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Sometimes I win, sometimes the Asperger's wins.


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:grouphug:

 

Ds10 had a huge, honking meltdown at the airport while we were waiting to pick up my inlaws. He was screaming, flopping, jumping, flapping...all the while I'm hoping that no one calls security on me. What a fiasco!

 

I definitely need a Mike's!

 

:cheers2:

 

Oh well, tomorrow is another day, and very unlikely to be as bad!

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Thank you all!

 

(((Mamasheep))))

I could use a hug today too.

 

:grouphug:Merry:grouphug: Thank you.

 

:grouphug:

 

Ds10 had a huge, honking meltdown at the airport while we were waiting to pick up my inlaws. He was screaming, flopping, jumping, flapping...all the while I'm hoping that no one calls security on me. What a fiasco!

 

I definitely need a Mike's!

 

:cheers2:

 

Oh well, tomorrow is another day, and very unlikely to be as bad!

 

We had one of those in an airport once. I felt like I needed a sign that said something like, "Our son's behavior is a result of autism. Thank you for your patience." Or perhaps, "He has autism, what's your excuse?" for all those people who stared rudely. I was a little afraid someone would think we were not his parents and were trying to kidnap him or something. Ugh. You have my sympathies.

 

 

UGH

My day was the worst. My 9 yr old aspie stuck the stylus from his DS into my 7 yr olds ear. BLOOD everywhere!

We spent the day at the ENT's. Luckily my 7 yr old will be fine.

 

WOW! Gosh! Um...I think you win.

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Wow, I win?! Gee thanks!

I told my hubby I was going to bed and trying again tomorrow. Today was just a disaster, one thing after another went wrong.

 

I may take tomorrow off of school.... and we are already "behind". *sigh* I'd love nothing more than to sleep in late and stay in my jammies all day.

 

Too bad youngest ds has to be at pre-k at 8. ICK

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:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

 

An article posted on the Yahoo group for those who homeschool aspies states that moms of aspies have similar stress levels to soldiers in combat.

 

Even the soldiers get to come home after 15 months max! We are in the stressful situation for about 2 decades!

 

(Not that I'm diminishing the soldier's sacrifice. DH proudly serves in the military.)

 

But, I wouldn't trade this journey for the world, of course!

 

:)

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:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

 

An article posted on the Yahoo group for those who homeschool aspies states that moms of aspies have similar stress levels to soldiers in combat.

 

Even the soldiers get to come home after 15 months max! We are in the stressful situation for about 2 decades!

 

(Not that I'm diminishing the soldier's sacrifice. DH proudly serves in the military.)

 

But, I wouldn't trade this journey for the world, of course!

 

:)

 

Somehow I find that fairly believable. Do you have a link for the article?

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:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

 

An article posted on the Yahoo group for those who homeschool aspies states that moms of aspies have similar stress levels to soldiers in combat.

 

 

Do you have a linky for that article pretty please?

 

 

My frustration of the day: my 6yo son just can't seem to see the difference between d and b when he reads. He gets to an unfamiliar word, starts going "d or b? d or b? D or B??!" and flapping around and generally having a mini-meltdown. Then about 2 minutes later I go to help him with a word that I think he might get stuck on and he says "Oh Mummy, I know that word! We learned it in book 1 of the mauve set." (Which we did. Once. Ages ago.) How can he have a photographic memory one minute and the inability to recognize a letter another?

 

Funny moment of the day: dh and I spent some time netting a tall fruit tree to keep the parrots off it, only to find that there is a hole in the netting. Dh pointed this out and I jokingly said, "Oh, we'll just put a sign on there telling the birds they can't fly in" (lame joke, I know). Ds didn't appear to hear my comment, until fully five minutes later, he said "But Mummy, that won't work, because the birds can't read" lol

Edited by Hotdrink
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Do you have a linky for that article pretty please?

 

 

My frustration of the day: my 6yo son just can't seem to see the difference between d and b when he reads. He gets to an unfamiliar word, starts going "d or b? d or b? D or B??!" and flapping around and generally having a mini-meltdown. Then about 2 minutes later I go to help him with a word that I think he might get stuck on and he says "Oh Mummy, I know that word! We learned it in book 1 of the mauve set." (Which we did. Once. Ages ago.) How can he have a photographic memory one minute and the inability to recognize a letter another?

 

Funny moment of the day: dh and I spent some time netting a tall fruit tree to keep the parrots off it, only to find that there is a hole in the netting. Dh pointed this out and I jokingly said, "Oh, we'll just put a sign on there telling the birds they can't fly in" (lame joke, I know). Ds didn't appear to hear my comment, until fully five minutes later, he said "But Mummy, that won't work, because the birds can't read" lol

 

I think most homeschool moms have stress levels at the level of a combat soldier. I feel like I ave been in the line of fire for 14 years...LOL!!

 

Oh, and all of my kids mix up b and d and p and q until about 7...and they write their numbers backwards FOREVER...even though I make them fix them EVERY time! You would think they would learn....:tongue_smilie:

 

~~Faithe

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We had one of those in an airport once. I felt like I needed a sign that said something like, "Our son's behavior is a result of autism. Thank you for your patience." Or perhaps, "He has autism, what's your excuse?" for all those people who stared rudely. I was a little afraid someone would think we were not his parents and were trying to kidnap him or something. Ugh. You have my sympathies.

 

 

I saw a mama at the zoo the other day with her son. She wore a T-shirt that said, iirc, "Does my child's behavior disturb you? Ask me about autism." A quick google search found quite a few similar shirts from various sources. I thought it was cool because it very quickly provided all the explanation a reasonable person might need for a child's (in this case, teen's) behavior.

 

To the OP (and the PP with the emergency room incident today): :grouphug:

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:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

(Group hug)

 

 

gosh I wish we could all meet for lunch or something. DD is a teen now and although the meltdowns are fewer these days they come out of nowhere and knock me around pretty good.

 

Today, the Asperger's won. And that is all I have to say about that.

 

 

Except I could really use a hug.

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:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

(Group hug)

 

 

gosh I wish we could all meet for lunch or something. DD is a teen now and although the meltdowns are fewer these days they come out of nowhere and knock me around pretty good.

 

I think this is what got to me this time. He's not a teen yet (not until April...gah!) but is definitely on the brink. We don't have the all-day (if not all week) meltdowns anymore at all. Most of the time he is cheerful, cooperative, helpful, and a pleasure to have around. He has a good sense of humor and is learning to make conversation at least some of the time, though he does still tend to lecture ad nauseum about his current special interest (Sims 2--he doesn't even OWN the thing, although he's getting it for Christmas, but can lecture for hours on the characteristics of each sim type because he's been reading up on it). He's gotten really good at monitoring his own emotional state and taking action as needed to head off the big explosions, so most of the time if he feels himself starting up that road he'll just say he needs a break and excuse himself to his room until he's back in control. Occasionally there are fits of hollering and storming from the room, but he IS a 12 year old boy, after all, and some of that is to be expected, autism or no. So I think part of my problem the other day when I first posted was that this was an all-out melt-down like nothing we have seen in a long time, right in the middle of the park. Yelling, flailing, and me trying to restrain him so he wouldn't run away--and failing because he's so big now, so I had to let my 7 year old walk home by herself, frightened by what was happening (it's just across the street, and dad was home), while I chased him down (not too hard because the child can NOT run), calmed him down, and got him to go home with me. That bit was over fairly quickly, but the mood dragged on through the whole day, flaring up every few minutes and requiring cooling down time in his room, and kept us from getting anything constructive done. On the whole it was not a really over-the-top kind of day--we've definitely gone through MUCH worse with him when he was younger--it was just so out of the blue, and it's part of a regressive pattern I've been noticing a lot lately, which makes me feel like all that really cool progress we've made is being slowly, but surely unravelled and there's nothing I can do to stop it. I think it's probably just puberty landing squarely on our heads and I can probably hold out hope for him becoming a very responsible, pleasant young man once the hormones have taken their toll. But I was feeling discouraged that day because it had been so long since I had to chase him around the neighborhood.

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:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

 

An article posted on the Yahoo group for those who homeschool aspies states that moms of aspies have similar stress levels to soldiers in combat.

 

Even the soldiers get to come home after 15 months max! We are in the stressful situation for about 2 decades!

 

(Not that I'm diminishing the soldier's sacrifice. DH proudly serves in the military.)

 

But, I wouldn't trade this journey for the world, of course!

 

:)

 

Oh Man, I hate to be the voice of doom but the stress most definitely doesn't end when they move out. I'm finding my daughter's need for support is stronger than ever and I don't see that ending in the foreseeable future. If anything, the worries increase as the stakes grow.

 

Having a rough semester myself.

 

:grouphug:

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Oh Man, I hate to be the voice of doom but the stress most definitely doesn't end when they move out. I'm finding my daughter's need for support is stronger than ever and I don't see that ending in the foreseeable future. If anything, the worries increase as the stakes grow.

 

Having a rough semester myself.

 

:grouphug:

 

I wouldn't call you a voice of doom! Maybe a voice of reason?

 

:)

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