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Martin Luther was intensely anti-semitic, and had no problem suggesting Jews be put to death. Since he was the founder of Protestantism, in a sense that entire branch is "tainted", although I am sure there are individual denominations more current that aren't specifically anti-semitic.

 

Catholicism certainly has a hardcore history of brutality against the Jews. Pope John Paul II tried to reach out and amend that, but you are asking about history, not just current.

Michelle T

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I don't know. I've never met an anti-semitic Christian. Whatever the past was, it is a rare thing nowadays.

 

She grew up in Germany before WWII. She was raised to hate Jews. And she is a devout Christian--very difficult for me to fathom. We had gotten to be very good friends before I found this out about her. She wasn't embarrassed about it and fighting it either--she just kind of figured that it was obvious that everyone should be this way. I find this profoundly, utterly inconsistent with Christianity and with being a good American, too. It's one of two reasons why she and I are no longer friends.

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Maybe Moravian or Assembly of God? They seem pretty alright to me.

Geez, there are so many denoms, aren't there?

 

Oh--it occurs to me that perhaps we need to define anti-semitism. For me, it doesn't include wanting to witness to Jews about Jesus Christ--but to some, it might.

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because I have been doing some reading and am really shocked and horrified at the persecution that Jews suffered at the hands of both Protestant and Catholic Christians througout history and of the openly encouraged anti-semitism that continued even after WWII. I know people personally who would face persecution every Easter because pastors and priests would incite their congregations telling them that the Jews killed Christ!

 

I cannot understand how Christians can pray to Jesus (a Jew) and follow the Bible (written almost entirely by Jews both OT and NT) and mistreat Jews or have a low opinion of them in any way.

 

The argument that I have heard is that Christians believed that the Jews killed Jesus. Well, that is just absurd. How can you claim that Jesus came to die for ALL of our sins and then be mad when he is crucified? Who was going to give him martyrdom - the Japanese? He was born a Jew, into the Jewish nation, and was preaching to the Jews. If he had to die, wouldn't it have to be among Jews? And does it matter. If he HAD to die and it was because we are ALL sinners how can the Jews be blamed? Jesus must have planned it that way.

 

Sorry but there is still a lot of antisemitism out there among Christians. I have just recently been told by an UBER Christian that the stories of Jewish persecution are highly exagerated and there is more to the story! UGH!!

 

(FYI - I am not Jewish just sick, sick, sick from comments like the one above).

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because I have been doing some reading and am really shocked and horrified at the persecution that Jews suffered at the hands of both Protestant and Catholic Christians througout history and of the openly encouraged anti-semitism that continued even after WWII. I know people personally who would face persecution every Easter because pastors and priests would incite their congregations telling them that the Jews killed Christ!

 

I cannot understand how Christians can pray to Jesus (a Jew) and follow the Bible (written almost entirely by Jews both OT and NT) and mistreat Jews or have a low opinion of them in any way.

 

The argument that I have heard is that Christians believed that the Jews killed Jesus. Well, that is just absurd. How can you claim that Jesus came to die for ALL of our sins and then be mad when he is crucified? Who was going to give him martyrdom - the Japanese? He was born a Jew, into the Jewish nation, and was preaching to the Jews. If he had to die, wouldn't it have to be among Jews? And does it matter. If he HAD to die and it was because we are ALL sinners how can the Jews be blamed? Jesus must have planned it that way.

 

Sorry but there is still a lot of antisemitism out there among Christians. I have just recently been told by an UBER Christian that the stories of Jewish persecution are highly exagerated and there is more to the story! UGH!!

 

(FYI - I am not Jewish just sick, sick, sick from comments like the one above).

 

I've been a Christian since high school and have attended a largish church for decades and have never heard anything like that from anyone personally. Of course, I've read about it and it's one of the sins of the church in the past that has rightly been officially repented of. (i.e. it is part of no mainstream Christian church doctrine of which I'm aware. By mainstream, I mean I can't exclude small splinter groups who may call themselves Christian, nor little independent churches with authoritarian pastors and no broader church oversight ) I'm neither surprised that anti-semitism or any other sin exists among Christians, but I think that the tolerance of it exists in pockets, not everywhere. It would absolutely not be tolerated in the church I attend.

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I've been a Christian since high school and have attended a largish church for decades and have never heard anything like that from anyone personally. Of course, I've read about it and it's one of the sins of the church in the past that has rightly been officially repented of. (i.e. it is part of no mainstream Christian church doctrine of which I'm aware. By mainstream, I mean I can't exclude small splinter groups who may call themselves Christian, nor little independent churches with authoritarian pastors and no broader church oversight ) I'm neither surprised that anti-semitism or any other sin exists among Christians, but I think that the tolerance of it exists in pockets, not everywhere. It would absolutely not be tolerated in the church I attend.

 

I haven't seen any of that either (Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian) or now Catholic. Not saying that it doesn't exist, just haven't noticed it personally.

 

How could you be anti-Semitic and Christian, for the very reasons stated?

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Many of the churches I've gone to have been very pro semitic - in that they believe that God still has a plan for the Jewish race and that they are still His chosen people. They also believe that God still blesses or curses people based on how they relate to the Jewish race. My dh was accused of being anti-semitic once although he is not at all. He was guilty of making a mild joke about a Jewish man in the Bible being described as having a red nose. So anti-semitism can be in the eye of the beholder.

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because I have been doing some reading and am really shocked and horrified at the persecution that Jews suffered at the hands of both Protestant and Catholic Christians througout history and of the openly encouraged anti-semitism that continued even after WWII. I know people personally who would face persecution every Easter because pastors and priests would incite their congregations telling them that the Jews killed Christ!

 

I cannot understand how Christians can pray to Jesus (a Jew) and follow the Bible (written almost entirely by Jews both OT and NT) and mistreat Jews or have a low opinion of them in any way.

 

The argument that I have heard is that Christians believed that the Jews killed Jesus. Well, that is just absurd. How can you claim that Jesus came to die for ALL of our sins and then be mad when he is crucified? Who was going to give him martyrdom - the Japanese? He was born a Jew, into the Jewish nation, and was preaching to the Jews. If he had to die, wouldn't it have to be among Jews? And does it matter. If he HAD to die and it was because we are ALL sinners how can the Jews be blamed? Jesus must have planned it that way.

 

Sorry but there is still a lot of antisemitism out there among Christians. I have just recently been told by an UBER Christian that the stories of Jewish persecution are highly exagerated and there is more to the story! UGH!!

 

(FYI - I am not Jewish just sick, sick, sick from comments like the one above).

 

Well, the book of Matthew does say that the Jews cried out for Christ to be crucified. But then, the book of Acts says that those same Jews heard the gospel preached by Peter and were saved. Here is an excerpt from a blog entry I wrote about this very thing and how the Lord's prayer from the cross ("Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.") was answered:

 

 

Matthew 27:24-25 When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it. Then answered all the people, and said, His blood be on us, and on our children.

 

In these verses the Jews accept responsibility for sending an innocent man to his death. They believe so strongly in his guilt that they call down a curse on themselves and, if that weren’t enough, they add their own children to that curse.

 

In Luke 23:34, Jesus mercifully asks His Father to forgive these Jews knowing they are ignorant of their error.

And when they were come to the place, which is called Calvary, there they crucified him, and the malefactors, one on the right hand, and the other on the left. Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.

 

I have always considered that prayer an example of how we are to forgive our enemies. I have regarded it as an object lesson for us to follow. How God answered the prayer was of no concern to me until very recently.

 

While reading Acts 2:14-41 I made an amazing (to me) discovery! God answered that prayer on the day of Pentecost immediately following Peter’s famous sermon. Peter is addressing the very Jews who had crucified Christ (vs. 22-23 and again in v. 36). He presents the gospel message to the same crowd who only a few short weeks before had urged Pilate to nail Jesus to the cross, who had accepted responsibility for His blood and who had passed that responsibility onto their children as well.

 

Acts 2:21-24 and 36 Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know: Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain: Whom God hath raised up, having loosed the pains of death: because it was not possible that he should be holden of it... (emphasis added)

 

...Therefore let all the house of Israel know assuredly, that God hath made that same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, both Lord and Christ. (emphasis added)

 

In verse 37 the Holy Spirit, recently sent from heaven, is busy convicting souls and drawing them to the Father.

Acts 2:37 Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles, Men and brethren, what shall we do?

 

Verse 38 is the gospel in a nutshell. The true gospel always calls for repentance - renouncing sin and turning from it. It is not enough to just be sorry for sin - one must abandon it and rest in Christ’s righteousness.

 

Acts 2:38 Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.

And here is a most precious verse. Verse 39 proclaims that this promise of salvation is not just for those people standing in the crowd. No, it is also for their children. God is answering His dear Son’s prayer, “Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.†He is absolving the guilty and, just so they know for sure, Peter assures them this forgiveness is also for the children they had so quickly and boldly dragged into their cursed state.

 

Acts 2:39 For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call.

 

Lastly, we have the confirmation of the answer to the prayer - the Jews response:

Acts 2:40-41 And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation. Then they that gladly received his word were baptized: and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls.

Our most merciful Father forgave the very ones who murdered His Son.

 

 

I see this as a confirmation that God did forgive the very Jews who cried out for his crucifixion and I've never been able to understand why or how anyone professing to follow Christ could have anything but love for the Jews. To me, these verses support the idea that Christians, above all people, should have a tender heart towards Jews, just as our Savior did. I've never understood the anti-Semitic mindset in the least.

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She grew up in Germany before WWII. She was raised to hate Jews. And she is a devout Christian--very difficult for me to fathom. We had gotten to be very good friends before I found this out about her. She wasn't embarrassed about it and fighting it either--she just kind of figured that it was obvious that everyone should be this way. I find this profoundly, utterly inconsistent with Christianity and with being a good American, too. It's one of two reasons why she and I are no longer friends.

 

my in-laws are like this. they aren't devout christian but definitely anti-Jews. I think it was the intensive brainwashing they had in Hitler youth.

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The Catholic Church has never been anti-semitic in any regard. Period.

 

I'm offended and disgusted by even the suggestion of it.

 

That is an interesting point of view. I would consider the Inquisition quite anti-semitic, myself. I have the vague idea that you are Orthodox, am I right? Perhaps this is a matter of semantics, then? I imagine most here would mean the Roman Catholic church, when they say Catholic. Are you, instead, meaning the Eastern Orthodox church when you use the word Catholic?

 

Rosie

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This is an orthodox Jewish perspective. I deleted this many times before I decided to just post it. I'm sure many people will be offended by how a traditional Jew views missionary activity against our people, but so be it. This is nothing new, and with the upcoming holiday of Channukah, rather timely.

 

Missionaries that specifically seek to convert Jews to Christianity are, in Jewish terms, the very essence of anti-semitism. Hitler only went after our bodies. Missionaries go after our very souls. A Jew simply cannot become a Christian without denying the entire torah, and a Jew who converts is spiritually cut off from his entire people and from G-d and this can destroy his very neshama (soul). Throughout our history, Jews have been given the choice to convert or die. Most have chosen death.

 

Jews do not proselytize. Judaism is for the Jews. A person can be considered a righteous person and have a share in the world to come without being Jewish. Against all rational odds, the Jewish people have survived while other civilizations have come and gone. It is our torah and our relationship with G-d that perpetuates us. We should just be left to do our thing.

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been tainted with anti-semitism at some point in its history? (I am including all forms of Catholicism and Protestantism in this question)

 

Are you asking because you want to find a religion to convert to, or did you just want to open up the topic? I'm wondering, because I would judge a church more by what they are now than their history.

 

Whatever the beliefs of the past, I think you will find that most people (including me) don't know any anti-Semitic Christians now. In fact, the only people I know who support Israel are conservative Christians (including me.) You may find a stray anti-semite in a Christian church or even a stray church that teaches this, but you could probably find a few Christians (or anybody) who believe anything odd.

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The Catholic Church has never been anti-semitic in any regard. Period.

 

I'm offended and disgusted by even the suggestion of it.

 

Well then perhaps you should read up on Roman Catholic history. Even the Vatican owns up to their horrific treatment of Jews - it was not until 1965, in the Nostra Aetate document, that they even quasi apologized for the whole "the Jews killed Jesus" thing:

 

True, the Jewish authorities and those who followed their lead pressed for the death of Christ;(13) still, what happened in His passion cannot be charged against all the Jews, without distinction, then alive, nor against the Jews of today.

 

Jean Stern, published on the Vatican's website, expounded on the history of poor treatment, espoused as "negative measures" by JPII:

 

John Paul II prefers to recognize that there were even some negative measures taken. In the course, for example, of his visit to the Synagogue in Rome, April 13, 1986, after having recited the passage of Nostra Aetate on the diverse manifestations of anti-Semitism, whoever was the author, he repeated, in fact underlining the last words:«I repeat: "by whoever"». Whoever is the author. Effectively, between the authors of the deplorable acts there figure some Popes and also some Saints. In IV century, Saint Ambrogio impeded the justice of the Jews of Callinicon on the Eufrate, where the Christians had devastated their synagogue. John Paul II has recently recognized, that, on this point, the Saint of Milan was not wise. In the XVI century, Pope Paul IV closed the Jews of Rome in a ghetto. But, a more grave fact: a certain mentality, particularly diffused, tended to see the Jews, as perverted beings, victims of a malediction. Had they not in fact put Jesus Christ to death? It was in this way that the teaching of the catechism of the Council of Trent was forgotten, which attributed the death of Christ to all the sinners, whoever they were. It is unquestionable that this kind of mentality contributed to the passivity of too many spirits in front of the Nazi anti-Semitism.

 

Finally, Benedict, in his speech recognizing the 40th anniversary of the Nostra Aetate, reaffirmed the previous problems:

 

In laying the foundations for a renewed relationship between the Jewish People and the Church, Nostra Aetate stressed the need to overcome past prejudices, misunderstandings, indifference, and the language of contempt and hostility.

 

Refusing to believe something horrible has occurred doesn't make it so. It just lays the groundwork for it to happen again.

 

 

a

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I'd say probably not. There is some strong language against Jews in a couple of the Gospels (likely written at the time of tension between Jewish and early Jewish Christians. I'm not sure if it qualifies as anti-semitic however because the authors still likely saw themselves as Jewish) and if you're a person or religious system willing to exploit that then you can do that with the facade of just following scripture.

 

I'm not sure why that would be surprising to anyone, Christians especially. Churches are institutions run by humans and humans have an enormous capacity for doing bad and hateful and evil things. Show me a church that doesn't have some dark times in it's past and I'll show you an idyllic work of fiction.

 

Note that I say all this as a Christian.

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I don't know. I've never met an anti-semitic Christian. Whatever the past was, it is a rare thing nowadays.

 

 

I can assure you, anti-semitism is alive and well in this country. You would not believe how common it is, actually. There is absolutely no shortage of Christians who hate Jews. You would not believe the stories I hear from other Jews on the Jewish homeschoolers list.

 

Michelle T

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You will not find a perfect church because people are not perfect. You will find racist and predjudiced people in likely every Christian church you want to look at. Do churches condone this? Not any I know of except those connected with extremist groups. But it still happens. I believe it happens because of the lies of Satan and the willingness of us humans to be deceived into that awful way of thinking.

 

Not just Christians are anti-Jew. Muslims who share the same father in Abraham are also known, in a general sense, for being against Jews just as they are against Christians.

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I can assure you, anti-semitism is alive and well in this country. You would not believe how common it is, actually. There is absolutely no shortage of Christians who hate Jews. You would not believe the stories I hear from other Jews on the Jewish homeschoolers list.

 

Michelle T

 

Yes, quite. My husband was walking home from synagogue yesterday and a car sped by, threw a piece of garbage at him and yelled "dirty Jew." I'm just glad I don't live in France or Londond where it is much, much, much worse.

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I think you would be hard-pressed to find any group that wasn't anti-someone at some point in its history. I think it is a natural tendency to dislike and mistrust anyone different from you. During the Middle Ages, most Christians were anti-semitic. Certainly their leaders were. As someone stated earlier, most pro-Israel people in this country now are conservative Christians. Anti-semitism isn't something that is taught by the Bible. The Bible states that Jewish crowds called for the crucifixion of Jesus, but as someone else said, it's very strange to me that anyone would use that to promote anti-semitism. Without Jesus' death on the cross there would have been no resurrection and no forgiveness of sins. (I'm not saying that it hasn't been used to promote violence against Jews. It's just beyond me why anyone would use that reasoning!)

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The Catholic Church has never been anti-semitic in any regard. Period.

 

I'm offended and disgusted by even the suggestion of it.

 

 

This history of the Catholic Church's persecution of Jews is readily available and refusing to acknowledge it is a form of anti-semitism in and of itself. Not unlike people who are Holocaust deniers.

 

Please go learn about this - if you are honest in your pursuit of truth you will be appalled and horrified by the Church's treatment of Jews.

 

And yes, for years and years, priests worked up their congregations into an anti-Jewish frenzy at Easter. And, yes, little Jewish boys and girls were beaten up for being Christ-killers by nice little Catholic children. I would call that anti-semitism too. Certainly on a smaller scale than the Inquisition and the massacres across Europe during the Crusades, but still anti-semitism.

 

As far as the Protestants go, I was ignorant about Luther's vicious and hateful teachings against the Jews. I do not know if this is as widely known as the Catholic persecution of Jews but it is horrifying too.

 

I guess I bring this up for several reasons:

 

a. I have been researching religions and as I have learned about this issue it seems to question the very core of Church -- not Christianity -- but the Church (be it Catholic or Protestant). Anti-semitism is the very Antithesis of Christ. If the Churches were preaching hatred against the very people who gave birth to Scripture and Christ - how had Christ really changed their hearts? How could they be interpreting God's will correctly if they would kill others to force them to follow their religion. As far as I know Christ did not condone killing anyone or even forcing conversion on anyone. Didn't he tell the disciple to spread the good news and if others did not receive it to move on?

 

b. So, can you really call yourself a follower of Christ if you do not honor the Jews (and I do not mean try to convert them). I know lots of you are saying that that is not the case today but isn't the history of your belief system important? If Luther was so full of hate for Jesus' own people and THE actual/physical descendants of Abraham shouldn't his teachings be questioned? If the Popes could promote/allow the killings of Jews for hundreds of years - how can they be so infallible? I am glad they finally fessed up and said it was wrong but does that not lead people to question other things. It is a BIG DEAL to be wrong on this issue.

 

c. I think that a lot of non-Jews, especially in the USA, have been lulled into thinking that anti-semitism is a thing of the past. That is very dangerous! Just because right-wing churches are supporting Israel (I am glad they are) does not mean that there is not anti-semitism.

 

d. THis is in reference to a particular poster: Jokes are a form of prejudice if they propogate a stereotype.

 

e. There's more but I have to go.

 

Finally, I want to encourage ALL Christians to be informed Christians and to really think about this. It is a dark, dark stain on both branches (and all their ramifications) of Christian Churches that Jews were ever persecuted, killed, forced to convert, forced into ghettos, abused, ridiculed, called-names, reduced to stereotypes, etc. and that Christian everywhere DID NOT put a stop to it. (The exceptions are so notable we hold them up all of the time but the truth is there were few who did).

 

If you choose to be a Christian, remember that Jesus was a JEW, know your history and be humbled by the truth. Then go and truly LOVE your neighbor -- including the Jews -- and be willing to defend them the next time anti-semitism rears its ugly head in any way big or small.

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b. So, can you really call yourself a follower of Christ if you do not honor the Jews (and I do not mean try to convert them). I know lots of you are saying that that is not the case today but isn't the history of your belief system important? If Luther was so full of hate for Jesus' own people and THE actual/physical descendants of Abraham shouldn't his teachings be questioned? If the Popes could promote/allow the killings of Jews for hundreds of years - how can they be so infallible? I am glad they finally fessed up and said it was wrong but does that not lead people to question other things. It is a BIG DEAL to be wrong on this issue.

 

Many of us do not belong to denominations with a long history or with tradition as an important part of our belief. Our beliefs are more dependent on what the Bible itself says about things including the Jews.

 

c. I think that a lot of non-Jews, especially in the USA, have been lulled into thinking that anti-semitism is a thing of the past. That is very dangerous! Just because right-wing churches are supporting Israel (I am glad they are) does not mean that there is not anti-semitism.

 

Yes there is a lot of anti-semitism. And it is getting worse in my opinion.

 

d. THis is in reference to a particular poster: Jokes are a form of prejudice if they propogate a stereotype.

 

I was the poster and I guess I did not post clearly. My dh did not make a joke to propogate a stereotype. He translated a story from the Hebrew in the OT that had a play on words about a Jewish man with a red nose. Like the story about Nabal whose name meant "fool" the story itself made the joke. He was accused by a very sensitive person of being anti-semitic.

 

e. There's more but I have to go.

 

Finally, I want to encourage ALL Christians to be informed Christians and to really think about this. It is a dark, dark stain on both branches (and all their ramifications) of Christian Churches that Jews were ever persecuted, killed, forced to convert, forced into ghettos, abused, ridiculed, called-names, reduced to stereotypes, etc. and that Christian everywhere DID NOT put a stop to it. (The exceptions are so notable we hold them up all of the time but the truth is there were few who did).

 

If you choose to be a Christian, remember that Jesus was a JEW, know your history and be humbled by the truth. Then go and truly LOVE your neighbor -- including the Jews -- and be willing to defend them the next time anti-semitism rears its ugly head in any way big or small.

 

I wish you had been upfront that this was not a genuine question but was a way of getting your own message across. There is nothing wrong with your message - I agree with it - but I think that posting in this way stirs the pot.

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Title should say: I was not trying to stir the pot.

 

Like I said, I am researching religions and I truly wondered if there was a Christian group that had no ties to anti-semitism....because if there is I want to know more about them! That was what started my questioning.

 

When people start saying things like.... My religion has never been anti-semitic or "Anti-semitism is a thing of the past" THEN I start sharing what I have already learned.

 

So, again, if anyone know of a religious group which does not have a history of anti-semitism, I would like to know of it. Please share.

Edited by rookie
typo in title
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The Catholic Church has never been anti-semitic in any regard. Period.

 

I'm offended and disgusted by even the suggestion of it.

 

People within the Catholic Church... and Catholics themselves... over the years HAVE sinned against the Jews. Remember Pope John Paul II's apology back in 2000?

 

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/religion/jan-june00/apology_3-13.html

 

(Not that this is the best link to the info, but it was a quick find.)

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I think you would be hard-pressed to find any group that wasn't anti-someone at some point in its history. I think it is a natural tendency to dislike and mistrust anyone different from you. During the Middle Ages, most Christians were anti-semitic. Certainly their leaders were. As someone stated earlier, most pro-Israel people in this country now are conservative Christians.

 

:iagree:

 

All followers of Christ are sinners. So... the fact that Christians, in history, were anti-semitic doesn't exclude them from calling themselves followers of Christ. Of course people who are alive today should be aware of their sins (including being anti-semitic).

 

There is human nature. We all make mistakes. Hopefully we realize we have done wrong and we ask for forgiveness, with the intent of avoiding future sin. God forgives. We don't have to hold onto the guilt and anger of past sins. Remember them yes -- wallow in them no.

 

We are not anti-semitic over here. Dh is Jewish.

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If the Popes could promote/allow the killings of Jews for hundreds of years - how can they be so infallible? I am glad they finally fessed up and said it was wrong but does that not lead people to question other things. It is a BIG DEAL to be wrong on this issue.

 

Popes are only infallible when speaking on matters of doctrine of faith --

ex-cathedra.

 

Here's a link that will give you more information on this.

http://www.catholic.com/library/Papal_Infallibility.asp

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I can assure you, anti-semitism is alive and well in this country. You would not believe how common it is, actually.

 

Now this surprises me. Perhaps it depends upon WHERE a person lives??? My entire life I did not encounter *any* negative comments about Jewish people that I can remember (until I visited Russia several years ago with my Jewish dh and I was SO shocked at some responses I overheard). Now, granted, I am not Jewish... so I just asked dh. He's been here in the US for just over 20 years and says he cannot remember ONE instance where he was discriminated against or insulted for being Jewish. Not one. (Of course he and his family have stories about the anti-semitism in Russia that would curl your hair.)

 

Dh and I have lived in NYC and in other suburban areas in the northeast.

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I was brought up as a Lutheran, then went to and Assembly of God church, Baptist Church, Episcopal Church and United Church of Christ. I also attended Catholic school (Roman Catholic), and I never heard anything bad about Jews. Then, I married a Jew, and heard all kinds of stories from his family about how they have been called all kinds of strange and cruel names by people claiming to be Christians. It blows my mind that people can be so ignorant and intolerant. The thing that really bothers me, though, is that these same Jews (in dh's family), who are bothered by these blanket statements about them, make horrible, inaccurate statements about Muslims. I try to point out that they are making the same judgements about the Muslims that they are receiving from Muslims and Christians alike, but that doens't go over too well.

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Anti-semitism is the very Antithesis of Christ. If the Churches were preaching hatred against the very people who gave birth to Scripture and Christ - how had Christ really changed their hearts? How could they be interpreting God's will correctly if they would kill others to force them to follow their religion. As far as I know Christ did not condone killing anyone or even forcing conversion on anyone. Didn't he tell the disciple to spread the good news and if others did not receive it to move on?

 

b. So, can you really call yourself a follower of Christ if you do not honor the Jews (and I do not mean try to convert them).

------

 

Finally, I want to encourage ALL Christians to be informed Christians and to really think about this.

-----

If you choose to be a Christian, remember that Jesus was a JEW, know your history and be humbled by the truth. Then go and truly LOVE your neighbor -- including the Jews -- and be willing to defend them the next time anti-semitism rears its ugly head in any way big or small.

 

:001_huh:

 

This is where I think we get into a fundamental misunderstanding of what it means to be a Christian.

 

Being a Christian does not mean that you are promising to be Perfect, or that you will never sin, or that you will never misunderstand scripture. It means you have realized what a poor, miserable wretch you really are and that standing before God on your own will leave you a crispy critter.

 

This is just like the statements of "How can you REALLY call yourself a Christian and still believe.....

 

that abortion is right

that it's ok to kill someone even in self defense

that denominations are ok

that..........

 

HATE is the Antithesis of Christ. period.

antisemitism would be merely ANOTHER form of hate among a host of problems. What is it about antisemitism that you think makes it worse than other forms of hate?

 

there are a number of different issues, and they all revolve around selfishness.

 

As Cricket so aptly pointed out, people have hated each other since the beginning of time. Even the Jews have a history of hate and selfishness. So do atheists ;)

 

And as alpidarkomama shows us, someone will always consider someone else's efforts a matter of hate, regardless the mindset and heart of the other person. Can't win either way.

 

I do know that many groups that realize the Jews were ultimately responsible for Jesus' death are NOT "anti-semitic" -- it's merely a statement of fact. Kinda like people freaking out and calling Christians "homophobic" simply because we acknowledge that scripture speaks against homosexuality. Statements of fact do NOT equate with hate.

 

But for the OP, no, I can't think of a group of people period that hasn't been tainted with some form of hate. Including Christians.

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I always get a little perturbed when people try to use scripture to justify an attitude against the Jews. If you read Romans 11 it's pretty clear that we owe a lot to the Jews.

 

25I do not want you to be ignorant of this mystery, brothers, so that you may not be conceited: Israel has experienced a hardening in part until the full number of the Gentiles has come in. 26And so all Israel will be saved, as it is written:

"The deliverer will come from Zion;

he will turn godlessness away from Jacob.

27And this is[f] my covenant with them

when I take away their sins."[g]

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I do know that many groups that realize the Jews were ultimately responsible for Jesus' death are NOT "anti-semitic" -- it's merely a statement of fact. Kinda like people freaking out and calling Christians "homophobic" simply because we acknowledge that scripture speaks against homosexuality. Statements of fact do NOT equate with hate.

 

True this.

 

To the OP, Jehovah's Witnesses have no history of anti-semitic. We do believe the above statement of Peeks that the Jewish religious leaders of the time were responsible for the death of Jesus, but we also believe that an entire group of people cannot be condemned for the actions of a few from 2000 years ago. That would be prejudice...;) Which we aren't.

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This is an orthodox Jewish perspective.

Missionaries that specifically seek to convert Jews to Christianity are, in Jewish terms, the very essence of anti-semitism. Hitler only went after our bodies. Missionaries go after our very souls. A Jew simply cannot become a Christian without denying the entire torah, and a Jew who converts is spiritually cut off from his entire people and from G-d and this can destroy his very neshama (soul). Throughout our history, Jews have been given the choice to convert or die. Most have chosen death.

 

Jews do not proselytize. Judaism is for the Jews. A person can be considered a righteous person and have a share in the world to come without being Jewish. Against all rational odds, the Jewish people have survived while other civilizations have come and gone. It is our torah and our relationship with G-d that perpetuates us. We should just be left to do our thing.

 

This is interesting. JWs believe it is our commission to preach the Good News of the Kingdom. Our intent is not to convert for sheer numbers or members....but as Math 28:19 and 20 says to make disciples of people of all the nations.

 

When someone attempts to persuade me my beliefs are wrong I don't assume they are anti-Scarlett....I just listen and decide if their points are valid or not...if not I say, 'thanks, but no thanks.' I don't consider their motives to be hate of my very being.

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been tainted with anti-semitism at some point in its history? (I am including all forms of Catholicism and Protestantism in this question)

 

This is not an honest question for debate. Your question should be based on people or individuals and can't be answered based on a denomination. You already show bias toward Christianity with the wording and will not find any answer that appeals or makes you content.

 

No Christian should profess being anti-Jew or anti-Israel. If one does.. it is NOT in his FAITH to do so... but in his SIN. Very different things.

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This is not an honest question for debate. Your question should be based on people or individuals and can't be answered based on a denomination. You already show bias toward Christianity with the wording and will not find any answer that appeals or makes you content.

 

No Christian should profess being anti-Jew or anti-Israel. If one does.. it is NOT in his FAITH to do so... but in his SIN. Very different things.

 

Thank you. That is what I was trying to say.

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This is not an honest question for debate. Your question should be based on people or individuals and can't be answered based on a denomination. You already show bias toward Christianity with the wording and will not find any answer that appeals or makes you content.

 

No Christian should profess being anti-Jew or anti-Israel. If one does.. it is NOT in his FAITH to do so... but in his SIN. Very different things.

 

Very true. I was coming to post that I don't think there's any anti-Semitic LDS activity (that I know of), but I wouldn't be surprised if there were a few individuals that were anti-Semitic, against the teachings of God--because people have their free agency and can individually believe what they want, even if the denomination believes very strongly against it. I don't think any denomination is openly anti-Semitic :confused: as that would entirely un-Christ-like and go against almost the entire OT, wouldn't it?

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This is an orthodox Jewish perspective. I deleted this many times before I decided to just post it. I'm sure many people will be offended by how a traditional Jew views missionary activity against our people, but so be it. This is nothing new, and with the upcoming holiday of Channukah, rather timely.

 

Missionaries that specifically seek to convert Jews to Christianity are, in Jewish terms, the very essence of anti-semitism. Hitler only went after our bodies. Missionaries go after our very souls. A Jew simply cannot become a Christian without denying the entire torah, and a Jew who converts is spiritually cut off from his entire people and from G-d and this can destroy his very neshama (soul). Throughout our history, Jews have been given the choice to convert or die. Most have chosen death.

 

Jews do not proselytize. Judaism is for the Jews. A person can be considered a righteous person and have a share in the world to come without being Jewish. Against all rational odds, the Jewish people have survived while other civilizations have come and gone. It is our torah and our relationship with G-d that perpetuates us. We should just be left to do our thing.

 

Are you talking religiously or politically?

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I do know that many groups that realize the Jews were ultimately responsible for Jesus' death are NOT "anti-semitic" -- it's merely a statement of fact.

 

Peek,

 

I agree with your point here, but I have to disagree with the statement. The Jews called for the death of Jesus, but they didn't have the legal authority to put him to death themselves, so they can't be "ultimately responsible." The Roman government condemned and executed Jesus, albeit because of pressure from the Jews. If Pilate had had a backbone and said no, Jesus would not have been executed. Of course, I believe it was all part of God's plan. But I don't believe the Romans/gentiles were any less guilty of Jesus' death than the Jews. Pilate washing his hands of the matter did not absolve him of his guilt in the matter.

 

Elizabeth

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Peek,

 

I agree with your point here, but I have to disagree with the statement. The Jews called for the death of Jesus, but they didn't have the legal authority to put him to death themselves, so they can't be "ultimately responsible." The Roman government condemned and executed Jesus, albeit because of pressure from the Jews. If Pilate had had a backbone and said no, Jesus would not have been executed. Of course, I believe it was all part of God's plan. But I don't believe the Romans/gentiles were any less guilty of Jesus' death than the Jews. Pilate washing his hands of the matter did not absolve him of his guilt in the matter.

 

Elizabeth

 

Romans/gentiles were not guilty. If their leader had Jesus executed what did it have to do with them? The leader is guilty.

 

I'm sure there were tons and tons of Jews not there at that given time yelling for Jesus to be killed. They are not guilty. Jewish followers of Jesus were not guilty, obviously, since they didn't want him to die. The only Jews who were guilty are the ones who pushed for Jesus to die. Any Jews who were not there, did not participate, or were alive before or after that time were not guilty. You can't define a group by their minority, and certainly of all the Jews it was a small minority.

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Romans/gentiles were not guilty. If their leader had Jesus executed what did it have to do with them? The leader is guilty.

 

I'm sure there were tons and tons of Jews not there at that given time yelling for Jesus to be killed. They are not guilty. Jewish followers of Jesus were not guilty, obviously, since they didn't want him to die. The only Jews who were guilty are the ones who pushed for Jesus to die. Any Jews who were not there, did not participate, or were alive before or after that time were not guilty. You can't define a group by their minority, and certainly of all the Jews it was a small minority.

 

None of them were guilty and they all were. Each and every one of us who commits sin (that would be everyone according to Romans 3:23) are guilty. It was our sin that necessitated Christ's death to begin with. No man took Christ's life. He laid it down (I John 3:16).

 

Agreeing with a previous poster who said,

 

No Christian should profess being anti-Jew or anti-Israel. If one does.. it is NOT in his FAITH to do so... but in his SIN. Very different things.

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Peek,

 

I agree with your point here, but I have to disagree with the statement. The Jews called for the death of Jesus, but they didn't have the legal authority to put him to death themselves, so they can't be "ultimately responsible." The Roman government condemned and executed Jesus, albeit because of pressure from the Jews. If Pilate had had a backbone and said no, Jesus would not have been executed. Of course, I believe it was all part of God's plan. But I don't believe the Romans/gentiles were any less guilty of Jesus' death than the Jews. Pilate washing his hands of the matter did not absolve him of his guilt in the matter.

 

Elizabeth

 

This is true in a way. But the Jews did say, "Let his blood be on us and on our children." They took responsibility after Pilate said he washed his hands of the matter. But, it is also true that no one took Jesus' life - he laid it down of His own free will. It is also true that we all created the situation that required Jesus to lay His life down for us through our own sin. It was God's plan for our redemption. Also, in Acts 2, Peter preaches to those same Jews and they were pricked in their hearts and were forgiven and saved - an answer to Jesus' prayer on the cross, "Forgive them for they know not what they do."

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True this.

 

To the OP, Jehovah's Witnesses have no history of anti-semitic. We do believe the above statement of Peeks that the Jewish religious leaders of the time were responsible for the death of Jesus, but we also believe that an entire group of people cannot be condemned for the actions of a few from 2000 years ago. That would be prejudice...;) Which we aren't.

 

I would argue that the Jews were not responsible for the death of Jesus. The responsibility lies in the SIN of all people. Those particular people may have called for his death, the Romans may have carried it out, but it was destined since the beginning of time.

 

It could have been Celtics and the Aztecs and it wouldn't have changed a thing.

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Romans/gentiles were not guilty. If their leader had Jesus executed what did it have to do with them? The leader is guilty.

 

I'm sure there were tons and tons of Jews not there at that given time yelling for Jesus to be killed. They are not guilty. Jewish followers of Jesus were not guilty, obviously, since they didn't want him to die. The only Jews who were guilty are the ones who pushed for Jesus to die. Any Jews who were not there, did not participate, or were alive before or after that time were not guilty. You can't define a group by their minority, and certainly of all the Jews it was a small minority.

 

I agree with you... but I also agree with those who said we are all guilty.

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