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What do I do with an 8-year-old who wants to read all day?


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Let him. :lol:

 

Seriously, they are little sponges right now, let him absorb all the information he wants. If you are concerned about 'junk' reading make sure you add lots of good stuff too.

 

Show him the non-fiction books and the fiction books which have a lot of culture, science and math in them. He will learn a lot more than just language arts through reading.

 

If you are worried about math, throw in a few mathy games or 15 minutes of number skills a day.

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Let him. :lol:

 

Seriously, they are little sponges right now, let him absorb all the information he wants. If you are concerned about 'junk' reading make sure you add lots of good stuff too.

 

Show him the non-fiction books and the fiction books which have a lot of culture, science and math in them. He will learn a lot more than just language arts through reading.

 

If you are worried about math, throw in a few mathy games or 15 minutes of number skills a day.

 

:iagree: If it is only comics, or graphic novels etc I would stress getting them school work done, but if he is reading worthwhile novels, or non-fiction leave him be. Or let him know x amount of y subject has to be done by end of the week, and let him fit it in around his reading.

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Maybe you could structure his lessons so that he has to finish certain subjects before he can read for pleasure. I don't think it will dampen his enthusiasm for reading. Hopefully it will help him to be more self-disciplined and self-directed. My oldest child was an avid reader. I used to have to limit his time in the bathroom because I knew he would stay in there reading all day if I let him:001_smile:. After the basics are covered, encourage him to read, read, read.

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My son loves to read all day. I usually let him begin with an hour of reading, then we move on to math, Latin and English. Because he reads so well, and such a wide variety, if that's all we get done on the average day, I am content.

Occasionally we call it a Reading Day. We set aside even the math, Latin and English, and he will read ALL DAY.

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Insist on one math lesson and one grammar lesson a day (plus Latin if you're doing it) and then let him read. Just make sure some of his books are about history and science. :)

 

I agree. Although kids can learn a lot of history and science content through just reading, most don't learn grammar, math and composition through osmosis. An 8 year old should be able to tolerate 30 minutes of math and 20 minutes of grammar daily. I'd add in some copywork and/or dictation, spelling, and a little art and/or a musical instrument. All in, that would total 2 hours of "school time", not that much to ask of an 8 yo, imo.

 

I'd also make sure he's getting enough physical exercise.

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I'd hand him a stack of books and stand back. Seriously. He can cover math by reading Life of Fred and that sort of book, he can certainly read his science, history, geography, literature, art history, music history.

 

I don't mean to imply that he shouldn't do his other subjects, but a kid that reads compulsively is auto-didactic and he can teach himself many subjects in an organic, no-stress way. You might find that if you choose his reading carefully, you can cut down significantly on your "schoolish" content.

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This is my kid. He just turned nine.

 

He actually wakes up before I do, so he reads first thing in the morning and through breakfast (which he prepares for himself). Once I'm up and breakfast is done, we break for formal schoolwork (grammar, writing, math - takes 2 to 3 hours daily). Formal schoolwork is followed by lunch, which is followed by an hour of scheduled Independent Reading. He knows he'll get that time to read after lunch, so he's good about giving me his full attention during formal schooling.

 

Much of our schoolwork choices reflect his desire to read, and the subjects he gravitates towards; we have very little need for formal history or science because he is self-teaching much of those through his reading. We'll do some hands-on work weekly, but for the most part these two subjects are all him. He gets a pile of assigned books to read weekly that follow our chronological history timeline, but I'm not picky about when he reads those (so long as they are done by the end of the week/next library visit).

 

The stop/start method wouldn't work for us (school for 45, "reading recess" for 20). It'd feel more frustrating to stop/start a book throughout the day, then to just wrap up all schoolwork so one could read in a single, longer sitting. My kid would be the one to rush through schoolwork so he could get to read. Or at least that's what I did when I was in school LOL.

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Let him. :lol:

 

Seriously, they are little sponges right now, let him absorb all the information he wants. If you are concerned about 'junk' reading make sure you add lots of good stuff too.

 

Show him the non-fiction books and the fiction books which have a lot of culture, science and math in them. He will learn a lot more than just language arts through reading.

 

If you are worried about math, throw in a few mathy games or 15 minutes of number skills a day.

 

:iagree::iagree:

 

Ever since my dd started to really enjoy reading, we do a lot of non-fiction, and she really retains a lot. Another idea is to do some workbooks like CLE. Both my dc love the CLE science, and it's combining that with their reading, which is great.

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I would try and cover as much as possible with reading. Have you researched Charlotte Mason? She advocates "living books.' There are great science living books. TWTM is also a good source for books lists. There are also great math books are narration stly. I would give him autobiography, biographies, historical fiction. Have you read Genevie Foster's history books..such as The World of Abraham Lincoln? So much of what my son remebers now is from those type of books. I would probably still do some writing and math skills, but you don't need to spend a ton of time on them. You could tie your writing to his reading. IE narrating on what he's read, dictation from his reading.

 

Susan Wise Bauer said something like when she was growing up her mom had them pick one biography, one science, one fiction from the library. Ican't remember the exact type of books, but the idea was 1 or 2 of several differant kinds.

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