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Help me with this kid?


Lizzie in Ma
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Here is a post I never saw myself writing. My 9 year old dd is smart. Yet we are struggling with school. She is driven to just get it over with and I do not understand.

 

Math is the worst. She will go to anything with a pictographic representation first and happily hum while doing it, then she will do the memory work, such as how many cups in a pint, she enjoys those as well. The she will get to the addition and subtraction problems and math facts and loose it completely. She understands how to do them and is able to do them, but she absolutely hates them. Tear every single day and I don't know what to do.l

We use CLE and I think it is great. We drill math facts and she is fairly speedy with them.

What does she need? Is it because her mind understands a "big picture" representation of a problem? And if so, what program is going to work for her?

I would really appreciate input here folks, we can't go on like this.

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If she understands how to do them, don't make her do so many. Just pick a few to do and then perhaps have her do them on a whiteboard instead of on paper. I don't know why but my kids balk less if I let them work on a whiteboard. We have an easel which has one side a blackboard and the other a whiteboard. I think it is the smoothness of the marker and the fact that they get to stand up and can write bigger. Also as she does let her talk it through with you so she's verbalizing as she goes.

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If she understands how to do them, don't make her do so many. Just pick a few to do and then perhaps have her do them on a whiteboard instead of on paper. I don't know why but my kids balk less if I let them work on a whiteboard. We have an easel which has one side a blackboard and the other a whiteboard. I think it is the smoothness of the marker and the fact that they get to stand up and can write bigger. Also as she does let her talk it through with you so she's verbalizing as she goes.

 

:iagree:

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I don't know your daughter, so there could be many reasons why this is happening.

 

I know in my son's case if he said something like this, I would know that he either had a case of the "lazies" or too much busy work at too low of level.

 

I had actually spent a long time writing a description of her to help with this but it took me so long that when I posted it I had been logged out and lost the whole thing.

I ended up posting because I have eliminated the possibility that is is a character issue after spending weeks working with her and observing her. She is an industrious kid by nature, always busy mostly cheerful about chores and school.

Her hands are always busy and I am wondering if there is a way to do the larger problems in some way, "hands on". Or if the way she visualizes the problems is more pictorially. When we do work through them out loud together she does well. CLE was chosen because it has small chunks of all the skills she has learned as well as a new concept daily. So the amount of problems is also not the issue or I can't imagine that it is.

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Is there a way to "translate" CLE into more manipulative-based math? I'm thinking MUS might be good for her, but if you like CLE maybe you could just add some real-life or manipulative "illustrations" to it.

Is she learning the new concepts easily?

 

I've never even see CLE, and I use Saxon, so I'm not sure if this applies or not.Giving you a bump, if nothing else! :D

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We are taking a little break from singapore math to work in another math text that is more spiral in nature. Each lesson has a mix of problem types. I am noticing that my son does not like this set up as much as just working on more or less one problem type.

 

Interesting. We switched from Rod and Staff years ago because my older one went nuts working with the same problem type all the time. I don't know, she likes the geometry and the word problems and the fractions, all the things where there is a concrete visualization...... I was actually thinking about trying Singapore with her, starting in 2B?

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Lizzie - you describe my dd5th to a T. She is visual-spatial with kinesthetic tendencies. We use MUS because I can implement it with lots of different learning styles but it still has lots of practice problems. My dd5th just can't deal with a page of problems to answer so I break them up for her. We use a lot of different methods for doing the problems then transfer the answers to the book. The reason we put the answers in the book is to get her to see that she can answer all the problems on the page...it's not an un-doable task for her. We will break the problems up into three or four groups then she can do some of the problems in the book, on a white board, on the window, on the back patio with chalk, on a cookie sheet with salt, with markers on colorful paper, etc. You get the idea; anything hands on and visual. It takes more time but she does it happily and she retains better. Slowly your dd will start to realize that that paper with all the blank spots waiting for an answer is not her enemy and that she can complete it. My dd is at a point now where saving time has become more important to her and she is actually just doing half of the problems directly on the page. After about half though her brain gets antsy and she has to get up and have some visual-kinesthetic stimulation to continue. She has learned when to recognize this and will move to something hands on before she has a melt down.

 

With your dd I would suggest not even showing her the workpage but instead call the problems out to her and have her pick 1 to 2 methods for doing them then have her call out the answer to you and you write the answers on the workpage. When she has done them all show her the completed workpage. Hopefully she will be very proud that she completed the whole page with no tears!:D Relax and take your time...this too shall pass.

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Lizzie - you describe my dd5th to a T. She is visual-spatial with kinesthetic tendencies. We use MUS because I can implement it with lots of different learning styles but it still has lots of practice problems. My dd5th just can't deal with a page of problems to answer so I break them up for her. We use a lot of different methods for doing the problems then transfer the answers to the book. The reason we put the answers in the book is to get her to see that she can answer all the problems on the page...it's not an un-doable task for her. We will break the problems up into three or four groups then she can do some of the problems in the book, on a white board, on the window, on the back patio with chalk, on a cookie sheet with salt, with markers on colorful paper, etc. You get the idea; anything hands on and visual. It takes more time but she does it happily and she retains better. Slowly your dd will start to realize that that paper with all the blank spots waiting for an answer is not her enemy and that she can complete it. My dd is at a point now where saving time has become more important to her and she is actually just doing half of the problems directly on the page. After about half though her brain gets antsy and she has to get up and have some visual-kinesthetic stimulation to continue. She has learned when to recognize this and will move to something hands on before she has a melt down.

 

With your dd I would suggest not even showing her the workpage but instead call the problems out to her and have her pick 1 to 2 methods for doing them then have her call out the answer to you and you write the answers on the workpage. When she has done them all show her the completed workpage. Hopefully she will be very proud that she completed the whole page with no tears!:D Relax and take your time...this too shall pass.

 

:iagree:

 

Great suggestions up here! We use MUS as well because both of my boys seem to really benefit from the visual-spatial and handson. With MUS once you "get it" and don't need the hands on you can just answer the questions but any time there is a question (for instance my 7 year old struggling with 13-7) we can pull out the blocks and do it physically. The DVD lessons are also short and very simple, most kids seem to like the teacher Mr Deeme.

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