheets (so you don't end up with a partially filled in workbook, which makes me completely *nuts*).

 

Does not talk down to children.

 

Has exercises that require real thought, not just regurgitation.

 

Interestingly, Singapore materials (math and science) seem to do this to a great extent.

Edited by EKS
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Oh yeah--it's all at her *physical* level so she can do it all. That's one thing with the higher-grade curricula--she can't do everything developmentally that a 1st grader could. But she needs the mental challenge. So the gifted programs take the asynchronism into account. Dd LOVES her one gifted book more than any of her others. It fits perfectly into her physical limitations but is mentally challenging enough to push her.

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Another key difference to remember, is that part of what makes a kid "gifted" is not that they are necessarily "smarter" (as many non-technically gifted kids can work very well, above grade level...) but that they think in a very different way. And not all gifted kids think the same way, either.

 

As they tend to think in a different order, than a typical, perfect normal happy bright kid, They can get incredibly frustrated by most curriculum. It is like a learning style, you know... visual, kinesthetic, auditory.... um, gifted type 1, g2, g3 etc. If you knew your kid learned best in a certain way, you would cater to it, and having a GT kid is no different. It is only harder. Sometimes they can be very ahead in understanding, but slow in the skill department (which can get extremely frustrating), also some things they just seem to "know". So you need to move around a lot... there are a lot of challenges. Having a gifted kid is NOT like winning a prize. It is a very difficult situation. I think it takes more consideration in regards to curriculum or content than you would think.

 

So when a program is written specifically for GT kids, I know a few things about it right off the bat.... it will generally have more content, less repetition and more deep thinking. But that doesn't mean anything. I look at MBTP, which is written for GT, and I know that wouldn't have worked for mine. It is written for a specific type of GT kid, which my boys are not. I think any bright young kid who is a good writer/reader (not necessarily a GT thing BTW) can do MBTP just fine. I look at GT curriculum as a starting point.

 

GT is really a hard nut to crack. There is also a HUGE difference between a moderately gifted, highly gifted and profoundly gifted child. Then you have boy vs. girl. THEN you have general learning style... UGH! It can be really exhausting. I wouldn't wish it on anyone! It is not some walk in the park, and when you hear the word gifted, you shouldn't assume that the kids happily are able to do any work put in front of them, a lot of TG kids have other personality issues (many tend to be quite emotionally sensitive, which runs counter to their intellectual ability). It is tricky. Anyway... I am babbling....

 

So, I hope you can glean something from my rambling answer.... :)

 

Synopsis: Just because it says gifted, doesn't mean a "normal" kid can't use it, and some GT kids won't like it. It is just written with a different set of expectations or assumptions.

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Having a gifted kid is NOT like winning a prize. It is a very difficult situation. I think it takes more consideration in regards to curriculum or content than you would think.

 

 

 

 

Thank you for your "rambling" answer!:D I was nodding my head through the whole thing cause it sounds so familar!!

 

One thing I want to point out is: I'm not looking to use gifted curriculum to show that I have a prize child or anything. Except for a few books from Prufrock Press in topics that interest dd, I don't plan on using "gifted" curriculum per say. Still I was just wondering if there was value in buying curriculum targeted for gifted children. We are using MBTP, for example, and I guess (maybe in my HSing newness), I don't see how ANY child couldn't glean from it as well as mine is. I don't see much difference between the regular activities and the "advanced" activities minus more writing. (And I do know they provide age ranges for any child to use it).

 

And I agree it takes more consideration that just content. I've been reading up on learning styles as well. And I definitely agree there are many differences between MG, HG and PG children and am thankful that mine is suspected MG!! I give many props to mommas with HG or PG kiddos!!

 

Sometimes I just feel out of my league with my kiddo and forums are sometimes the only places you can turn!!:tongue_smilie:

Edited by MissKNG
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Another key difference to remember, is that part of what makes a kid "gifted" is not that they are necessarily "smarter" (as many non-technically gifted kids can work very well, above grade level...) but that they think in a very different way. And not all gifted kids think the same way, either.

 

As they tend to think in a different order, than a typical, perfect normal happy bright kid, They can get incredibly frustrated by most curriculum. It is like a learning style, you know... visual, kinesthetic, auditory.... um, gifted type 1, g2, g3 etc. If you knew your kid learned best in a certain way, you would cater to it, and having a GT kid is no different. It is only harder. Sometimes they can be very ahead in understanding, but slow in the skill department (which can get extremely frustrating), also some things they just seem to "know". So you need to move around a lot... there are a lot of challenges. Having a gifted kid is NOT like winning a prize. It is a very difficult situation. I think it takes more consideration in regards to curriculum or content than you would think.

 

So when a program is written specifically for GT kids, I know a few things about it right off the bat.... it will generally have more content, less repetition and more deep thinking. But that doesn't mean anything. I look at MBTP, which is written for GT, and I know that wouldn't have worked for mine. It is written for a specific type of GT kid, which my boys are not. I think any bright young kid who is a good writer/reader (not necessarily a GT thing BTW) can do MBTP just fine. I look at GT curriculum as a starting point.

 

GT is really a hard nut to crack. There is also a HUGE difference between a moderately gifted, highly gifted and profoundly gifted child. Then you have boy vs. girl. THEN you have general learning style... UGH! It can be really exhausting. I wouldn't wish it on anyone! It is not some walk in the park, and when you hear the word gifted, you shouldn't assume that the kids happily are able to do any work put in front of them, a lot of TG kids have other personality issues (many tend to be quite emotionally sensitive, which runs counter to their intellectual ability). It is tricky. Anyway... I am babbling....

 

So, I hope you can glean something from my rambling answer.... :)

 

Synopsis: Just because it says gifted, doesn't mean a "normal" kid can't use it, and some GT kids won't like it. It is just written with a different set of expectations or assumptions.

:lol: You're not babbling. You summed up the problem I'm having completely!!!!

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Thank you for your "rambling" answer!:D I was nodding my head through the whole thing cause it sounds so familar!!

 

One thing I want to point out is: I'm not looking to use gifted curriculum to show that I have a prize child or anything. Except for a few books from Prufrock Press in topics that interest dd, I don't plan on using "gifted" curriculum per say. Still I was just wondering if there was value in buying curriculum targeted for gifted children. We are using MBTP, for example, and I guess (maybe in my HSing newness), I don't see how ANY child couldn't glean from it as well as mine is. I don't see much difference between the regular activities and the "advanced" activities minus more writing. (And I do know they provide age ranges for any child to use it).

 

And I agree it takes more consideration that just content. I've been reading up on learning styles as well. And I definitely agree there are many differences between MG, HG and PG children and am thankful that mine is suspected MG!! I give many props to mommas with HG or PG kiddos!!

 

Sometimes I just feel out of my league with my kiddo and forums are sometimes the only places you can turn!!:tongue_smilie:

Isn't there somewhere that has criteria for the different gifted levels broken down?

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Has a format that is young child friendly, such as larger type, wider line spacing, more illustrations, color illustrations, and workbooks, but the materials are 1-3 years ahead of grade.

 

Has the standard opportunity for practice drastically reduced and perhaps offers supplemental practice opportunities in the form of extra worksheets.

 

Does not talk down to children.

 

Has exercises that require real thought, not just regurgitation.

 

 

Maybe I'm just cynical, but possibly with the exception of the first and may be not even then, I don't see why children of *all* abilities wouldn't benefit from materials with these criterion, similar to how many "special ed" materials add increased learning for all. Flexibility in curriculum to adapt to every child is the goal as many, if not all, children are asynchronous in development and learning.

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I haven't looked at any 'gifted homeschool curriculum', but I know that many gifted programs in schools (ps) have alot more 'creativity' than regular programs. They go deeper into topics, maybe have the child come up with a project/write paper on something they find interesting. Explore topics 'average' classes don't have time for (since they spend more time on making sure all 35 kids in the group understand before moving on). Honestly, I think this is what homeschooling just does naturally. Hs'ers have TIME to dig deeper, explore areas of interests, do more creative projects etc. They get to teach things like Latin (our middle school GT class taught Latin and Greek roots) or another foreign language in elementary school. They have logic problems, present them with challenging vocabulary etc, etc. You get the idea.

As someone else said, this is obviously something ALL children can benefit from!

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Thank you for your "rambling" answer!:D I was nodding my head through the whole thing cause it sounds so familar!!

 

One thing I want to point out is: I'm not looking to use gifted curriculum to show that I have a prize child or anything. Except for a few books from Prufrock Press in topics that interest dd, I don't plan on using "gifted" curriculum per say. Still I was just wondering if there was value in buying curriculum targeted for gifted children. We are using MBTP, for example, and I guess (maybe in my HSing newness), I don't see how ANY child couldn't glean from it as well as mine is. I don't see much difference between the regular activities and the "advanced" activities minus more writing. (And I do know they provide age ranges for any child to use it).

 

And I agree it takes more consideration that just content. I've been reading up on learning styles as well. And I definitely agree there are many differences between MG, HG and PG children and am thankful that mine is suspected MG!! I give many props to mommas with HG or PG kiddos!!

 

Sometimes I just feel out of my league with my kiddo and forums are sometimes the only places you can turn!!:tongue_smilie:

 

I can't figure out how to the the inserting things between posts.... :tongue_smilie:

 

I wasn't referring to you as wanting to use GT as a prize, I was only trying to explain to those few who might read this who think that the term "gifted" is an elitist term, or who regard those for those who need to use it as a label for certain reasons, don't have a walk in the park. I notice a LOT of negativity towards anything/anyone that uses the term "gifted" on this board and IRL. There is a misconception out there about TaG kids, and their parents. ;)

 

Next part: I think that as with any curriculum choice, you need to evaluate it separately. I think that knowing that something is written specifically for "insert group here" helps you to classify it better. I do not only look for gifted curriculum, I look for things that will work best for my children. Gifted curriculum just usually has less busywork.

 

I think that MBTP is not really a gifted curriculum. I think it is an advanced curriculum. I am on the board of a gifted enrichment program in town, and I have the benefit of being around 400 TaG kids on a consistent basis, and get to listen to various speakers that we have come in to speak to our parents. When I went to the Midwest HS convention last year, I went to the MBTP author's discussion, and I didn't really agree with her assessment of TaG-ness. HOWEVER, in HSing circles... I am positive that her program is BETTER than a lot of other alternatives. Again, it is for advanced learners, but not necessarily TaG learners. I do think it can be useful for any parent/child. It would not have worked for my kids, though. I had late writer/readers. It would have had them crying. :D

 

Having a TaGlet is hard. It takes a lot of patience and research. It takes a lot of flexibility. I also happen to believe that many HSers who need to switch curriculums often, might have TaGlets.... as that is just what you HAVE to do sometimes. UGH! I am always on the hunt for something else, I always supplement with other things because I HAVE to.

 

So, IMO gifted curriculum is an indicator of what direction something is leaning, as the authors need to market their product. I think all kids can do gifted curriculum just fine, just like Taglets can do "normal" curr. just fine... it is just a matter of preference.

 

Again, I doubt I addressed the question. ;)

 

Korin

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I never understand placement with G & T materials. Do I go by chronological age/grade level? Do I still have to adjust? I have tried just going by age based grade level and that didn't really work out. I have had the best luck just buying something several grade levels ahead and adapting as necessary.

 

I've found that most "gifted" materials run about 2 years ahead of regular curriculum. So they're really designed for MG kids rather than HG or PG. I guess that makes sense from a sales & marketing standpoint as there are WAY more kids who are MG than HG+. But it does leave me feeling rather disappointed and frustrating that even the GATE materials typically aren't "meaty" enough for my oldest. And she isn't even all that smart compared to a number of the kids we know. If I'm having so much difficulty finding appropriate materials for her, I don't know how the parents of those way-PG kids manage to challenge them.

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"Does not talk down" is extremely important. So is "thinking questions". So is the part about large print. Great post. I would add a few more:

-High input level that offers a quick explaination of the basics in case the child is beginning from scratch or doesn't remember something. For example, when discussing particle accelerators, runs over what the particles are, preferably in a side bar or some other form that is easy to skip if the info is already known.

-Output which is easily adaptable to different levels. For example, Singapore math's problems go from easiest to hardest. Or writing assignments that work if the child is writing extensively or only can manage a paragraph.

-Material that isn't going to devastate the child emotionally. An English program that has the child reading a lot of animal stories where the beloved pet dies are extremely unsuitable, even if the language is beautiful and they are a children's classic that is in other ways entirely suitable. Adult history programs have the same problem.

 

It is very, very tricky to find the right level for a non-academic-minded, moderately gifted, boy, especialy as they get older. You are probably going to have to let them specialize and be bad at some things earlier than you would like. Grrrrrr.....

-Nan

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"Does not talk down" is extremely important. So is "thinking questions". So is the part about large print. Great post. I would add a few more:

-High input level that offers a quick explaination of the basics in case the child is beginning from scratch or doesn't remember something. For example, when discussing particle accelerators, runs over what the particles are, preferably in a side bar or some other form that is easy to skip if the info is already known.

-Output which is easily adaptable to different levels. For example, Singapore math's problems go from easiest to hardest. Or writing assignments that work if the child is writing extensively or only can manage a paragraph.

-Material that isn't going to devastate the child emotionally. An English program that has the child reading a lot of animal stories where the beloved pet dies are extremely unsuitable, even if the language is beautiful and they are a children's classic that is in other ways entirely suitable. Adult history programs have the same problem.

 

It is very, very tricky to find the right level for a non-academic-minded, moderately gifted, boy, especialy as they get older. You are probably going to have to let them specialize and be bad at some things earlier than you would like. Grrrrrr.....

-Nan

This is exactly the problem I'm running into. My DD is only 5, but works consistently between 1.5 and 3 grade levels ahead depending on the subject. She is most advanced in the language arts area, so I can't just buy 2-3 grade levels ahead. I cannot read Sounder to my 5 year old. She would never recover. I was in 3rd grade when I read it and it destroyed me then! This is where I run into a problem and why I'm constantly looking for a "gifted" curriculum that might be more emotionally appropriate as well as academically appropriate. It's a losing fight, I think! :glare:

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I've found that most "gifted" materials run about 2 years ahead of regular curriculum. So they're really designed for MG kids rather than HG or PG. I guess that makes sense from a sales & marketing standpoint as there are WAY more kids who are MG than HG+. But it does leave me feeling rather disappointed and frustrating that even the GATE materials typically aren't "meaty" enough for my oldest. And she isn't even all that smart compared to a number of the kids we know. If I'm having so much difficulty finding appropriate materials for her, I don't know how the parents of those way-PG kids manage to challenge them.

 

What are some examples of "gifted" materials are you talking about that run two years ahead? Moving Beyond the Page doesn't seem to run 2 years ahead of regular curriculum, imo. Then again, that is the only program I have experience with. I usually buy with my dd's cognitive age in mind. Actually that is one reason why I started this thread: how the heck do you find stuff when their minds are so much farther along than their bodies??? :confused:

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I wasn't referring to you as wanting to use GT as a prize, I was only trying to explain to those few who might read this who think that the term "gifted" is an elitist term, or who regard those for those who need to use it as a label for certain reasons, don't have a walk in the park. I notice a LOT of negativity towards anything/anyone that uses the term "gifted" on this board and IRL. There is a misconception out there about TaG kids, and their parents. ;)

 

 

I think that MBTP is not really a gifted curriculum. I think it is an advanced curriculum. I am on the board of a gifted enrichment program in town, and I have the benefit of being around 400 TaG kids on a consistent basis, and get to listen to various speakers that we have come in to speak to our parents. When I went to the Midwest HS convention last year, I went to the MBTP author's discussion, and I didn't really agree with her assessment of TaG-ness. HOWEVER, in HSing circles... I am positive that her program is BETTER than a lot of other alternatives. Again, it is for advanced learners, but not necessarily TaG learners. I do think it can be useful for any parent/child. It would not have worked for my kids, though. I had late writer/readers. It would have had them crying. :D

 

Having a TaGlet is hard. It takes a lot of patience and research. It takes a lot of flexibility. I also happen to believe that many HSers who need to switch curriculums often, might have TaGlets.... as that is just what you HAVE to do sometimes. UGH! I am always on the hunt for something else, I always supplement with other things because I HAVE to.

 

 

I don't know how to insert either so I picked the 3 paragraphs I wanted to address.:)

 

First, I didn't think that's what you meant but I still wanted to make the point that this thread wasn't about that. And I know having a (suspected) TaGlet is hard and takes careful research, which is why I asked this question to begin with. I wanted to know if there was merit in using these types of curriculum and basically what to buy if there was. In the post above, I noted I have trouble deciding on what is appropriate because her cognitive age is higher than her chronological age.

 

I don't think MBTP's age ranges are accurate. A gifted 5 year old is at a 6 year old level? That doesn't sound correct even with a MG child.

 

I'm new to everything and basically don't know how to handle her!:tongue_smilie: I get the "smuck" cause she's young, I get the "smuck" because she is advanced. You know - the parent misconceptions!

 

Anyhoo - I think once I get a better idea of her learning style, things will be much easier. I thought I had an idea but apparently "auditory-spatial" doesn't go together! :001_huh: But I'm glad to have you involved in this thread because you have the experience I need!!

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There is no way I am ever going to read Sounder. I didn't have too much trouble finding reading material. I'm not sure why. TWTM choices seemed to suit us fairly well. I think I probably just automatically avoided the ones I knew would be a problem. Mine spent a lot of time as a beginning reader reading through the Dover folk and fairy tale series. He also did lots of myths. He managed to deal with the tough parts of those without a problem. Mine is only a bit gifted, though, so I didn't have as much of a problem. He read early and was slow to learn to write. In general, I opted to go wider rather than deeper. I added music and foreign languages and puzzles and games and art rather than try to go farther faster or deeper with the basics.

-Nan

Edited by Nan in Mass
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The only resources I've used that are specifically designed with gifted children in mind are the MCT materials. However, these characteristics would be helpful for gifted elementary students:

 

Has a format that is young child friendly, such as larger type, wider line spacing, more illustrations, color illustrations, and workbooks, but the materials are 1-3 years ahead of grade.

 

Has the standard opportunity for practice drastically reduced and perhaps offers supplemental practice opportunities in the form of extra worksheets (so you don't end up with a partially filled in workbook, which makes me completely *nuts*).

 

Does not talk down to children.

 

Has exercises that require real thought, not just regurgitation.

 

Interestingly, Singapore materials (math and science) seem to do this to a great extent.

 

:iagree: about Singapore Math. Plus MEP, Russian Math (from Perpendicular Press), etc. We've never used MCP so I can't comment on that.

 

Another key difference to remember, is that part of what makes a kid "gifted" is not that they are necessarily "smarter" (as many non-technically gifted kids can work very well, above grade level...) but that they think in a very different way. And not all gifted kids think the same way, either.

 

 

 

GT is really a hard nut to crack. There is also a HUGE difference between a moderately gifted, highly gifted and profoundly gifted child. Then you have boy vs. girl. THEN you have general learning style... UGH! It can be really exhausting. I wouldn't wish it on anyone! It is not some walk in the park, and when you hear the word gifted, you shouldn't assume that the kids happily are able to do any work put in front of them, a lot of TG kids have other personality issues (many tend to be quite emotionally sensitive, which runs counter to their intellectual ability). It is tricky. Anyway... I am babbling....

 

 

Synopsis: Just because it says gifted, doesn't mean a "normal" kid can't use it, and some GT kids won't like it. It is just written with a different set of expectations or assumptions.

 

Good points here. I have found my best learning for this on the AL Forum on WTM, although I also have learned from the K-8 one. After a while you learn which parents have dc that do well with the same types of materials yours do and you can glean from them. Of course, having 3 different gifted dc with three different personalities and learning styles can mean that you have to glean from even more people.

 

Also, some dc are gifted because they are deep and long thinkers, so they don't zip through things but go deeper. Some like to zip through things. Some do both which is particularly exhausting to the parent(s) helping them along. Some are reluctant scholars. Some blossom later than others. Just because a dc is gifted, even pg, doesn't mean they work up to their IQ potential.

 

The sensitivity is a HUGE issue around here. All of my dc are highly sensitive, but not all in the same ways or to the same things. For eg, I have one who just couldn't read something with death or violence for years and hated the biolgraphy on Nathaniel Bowditch at age because of it (she can do a bit of it now that she's 14). I have another who once sobbed her heart out in an old Elsie Dinsmore book when Elsie & her dad had a falling out, but who not only had no trouble reading the book on Nathaniel Bowditch, but read an entire book on gladiator fighting with more detail than I'd realized with no problem. My ds is an entirely different kettle of fish with his sensitivity.

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"Does not talk down" is extremely important. So is "thinking questions". So is the part about large print. Great post. I would add a few more:

-High input level that offers a quick explaination of the basics in case the child is beginning from scratch or doesn't remember something. For example, when discussing particle accelerators, runs over what the particles are, preferably in a side bar or some other form that is easy to skip if the info is already known.

-Output which is easily adaptable to different levels. For example, Singapore math's problems go from easiest to hardest. Or writing assignments that work if the child is writing extensively or only can manage a paragraph.

-Material that isn't going to devastate the child emotionally. An English program that has the child reading a lot of animal stories where the beloved pet dies are extremely unsuitable, even if the language is beautiful and they are a children's classic that is in other ways entirely suitable. Adult history programs have the same problem.

 

It is very, very tricky to find the right level for a non-academic-minded, moderately gifted, boy, especialy as they get older. You are probably going to have to let them specialize and be bad at some things earlier than you would like. Grrrrrr.....

-Nan

 

:iagree:

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The best place I go for advice questions and curriculum ideas is the Tagmax web forum. It is extremely hard to navigate, and I haven't been able to get back on it since I changed my email address. Do a web search and you will find it. I used to get the digest sent to my mailbox and only ever read it or went online if there was a specific subject that was interesting. I have to figure out how to get back on there....

 

it is a really good list... there a people all of the world HSing taglets on all levels (pg!! eek!). Lots of advice.

 

Also, who says auditory-spatial can't go together?

 

I have auditory-spatial-visual-kinesthetic-monkey boys in my house. I throw all sorts of stuff at them, and see what sticks. :D

 

And I can't even go near the sensitivity issue... again, that is the problem, they are intellectually/cognitively advanced, but they are still children, and it is hard to be stuck in that sandwich. It is hard to find books that are challenging or rich, yet devoid of troubling issues.

 

must make boys clean up legos....

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The best place I go for advice questions and curriculum ideas is the Tagmax web forum. It is extremely hard to navigate, and I haven't been able to get back on it since I changed my email address. Do a web search and you will find it. I used to get the digest sent to my mailbox and only ever read it or went online if there was a specific subject that was interesting. I have to figure out how to get back on there....

 

 

Also, who says auditory-spatial can't go together?

 

I have auditory-spatial-visual-kinesthetic-monkey boys in my house. I throw all sorts of stuff at them, and see what sticks. :D

 

And I can't even go near the sensitivity issue... again, that is the problem, they are intellectually/cognitively advanced, but they are still children, and it is hard to be stuck in that sandwich. It is hard to find books that are challenging or rich, yet devoid of troubling issues.

 

must make boys clean up legos....

 

I've found Tagmax and it was too confusing for me to look at! I only get bits and pieces of time on the computer so that doesn't help.

 

I've googled "auditory-spatial" and it never comes up! And I can never find anything in books about that particular combo. She is NOT sequential (I am though - ugh). I do know that kids can be different styles though and even if I can't find an auditory-spatial article or book, I can still piece together what I need to do/have with her.

 

Sensitivity!!! I JUST had to deal with a meltdown because SHE wasn't able to hold the baby first - before her daddy! I am still trying to find resources on handling her.

 

 

 

QUOTE FROM KARIN:

""""""Also, some dc are gifted because they are deep and long thinkers, so they don't zip through things but go deeper. Some like to zip through things. Some do both which is particularly exhausting to the parent(s) helping them along. Some are reluctant scholars. Some blossom later than others. Just because a dc is gifted, even pg, doesn't mean they work up to their IQ potential."""""

 

Sorry, I don't know how to quote from different posts....but I have a "zipper". At least right now. Maybe she'll go deeper into things but right now she likes to just learn anything and everything. :tongue_smilie: So I just keep looking for more and more stuff for her to do.

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I've found Tagmax and it was too confusing for me to look at! I only get bits and pieces of time on the computer so that doesn't help.

 

I've googled "auditory-spatial" and it never comes up! And I can never find anything in books about that particular combo. She is NOT sequential (I am though - ugh). I do know that kids can be different styles though and even if I can't find an auditory-spatial article or book, I can still piece together what I need to do/have with her.

 

Sensitivity!!! I JUST had to deal with a meltdown because SHE wasn't able to hold the baby first - before her daddy! I am still trying to find resources on handling her.

 

.

 

What I am trying to say is don't buy into the exclusivity of learning styles. DO research on them separately, if someone didn't do the work for you. I was always frustrated with reading those types of books or articles, as I could have x number of traits for each style equally with both kids. I think that most kids have some traits in each "style" no matter what. It would be great if it were that easy... :tongue_smilie:

 

as far as the meltdown/ freakout/ weird things that are hard to anticipate... :grouphug: it takes a while to figure that out, and it is still difficult if you ever do.

 

My boys seem to take turns.

 

luckily, it seems to be fewer incidences as they get older. At least in my house.

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I've found that most "gifted" materials run about 2 years ahead of regular curriculum. So they're really designed for MG kids rather than HG or PG. I guess that makes sense from a sales & marketing standpoint as there are WAY more kids who are MG than HG+. But it does leave me feeling rather disappointed and frustrating that even the GATE materials typically aren't "meaty" enough for my oldest. And she isn't even all that smart compared to a number of the kids we know. If I'm having so much difficulty finding appropriate materials for her, I don't know how the parents of those way-PG kids manage to challenge them.

 

Quite frankly, the GATE program in California is a joke. All our friends who go to public school are in the GATE program. I just do not believe that we only hang out with gifted and talented kids. It is totally watered down. It's all political. That explains why the GATE materials aren't all that meaty.

 

Susie

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I have three who are gifted. Our oldest is G2 giftedness and our twins are on the first level of giftedness. They are at least a year or two ahead of their age group. I don't use "gifted" materials. I use what I think is the best for our needs and then take out overly repetitive sections and add whatever hands-on or supplementary materials as needed. I find that one program never works so I always combine. For my 11 yr old 7th grader I use Sing and LOF for math for LA for my twins I use Abeka, ILL and WWE because I never find a program that fits right for example.

 

I've found working with their learning styles is my best way to teach and then I just merely move them along as they need. I am very careful about what books they read. I've found that just because they can read something academically it doesn't mean they can emotionally handle it. Sounder was a disaster.:tongue_smilie:

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I have three who are gifted. Our oldest is G2 giftedness and our twins are on the first level of giftedness.

 

I've found working with their learning styles is my best way to teach and then I just merely move them along as they need. .

 

Are you referring to Ruf's levels of giftedness?

 

Learning style is what I'm working on now. I did realize (over the summer) that she doesn't need much repetition.

 

I was just wondering if there was any merit to using "gifted" materials from those who have. Doesn't mean I plan on it - minus some things from Prufrock Press.

 

Thanks for the response!:auto:

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We use some gifted materials, some materials above grade level and a lot of general supplementation. I have two levels of GT in the house among my four oldest; we obviously don't count the baby into the scheme yet. :) It depends on the child. It depends on the subject. It depends on the time, where that child is developmentally overall, and specific to that subject. It also depends on their interest level.

 

Not an answer right...:lol:

 

You certainly can't discount the LOG either, it does make a huge difference in approach. You certainly teach a Level 4 different than a Level 3 and so on down the line. This is the case whether you do it consciously or not. They demand it.

Edited by melmichigan
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You peaked my curiosity. Having looked at samples I am somewhat surprised that Moving Beyond the Page is marketed as gifted material.

 

:iagree:

 

Again, I would say it is really for "advanced learners" which is not the same as "gifted". Oh, advanced learners with good fine motor skills+ likes to write + writes w/o crying.

 

I haven't used it, but I looked at it and sat in on an info session at a convention. Not impressed. But VERY good compared to a lot of other stuff for that age group.

 

It is a decent start, and does fill a gap in the HS curriculum world.

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You peaked my curiosity. Having looked at samples I am somewhat surprised that Moving Beyond the Page is marketed as gifted material.

 

:iagree:Yes!!!!! This is why I started this thread!! LOL!

 

I couldn't see any difference in MBTP so I was wondering about other curricula marketed towards gifted children. In one of the many threads that is currently going on about this topic, I mentioned I didn't see any difference between the regular activities and the "advanced" activities except that they involve more writing.

 

I couldn't imagine using the PreK materials with my dd and she is doing so well with the 5-7 concept (we just made a whooping crane for the wetlands habitat today!). I'm not exactly sure why they claim a gifted 5 year old is equivalent to a "regular" 6 year old. Which is why radiobrain's post about it being for advanced learners makes much more sense.

 

Since MBTP seemed like a "dud", I was wondering if any of the other curriculum fell short as well or really did the job!

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Good details on how gifted kids are different than some other kids. I'm wondering if you have specific books or resources that you like that have helped you understand gifted kids. These could be helpful to us. Thanks!

 

Have you looked at the information at Hoagies' Gifted?

 

The only HS specific book I've read is Lisa Rivero's. It's useful but I wish it had more practical advice on how to adapt general HS curricula for gifted kids.

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Have you looked at the information at Hoagies' Gifted?

 

The only HS specific book I've read is Lisa Rivero's. It's useful but I wish it had more practical advice on how to adapt general HS curricula for gifted kids.

 

 

I have Lisa's book too and I have the same wish. That's why I bought it but it was still helpful.

 

I also found James T Webb's book A Parent's Guide to Gifted Children helpful too.

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Maybe I'm just cynical, but possibly with the exception of the first and may be not even then, I don't see why children of *all* abilities wouldn't benefit from materials with these criterion, similar to how many "special ed" materials add increased learning for all. Flexibility in curriculum to adapt to every child is the goal as many, if not all, children are asynchronous in development and learning.

I've been thinking about this since you posted.... If you just said "flexibility" then absolutely -- all kids can benefit from a flexible approach that fits them, and as you say, many kids are asynchronous in their development. But I wouldn't go so far as to say the particular kind of flexibility that suits a gifted kid would suit all kids (or on the converse that the particular kind of flexibility that suits a kid with LDs would suit all kids). In the case of a gifted kid, the flexibility might lean toward cutting back on the practice that most kids will need, or making things more complicated than strictly necessary (to keep it interesting and provide a challenge). Lots of kids would just find that all very frustrating.

 

I'm hesitant to jump in here at all because we actually don't use any particular materials that are specifically aimed at gifted kids. None of what I've seen has looked like a good fit (even MCT), and we've done well just working ahead of his age (choosing materials based on ability level instead), modifying the schedule, and "tweaking" materials to fit. That kind of flexibility-of-approach isn't peculiar to teaching a gifted kid, but the way it plays out specifically might be.

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Good details on how gifted kids are different than some other kids. I'm wondering if you have specific books or resources that you like that have helped you understand gifted kids. These could be helpful to us. Thanks!

 

For LOG Levels and how they apply to education. Just keep in mind her number are considered a little low, many in her first level gifted aren't considered GT by many programs, and are denied services.

http://www.pagiftededucation.info/documents/RufEstimatesofLevelsofGiftedness.pdf

 

For a list of resources by article and topic

http://www.davidsongifted.org/db/ Their forum is also great for families of GT kids, as is the DYS program.

 

Genius Denied http://www.amazon.com/Genius-Denied-Wasting-Brightest-Young/dp/0743254600 is a great book about gifted education that can be applied to many LOG.

 

Stanford EPGY, John Hopkins CTY, and Northwestern CTD are also great resources for classes. Many of them post their materials, or you can find them in their demos. They also post their scope and sequences. From there you can find many of the online classes available through other means at less cost. They have resource libraries on their sites as well. (I will say that I don't think all their classes are complete. i.e. PLATO is a great supplement but not necessarily a full curriculum for the topics mentioned at the middle school level, personal opinion only.)

Edited by melmichigan
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:iagree:

 

Again, I would say it is really for "advanced learners" which is not the same as "gifted". Oh, advanced learners with good fine motor skills+ likes to write + writes w/o crying.

 

 

 

This brings up another issue; finding good materials for gifted dc whose input far exceeds their output. Some have fine motor delays or aren't yet capable of articulating what they think and understand. While you can do the writing for your child, you can't read their minds and do their speaking :)!!! My ds, 9, still usually writes with the penmanship of a 6 or 7 year old and can't spell worth a darn yet, either.

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This brings up another issue; finding good materials for gifted dc whose input far exceeds their output. Some have fine motor delays or aren't yet capable of articulating what they think and understand. While you can do the writing for your child, you can't read their minds and do their speaking :)!!! My ds, 9, still usually writes with the penmanship of a 6 or 7 year old and can't spell worth a darn yet, either.

This is it exactly!!! I know that she would love to write. However, writing is still torturous for her (she's only 5) and she's too much of a perfectionist to phonetically spell words. So I have to spell everything out every time. sigh. Tell me it gets better and this stuff catches up with the rest of them!

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This is it exactly!!! I know that she would love to write. However, writing is still torturous for her (she's only 5) and she's too much of a perfectionist to phonetically spell words. So I have to spell everything out every time. sigh. Tell me it gets better and this stuff catches up with the rest of them!

 

 

It does. I'll try to remember to post when one of mine reaches that stage ;). Okay, my eldest can, but she's 14 and doesn't always choose to do that. She is vehemently opposed to writing unless it's for her own amusment, although she does write out her proofs and short answer questions with much lollygagging. She's not the example you want to hear about, of course, but there are some with highly motivated dc.

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It does. I'll try to remember to post when one of mine reaches that stage ;). Okay, my eldest can, but she's 14 and doesn't always choose to do that. She is vehemently opposed to writing unless it's for her own amusment, although she does write out her proofs and short answer questions with much lollygagging. She's not the example you want to hear about, of course, but there are some with highly motivated dc.

No, you're right! :lol: Sadly, she sounds much like me at that age!!!

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