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So, I'm making The World Famous Quiver Cinnamon Rolls and I have a question.


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I've never disolved yeast in milk before. When I disolve the yeast in water, it foams a bit. Tonight, when I disolved it in milk, it didn't foam at all. I thought it might be the yeast so I sent poor old hubby out for new yeast. I tried it again and it still didn't foam. I went ahead and made the dough. It didn't rise as much as I thought it would. I was expecting it to rise like bread.

 

It is now in the fridge rising overnight and we'll bake them in the morning.

 

My questions:

1) Does yeast just not foam in milk or do you think something was wrong?

2) Should I expect the dough to rise as much as regular bread?

3) Given what I've mentioned thus far, do you thing we'll have yummy cinnamon rolls tomorrow?

 

:001_huh:

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I use both evaporated milk and water and it does foam, so I do know what you mean. Was your milk warm? I have learned to dissolve all yeast in warm liquid, it will start the fermenting process. I dont think your bread will rise in the fridge, but hopefully, once it gets out into a warm kitchen, all will be well!!!

 

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving too!

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2) Should I expect the dough to rise as much as regular bread?

:001_huh:

 

I've not made that recipe before but you should expect a sweet roll recipe to rise like regular bread. If you used warm milk it should have been fine provided the yeast was good.

 

Yeast is a funny thing--yesterday I made two double batches of my overnight refrigerator dough. I did everything the same to both batches--including proofing the yeast--but one rose beautifully and the other one is just limping along. I did use yeast with different expiration dates, but both were still months away from expiring. Unfortunately I didn't take note of which was which so I don't know which to clear out of the cupboard.

 

I think we'll have the limping along ones for breakfast.

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The milk does have to be warm, and even a fairly exact warm. It has to be warm enough to activate the yeast (that's the foaming), but if it's over a certain temperature (about 120º) it will kill the yeast instead. I warm the milk in the micro but then use a meat thermometer to make sure it's in the right "window", between 110-115º.

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