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My dd cannot tell the difference between 8 and 9!


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My dd6 is in K. She just turned 6 yesterday. In preschool we used thevRid and Staff preschool, and she also did the Kumon numbers books. She Also plays lots of games with us, requiring number recognition. We've been doing K since August and still she cannot remember the difference between 8 and 9. We did pkaydoh letters, and recite the rhymes and I've talked to her about how different they look.

 

It's really frustrating because, mathematically she is doing great- doing addition and subtraction in her head, skip counting, plays dominoes, etc. We use Abeka K.

 

She plays piano and has no problem with the notes. She only reverses b and d in her reading and writing so I don't think there's a learning problem.

 

I , or something, must have confused her somehow!

 

Any more ideas?

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There still can be dyslexia or discalcula present even if the child learns to read without a lot of problems, but you would have more symptoms that continue past 8. Right now I would just work on having her "see" quantities. Do grouping exercises, counting exercises, play number games, ect... Hopefully it will click.

 

If you are looking for a math program as well, I would second RS. It works on the seeing of quantities, using multiple tools (fingers, popsicle sticks, abacus, blocks, ect...).

 

Heather

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She understands the difference in quantity- since she was 2, like most bright kids she could give you either 8 or 9 blocks correctly.

 

It's the visual- if she sees 8 on the page she might say 9 and vice versa. I've taken lots of time to talk about how the 9 either has a straight line or an opening, whereas the 8 is always like 2 closed circles.

 

And this transfers to her writing though much less. If you tell her to write an 8 she will usually write an 8. If you tell her write a 9, she writes a 9.

 

It's just looking at them which seems to be the issue.

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What I did with my youngest was just flash number cards at her. I would do about ten cards once or twice a day. Maybe going through it twice. It could easily be that she actually knows it since she can write them correctly most of the time. Does she consistently say the wrong number?

 

With K, it was more a matter of focus. She was bored and just would give me a number name even if she knew it was wrong.

 

I just had another idea. If she reads the number incorrectly, give her some paper and have her write the number. Then have her compare what she wrote (if it is correct) to what she just read.

 

Believe me. It will come in time unless there is an underlying problem, but from your original post I don't think there is.

 

Linda

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I like the RS Abacus Idea. (Also from the rhyme/song "Yellow is the Sun" taught in RS: "Salty is the sea/8 is 5 and 3/Hear the Thuder Roar/9 is 5 and 4". Might be useful. :))

 

The way 8 & 9 are taught in MUS is to think of vacuum cleaners, and numbers wanting to be 10. (Actually, I think this idea is introduced with addition, not with just learning the numbers.) So, 9 really wants to be a 10, and when given the chance will "suck" a one away from another number with it's vacuum nozzle (the circle part of the 9.) 8 has two circles, so two vacuum nozzles, and sucks two away from any number it's being added to. (Basically it's a cute-sy way to teach regrouping. Maybe just pointing out the one-and-two-circle thing on the numbers would be enough?) The more I type, the more I think this sounds confusing. :tongue_smilie: Just thought I'd throw it out there in case it helps, though. :D

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She understands the difference in quantity- since she was 2, like most bright kids she could give you either 8 or 9 blocks correctly.

 

It's the visual- if she sees 8 on the page she might say 9 and vice versa. I've taken lots of time to talk about how the 9 either has a straight line or an opening, whereas the 8 is always like 2 closed circles.

 

And this transfers to her writing though much less. If you tell her to write an 8 she will usually write an 8. If you tell her write a 9, she writes a 9.

 

It's just looking at them which seems to be the issue.

 

I would have her make them both in Playdoh. The multisensory stimulus should help her remember the difference. She could also make the quantities at the same time so she can see them.

 

Working in sand or salt would be another great multi-sensory method. The reason why I like miltisensory methods is because each sense records things in a different part of the brain. If you have the same material stored in 3 places (touch the playdoh, hearing-have her say the number, visual) she is much more likely to be able to recall it. :D

 

Plus it is jut fun!

 

Heather

 

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I would have her make them both in Playdoh. The multisensory stimulus should help her remember the difference. She could also make the quantities at the same time so she can see them.

 

Working in sand or salt would be another great multi-sensory method. The reason why I like miltisensory methods is because each sense records things in a different part of the brain. If you have the same material stored in 3 places (touch the playdoh, hearing-have her say the number, visual) she is much more likely to be able to recall it. :D

 

Plus it is jut fun!

 

Heather

 

 

 

:iagree:

 

and you could make up a worksheet for her with bunches of numbers (plenty of 8 and 9's in the mix) all over the page. have her circle the 8's in blue, the 9's in pink. Do that a for a week and she may not need more than that. My ds6 did this for bdpq in his VT and it helped.

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I would have her make them both in Playdoh. The multisensory stimulus should help her remember the difference. She could also make the quantities at the same time so she can see them.

 

Working in sand or salt would be another great multi-sensory method. The reason why I like miltisensory methods is because each sense records things in a different part of the brain. If you have the same material stored in 3 places (touch the playdoh, hearing-have her say the number, visual) she is much more likely to be able to recall it. :D

 

Plus it is jut fun!

 

Heather

 

 

:iagree:It also helped DD a lot to trace the numbers in the air. (She was having trouble remembering how to write them, but she could tell me the answer.)
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