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Do your children want to go to school?


Do your children want to go to school?  

  1. 1. Do your children want to go to school?

    • No, they want to be homeschooled
      136
    • Yes, they have been to school and want to go back
      5
    • Yes, they want to try it but have never been
      6
    • Sometimes they want to go, sometimes they want to stay home
      30
    • other
      14


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Dd went through a brief period of wishing she could ride a bus more often. Then we went to Disney World and by the end of the trip she was done with riding a bus. ;)

 

We've talked about the differences between homeschool and public school or private school, in terms of what time she'd have to get up in the mornings, homework, and so forth. She's very glad she homeschools. :D

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Nope. My daughter went to private and then public school for kinder and first grade. She never wants to go back EVER.

 

My son has never been anything but homeschooled and has no interest in going to school.

 

They are familiar with public school. Hubby is a public school teacher so it isn't like they've never been to one or seen one. They just aren't interested.

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My kids want to go to school. They attend a Montessori school in the afternoons for all the fun stuff and they ask to go all day. Everyday they ask. At 8am when they are eating breakfast they ask if they can go at 8:30 so they can go to school all day. :glare: Every day.

 

Ohhh...Are you asking because it upsets you or because you're considering it? :grouphug:

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The one child who did, went to school for the end of 5th grade. (And knew/knows he can leave at any time, but he is a hppy 15 yr old in public high school). The other two, no. No desire whatsoever. One is 10 (never attended school, not even preschool), the other 17 (who loved school and attended until age 9 when our family became hsers).

Edited by LibraryLover
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My oldest wants to go nut with an end of October birthday missed the private school deadline this year (and public school here is not an option). If she still wants to go next year we will let her try it out. I don't think she will be nearly as excited once she realizes that it isn't all about the playground and art class but she can always come back home.

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Sure, my kids have mentioned it. In fact, my 10th grader is going to school part-time right now and loving it. He's being challenged and has a great teacher. My 7th grader wants to try school, and we may try the local homeschool/school partnership for her next year (she wants to be graded by someone other than mom and know she is smart).

 

My younger kids are not interested. I prefer part-time school here, if at all. We have pretty good schools and a great local private school. So many of my kids' friends start private school at 7th or 9th grade. We can't afford it and they have great academics, sports, and activities. However, my ds just shared with me that he hears plenty of regrets from his friends that go there. Surprised me.

 

Of course your kids are going to want to go to school. They are young. I sent two kids to kindergarten and they didn't want to come home the next year. I just told them that kindergarten/first grade is the party time of all the grades. Mine settled right down and are happy with their many activities.

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Both. I'm considering Catholic school for them for next year because they really want to go.

 

When my dd was 5 she said she wanted to go to ps, and it hurt a little. It shouldn't really, because kids just want to have fun with other kids. My dd was looking forward to riding the bus for some reason. They seem to fixate on the rosey side of school.

 

Now she's adamant that she doesn't want to, because she can't drag her bum out of the bed at the crack of dawn like they do. :001_huh:

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Your kids are still young. Find out *why* they want to go to school.

 

Do they want to ride a bus? Take a city bus one day.

 

Do they want a lunch box? That's too easy.

 

Do they want recess? Try to find a local hs group park day.

 

Sometimes their motives aren't what we think they are.

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My kids want to go to school. They attend a Montessori school in the afternoons for all the fun stuff and they ask to go all day. Everyday they ask. At 8am when they are eating breakfast they ask if they can go at 8:30 so they can go to school all day. :glare: Every day.

 

Oh! But that's TOTALLY different than regular school. Both of my kids went to a Montessori at that age and wanted to go all day (we could only afford 1/2 days the first 2 years, but somehow managed full time the last year). They loved it! However, when they went to a private Catholic school for 1st grade, they were home by Thanksgiving. Sitting in class is a lot different than working manipulatives in a Montessori classroom. I couldn't make ds go back to school if I strapped a rocket to his rear. Dd would go, but she wouldn't choose to go; she's very social and occasionally the grass appears a little greener, but she probably wouldn't want to commit to the whole year in case she might be wrong ;).

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Oh! But that's TOTALLY different than regular school. Both of my kids went to a Montessori at that age and wanted to go all day (we could only afford 1/2 days the first 2 years, but somehow managed full time the last year). They loved it! However, when they went to a private Catholic school for 1st grade, they were home by Thanksgiving. Sitting in class is a lot different than working manipulatives in a Montessori classroom. I couldn't make ds go back to school if I strapped a rocket to his rear. Dd would go, but she wouldn't choose to go; she's very social and occasionally the grass appears a little greener, but she probably wouldn't want to commit to the whole year in case she might be wrong ;).

 

They are spoiled by their Montessori school! I wonder if it would be worth sending them for a year to Catholic school to get it out of their system?

 

I can't believe the overwhelming majority of kids don't want to go to school! :001_huh:

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My oldest son, 10 years old and currently in 5th grade) was in PS for K and loved it, it was all day Kindergarten, but he also had a fresh out of college, 22 year old, wide eyed, very optimistic, teacher with the patience of a saint. Then we moved to VA (for the 2nd time, 1st time he was an infant) and he went to PS for 1st, we pulled him at spring break because he was miserable (I believe a lot had to do with his hearing issues as well as having a very jaded, burnt out teacher that really shouldn't have been teaching 1st grade) He never wants to go back and I very often get notes on the backs of bottoms of his papers that say, "I love you mom, thanks for being the best teacher" which is great to say the least.

 

My dd (soon to be 8 and in 2nd) went to preschool at our then church for about 1 month and although she liked the first week, the last three weren't for her and she's never been to a brick and mortar school since.

 

My youngest has never been anywhere other than home and loves it, although I think it has a lot to do with the fact that I'm willing to indulge his desire to school while being "underwear boy"

 

I have know a mom from my youngest son's gymnastics class who's kids have all been in Montessori from day 1 and she's thinking of moving them to a Catholic school next year because with 4 kids (3 of whom will be in school) they really can't afford the Montessori anymore, and she feels they're will be quite a bit of a shock and adjustment period for them. I've never been to a Montessori school but after hearing about it, I can see why kids would want to be there.

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My daughter wanted to in K and 1st grade occasionally. I would just mention what time kids went to school and what time they came home. I also told her it was like the library hour where she learned about birds and was supposed to keep quiet so the teacher could teach, but you could sometimes raise your hand and ask a question. (She was bored to death by the lecture even though she likes birds.)

 

She does realize that she would get recess and that part of it would be fun along with a few other things, but she is happy being homeschooled. She occasionally thanks me for homeschooling her and enjoys that she has a lot of time to catch lizards and draw. Many of her friends try to convince their parents to homeschool!

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Your kids are still young. Find out *why* they want to go to school.

 

Do they want to ride a bus? Take a city bus one day.

 

Do they want a lunch box? That's too easy.

 

Do they want recess? Try to find a local hs group park day.

 

Sometimes their motives aren't what we think they are.

 

:iagree:

 

Oldest ds was *curious* about school and has been twice for 1/2 day visits, first with a friend and the 2nd time Dh arranged the visit at a local Christian school. The latter visit was just about 2 yrs ago. My son said that although he had a good time there, he *sees* what he has (read: the benefits) at home. Whew! I sure wasn't looking forward to the expense both in time and money of having a child in school.

 

The other two are quite content at home. It's all they've ever known.

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Nope. Mine have never been, and never really expressed a desire to go past preschool age. My oldest two have stated the opposite, that they'd prefer never to go to a school until college.

 

At the preschool stage it was only because the characters in their shows went to school, and a big, yellow school bus conveniently drove by our house every morning.

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My oldest wants to go and will be going in the next year or two. She's a total extrovert and has never loved hsing. I believe we have reached our hsing goals and she will do great in ps.

 

Ds7 likes homeschooling and has never asked to go to ps. There are times that I think he would benifit by being pushed out of his introvert bubble.

 

Dd5 wants to go and I am sure that she would love it. She has a queen bee type of personality and I think ps would be terrible for her character.

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My DD is desperate to go to school. School of any sort. She wrote me a note asking to go to university! She knows she wouldn't learn anything because age wise she would be just finishing Pre-K here and she is way ahead of that. I think the playground is a big attraction and that unknown of what school really is. She has not been and at this point will never go to school :)

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PS, or private but away from home?

 

My pre-K has asked to go to "outside" school. Aside from two kids in the homeschool group, all of her other same-aged peers began formal schooling this year so she's wondering when it'll be her turn to go.

 

My 3rd grader doesn't like our local public school, but wouldn't be upset if I enrolled him in our local private school. He doesn't ask, but he's generally a go-with-the-flow kind of kid. He knows how much I enjoy having them at home with me, so he's happy to be home if it makes me happy.

 

I'd be totally fine sending either kid through our local public schools, and it's not out of the question. We homeschool from year to year, based on our family situation. I'm not married to it.

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I have two in high school that have left my nest to venture outside of our homeschool.

 

My oldest always wanted to go to school. He is very gifted and we never lived anywhere that the public schools could meet his needs. The last place we lived before moving here had public schools that were not safe. All the private schools nearby were catholic which didn't work for us. To go to school here, he had to give up two years of high school work that we had done at home. He wanted to go so badly, he made the choice to do that. He hasn't looked back. It helps that his school is mostly independent study, and his teacher works very hard to meet his needs. It's kinda homeschool away from home. It is nice though that he has someone else to answer to other than me.

 

My next oldest went off to high school this year. The school she attends is able to give her more of what she needs than I could. She loves it.

 

We had planned to homeschool all the way through high school, but plans change. My three youngest are still at home and do not want to go to school. At one point they never wanted to go to school, but as their older siblings have gone the idea is entering their little heads. I think that as young as your kids are, them wanting to go wouldn't be enough for me to send them. We homeschool is just like we are the family that has early bedtimes. Just a choice that as parents we have made for our family because we feel its best. Of course, its not the best for every family. If I were you, I would think about why you homeschool and that would be what would help me decide if our family would continue next year.

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My kids don't want to go to school. My daughter doesn't want to have to wake up early. They don't want to miss out on the classes, field trips, outings, and play dates we do during school hours. They like having to do school for a few hours and be done...no homework. They both want to be taught at their level, and they know their educational needs wouldn't be well met by the public school. They've seen the life their public school friends have to live and don't want any part of it.

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Yes, 2 of my 3 boys want to go back. I actually made the decision to send my youngest son back to PS last week. He thrives on a group setting. He was learning at home, but it was painful. He is much happier at PS.

 

My middle son also begs to go back. He has some behavior issues though and I'm not comfortable sending him back to this school where they lack the ability to deal with him.

 

My oldest has no desire to return to PS.

 

They were all in PS up until last year. The school here is terrible and we pulled them out last year to HS. They will probably all return to PS next year when we move, but they will continue with their math programs at home.

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I have different answers for/from each kid.

 

Dd, 16, wanted to be homeschooled during middle school, and asked to return to public high school.

 

DD, 14, did NOT want to be homeschooled for middle school, although even she agreed it was probably best. It was a challenging couple years. She is now in public high school, at her request.

 

Ds, 8, sometimes yes, sometimes no. He thinks it would be fun (and he's right, he'd probably love it) but likes homeschool too because he gets to spend a lot of time on math and science.

 

Ds, 6, is adamantly opposed to the idea of attending school. He is emphatically not interested. He likes home.

 

Ds, the littlest, is only 4 and doesn't care one way or the other. He'd bloom no matter where he was. He's just that kind of kid.

 

Cat

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My ds was in private school for prek and K. He never really asked to go back, but once he figured out the 1st and up was not playing with your friends and doing a few worksheets he never brought it up.

 

Sending him to a classroom would be like refining Tarzan. He hates wearing shoes, doesn't wear a shirt to school half the time, never sits still, wants free time to explore his wishes, and is a bear to get up and out of the house early in the morning.

 

We do talk about it from time to time, I brought it up this week. He doesn't feel like he's missing anything.

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My oldest didn't want to go to school. We finally put him in last week and he really likes it (most of the time). My 11yo and 5yo don't want to go to school. My 7yo wants to go to school because she wants to be with her friends. What she can't quite grasp is that one friend wouldn't be in her class because she's 2 years younger and if she were at school she wouldn't be spending the whole time playing.

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My DS, age 7, does not want to go to school *AT ALL*. He did go to two years of private preschool (2.5 hours a day, 3 days a week) at a classical Christian school. He loved preschool, actually. But he didn't have a desire to go to K because he didn't want to be "away from me all day".

 

Actually, I think if he had his way, he'd like to stay home and do whatever he wanted (no schoolwork at all!) :lol:. Although yesterday, he said he likes reading, just not his reading he has to do for school. He wants to read what he wants to read. He's very, very independent minded. For example, he spent 1 1/2 hours writing his spelling, but kept asking to watch youtube videos on the Berlin Wall coming down (because that actually interested him.)

 

On the other hand, my 3 year old may be more of a "group" learner. He goes to a private preschool/playtime class (it's not really very academic--they do playdough, painting, storytime, playground), and he *LOVES* it, completely loves it. Even more than my older DS loved preschool.

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My oldest went to ps for K-2. When we decided to pull her younger sister out after K, we planned to leave her in school, but she begged to be homeschooled too. After a year or two, she decided to go back to ps, but by then, we wouldn't let her go back. However, by 8th grade she was withering on the vine at home. I wouldn't let her go to the high school we are districted for, but there is a college prep public charter school nearby. I told her that if she could get into the charter school, she could go. She didn't want to go to that one because of the dress code, but I am thrilled that they have a dress code!

 

She did get into the charter school and she is thriving there. There are only 98 kids in her grade, but they offer a lot of honors and AP classes, plus four foreign languages. The class sizes are small. In my Civics class, we learned strictly American government. Her Civics class is more like a philosophy of government class and they've studied Aristotle, Plato, Socrates, etc. For English, they read whole books, not excerpts. Honors 10th graders are reading Crime and Punishment right now. They essentially graduate with 5 English credits because they are required to take one semester of public speaking and one semester of Rhetoric in addition to English I - IV. There is an emphasis on Fine Arts because that's a priority for the school's founder. This week, she'll be going on a field trip to see a Picasso exhibit at Duke University's art museum. She is able to get excused absences occasionally to go on a homeschool field trip with us; last month, we went to see a Holocaust survivor speak.

 

We have just applied to this school for our current 8th grader. Siblings have priority, so I think she'll get in. She is very right-brained/ mildly dyslexic, so the prospect of putting her in school is a little intimidating. However, she's taking some outside classes this year and doing very well. The school's small size will be a huge advantage for her because in addition to having mild LD's, she is very sensory defensive.

 

My 8 yo is very social and wants to go to school. However, she's also very dyslexic. She will probably go to school at some point in the future after her reading and math are up to grade level.

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Last year my son. 7 than, was talking about how he wanted to go to "real school". So, I bit the bullet and joined a co-op that was fairly structured but was only for 2 1/2 hours. He had to sit quietly during the 1/2 hour opening to listen to announcements and show and tell. Than, there were two 1 hour classes to attend. He had to sit and listen. In order to talk, he needed to raise his hand. Interestingly, I asked him after several months if he was getting to know some of the kids his age. He looked at me like I was crazy and said, "Mom, you can't get to know the other kids because there isn't any time to talk!" :) At some point he asked me how this compared with going to school. I told him that it was similar, but the co-op wasn't quite as strict, and it would be at least twice as long. He never talked about it again.

 

Than my daughter starting saying she wanted to go to school. My son piped up and said, "No, you don't!" :)

 

I think it is hard because they see their friend in the neighborhood go and they think if they went they would see them all day and what fun that would be! Having them realize that it isn't fun and games. Talking about that it takes less time to get through all the work that needs to be done at home so they can explore what they want, those types of conversations also helped.

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