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I stink at music and art. DS does gymnastics for phys ed. He does Chess club. He currently really gets no music (except for children's choir at church) and no formal art instruction (except whatever he makes himself with construction paper, etc). . .Any recommendations. Would you outsource?

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I outsourced for art. I had bought several curricula that looked great, I just was not able to make the time to do it. I found a local artist who agreed to give classes using my curricula (and adding some bits of her own). I'm sure I could have managed if I had put my mind to it, but it really is going well with someone who has a keen interest and knowledge. She comes to our house to give lessons, I don't hover but I do overhear -- she starts out talking about a specific artwork and asks questions I just don't think I would think of.

 

In other cities we've had lessons available at a local center, but here there weren't any so I had to arrange something else.

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I tend to outsource art. The best things we have found are at the art museums, not at the community centers. The museums tend to be cheaper, and more "art" related than "craft" related. I've been burned by some community center art classes that are nothing more than tie-dye junk or noodle necklace projects. :glare: If you can find a good quality class (I have a great museum here that does classes about once a month, my kids love it, and it's worth the 30 min drive) they don't have to go every week. You can expose your dc to great art at home with library books and have them work on projects at a class or camp.

 

For music for a 5yo, if you can afford Kindermusic, it's great. My husband is a musician and has a Music Ed degree, and we still sent our kids to kindermusic. It gives them a great foundation for learning instruments later on and for reading music.

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I stink at music and art. DS does gymnastics for phys ed. He does Chess club. He currently really gets no music (except for children's choir at church) and no formal art instruction (except whatever he makes himself with construction paper, etc). . .Any recommendations. Would you outsource?

 

What do you mean by art/music? Do you want formal instruction or appreciation? I have neglected those areas myself, but am trying to do some appreciation stuff this year. I don't know your son's age, but I got this book.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Stories-Great-Composers-Book-Learning/dp/0739012797

 

We're doing about one composer a month. I try to find library books to use as well. We've even found movies to watch about the composers. I use notebook pages from a set off this site.

 

http://www.notebookingpages.com/

 

My dd just bought a guitar instruction book that included a CD and DVD. It was actually only $10 for the whole set. She's trying to pick up some of that on her own. I plan on teaching some basic piano stuff to my ds next semester. We have a 5 octave keyboard, and I can read music and play a little.

 

I haven't felt the need to do art because the kids were having it at our co-op; however, there will be no art classes for next semester, so I'm looking for ideas on that.

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I've been burned by some community center art classes that are nothing more than tie-dye junk or noodle necklace projects.
This was true of the last classes my boys took at a center in Abu Dhabi. The teacher was nice and all, but they had one or two craft-type projects that lasted them several months.

 

With the tutor we have now, she's talking to them about art appreciation as well -- what do you notice in such-and-such painting and why do you think the artist did that, that kind of thing. They also do drawing and painting, but I feel like the classes are more training to use art as a means of expression (both as the viewer and the creator).

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For music for a 5yo, if you can afford Kindermusic, it's great. My husband is a musician and has a Music Ed degree, and we still sent our kids to kindermusic. It gives them a great foundation for learning instruments later on and for reading music.

 

I second Kindermusik. Their curriculum "Kindermusik for the Young Child" is a two year program, and introduces music reading in a slow way, using the Kodaly method. It also includes some music appreciation.

 

Some people prefer Musikgarten (which was started by the same person as Kindermusik) because it is more keyboard oriented, so that's another option.

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