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Those of you attempting rigor, please indulge me!


happygrrl
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There have been a few mentions lately of looking at fellow posters you seem to "match" with and noticing what they are using as a guide to what might work for you. If you are attempting a rigorous curriculum (I'll leave you to define that ;)) I want to see what you are using! If you have any caveats, post those, as well as any thoughts of the future. If all of this is on your sig, then you are allowed to just post a :) and let me see for myself.

 

It is a rainy day, school is done, and I am in a research-y mood.

Please indulge me!

 

(and Spy Car... would you pretty please post what you WOULD do or HOPE to do?)

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Hm, well, I like to think that we *try*. :)

 

I have a young 6th grader doing:

History Odyssey level 2 Middle Ages

additional reading, mostly drawn from the 1st ed WTM 6th grade "required reading" list

Lightning Lit 7

Latin Prep 3 and Lingua Latina

Elementary Greek (we're going through the whole sequence this year -- ds had done level 1 a few years ago, then we set it aside for various reasons, but given the amount of Latin background, it's really easy now)

Algebra: Structure and Method, book 1 (Brown, Dolciani)

Famous Men of the Middle Ages with workbook

Christian Studies 1 from Memoria Press

science is So You Really Want to Learn Science 1 from Galore Park and the Thames & Kosmos middle school Core Science lab kit... If anything, science is our weak spot...

Critical Thinking book 1 from Critical Thinking Press

memory work from Living Memory and other sources

(writing is wrapped up in history and lit; grammar is included in our Latin, Greek, and writing; ds is a natural speller, so we don't study spelling separately)

oh, music is another weak spot. I'm counting ds' 4 hours a week of classical ballet and weekly choir/handbells at the neighbors' church as music.

for art we're loosely doing Meet the Masters...

Mapping the World with Art for geography

Math Olympiad club meets weekly

 

for dd, 2nd/3rd grade:

WWE 2 (finishing up, then we'll move on to 3)

R&S English 3

Spelling Workout D (as busywork -- she doesn't need it really, but it gives her something to do while ds works, lol)

SOTW 2

Horizons (finishing up 2)

a little Singapore and various supplements as time allows

So You Really Want to Learn Science Jr book 1

Minimus class for Latin

fun little literature class where they read and do projects and write about what they're reading

lots and lots of reading on her own

Meet the Masters

Mapping the World with Art

ballet; choir and handbells

memory work from Living Memory

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I just realized that I have nothing specific in my sig, so I should post what we are doing. Sigh. The books on my shelves are much more rigorous than the books open on the table. We are in a break, so I want to give the children a bit more of a challenge (boredom is reigning).

 

Currently:

Math: MUS and LOF (I am scared of Singapore but it is on the shelf taunting me).

LA: R&S (everyone is doing well, but snoozy) Writing Tales and misc. writing for olders (CW not fitting, looking *strongly* at MCT).

Elementary Greek (starting Latin in Jan, probably GLA)

History: read-aloud and documentaries (we have been heavy on history in the past, and are enjoying the break)

Science: reading through "The Way Life Works" by Hoagland/ Dodson, also reading BJU 6 text (to practice text reading) and skipping certain bits

Geography Art and Music: Catch as catch can. Usually taken care of in our real life situations.

Literature: Personal reading and read-alouds using recs from LCC. Will start a more formal structure in the fall.

 

There is so much that is almost OK, but not quite. I am hoping some of you might be using the curriculum I am looking for!

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For my 8 year olds doing 4th grade work:

 

MFW 1850 to MOD

WWE yr 4

Abeka Spelling

Abeka Grammar (supplement)

ILL

Singapore and supplementing with Abeka Math

Math windows

Lively Latin

Rosetta Stone Spanish

Extra Literature reading per WTM and MFW book basket for history/science

extra curricular-

Piano

Bible Bowl

 

My 11 yr old doing 7th gr work:

 

MFW's 1850 to MOD

Apologia General Science

Progeny Press Guides (3 this year)

Abeka's Grammar and Composition

Vocab from Classical Roots A/B

Writing Strands

Singapore 6B (almost finished) then NEM

supplementing math with various things

Fallacy Detective/The Thinking Toolbox

LOTS of extra reading per WTM, MFW book basket and Sonlight books for history/science.

Rosetta Stone Latin/Lively Latin

Rosetta Stone Spanish

 

Extra Curricular -

Bible Bowl

Piano

First Lego League

 

I think that's it.:glare:

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Like Abbey, I like to think that we try for rigor. :)

 

Dd is currently in 4th grade. My sig is actually incomplete. :) In no particular order:

math drill (daily)

key to decimals or percents (one to six pages weekly)

key to measurement or metric measurement (one to six pages weekly)

Hands-On Equations w/ Verbal Problems, getting ready to start LoF Beg Alg in a few weeks (daily)

All About Spelling Level Five (daily)

Spencerian penmanship (daily; this is her choice)

Junior Analytical Grammar (four times a week)

finishing up Writing Tales 2, starting CW Homer A

literature... I don't know if I have a list up on my blog at present. If I don't, I should sometime soon (I'm doing NaBloPoMo, I need ideas for posts!)

Lively Latin

history: 1850-present, loosely using SOTW 4 as our main spine. Generally, she has a supplemental history book and a biography assigned each week. I tried to challenge her reading level on about a quarter of the supplemental books. The majority are at her reading level; a few are below her reading level but were the best choices for the topic covered. I know I don't have this list on my blog but again, check throughout this month.

physics: I've pulled this together on my own, and I have been meaning to, again, immortalize it somewhere. As an overview, we have several books plus two TOPS units, three Science in a Nutshell kits, can't remember the source of the kit for light, and a Thames & Kosmos kit. I have been slack on requiring any writing wtr to science but hopefully we can ramp that up after Christmas.

Vocabulary from Classical Roots 4

Ridgewood Analogies

Logic Liftoff

Mind Benders B

Memory work, including poetry and selections that match with history

 

She takes piano lessons as well as participates in homeschool band (trumpet). She goes to a fine arts enrichment program once a week (drama, art, music), takes martial arts and creative writing at co-op, and swims 1-3 times a week. She also participates in Girl Scouts.

 

 

I admit to being really really slack with ds. Yes, he's only four, but I still have meant to do more than I have this year. He did decide he hated phonics. Ideally, with him, I'd be doing:

Memory work (just poetry)

Right Start A

Handwriting (HWT K book)

phonics (I may have to switch, he's decided OPGTR isn't for him, it seems)

read-alouds (of course)

 

 

As far as the future goes... dd wants to significantly accelerate her science. I plan for her to use several of the AoPS books. We'd like to add a modern foreign language next year, or sixth grade at the latest.

Edited by patchfire
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I don't aim for rigor. I aim for thorough instruction in skill level appropriate material for each individual child. I don't see K-8 as a time for pushing academics as much as a time of moving through skill sets incrementally and preparing them for what comes next.:001_smile:

 

I don't use a prepared curriculum for anything other than math (Horizons for the younger yrs) and French (Tell Me More for the younger yrs.) Everything else is pulled together individually for each child in k-8.

 

High school is a different discussion. :D

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I don't aim for rigor. I aim for thorough instruction in skill level appropriate material for each individual child. I don't see K-8 as a time for pushing academics as much as a time of moving through skill sets incrementally and preparing them for what comes next.:001_smile:

 

I don't use a prepared curriculum for anything other than math (Horizons for the younger yrs) and French (Tell Me More for the younger yrs.) Everything else is pulled together individually for each child in k-8.

 

High school is a different discussion. :D

 

I like this! It seems to be a difficult balance, finding those materials that get us to this point (mastery of skill sets). I don't have enough confidence in my abilities to do that without curriculum, I wish I did! It seems like those programs described as rigorous are those that do. the. job.

 

I can't wait until high school. I am looking forward to the long discussions and the exploration. But how to get them to that point? Perhaps I need to refocus on my ultimate goals.

 

I'd love to hear more of your thoughts... you are one of the posters I had in mind :)

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MATH

Singapore PM5, CWP, IP,

EPGY

LOF

 

Grammar

Kiss Grammar 4

MCT/Grammar Town

 

Experiences with writing styles4

Reading Detective

Read & Understand Poetry

 

 

History/Geo

Loads Of Living Books

CHOW

Usb World Hist,

Bible

World Map Skills 6

 

Science

MPH Science5/6

RS4K Chem/Phys

Lotsa' Living Books

 

Art

RS4K Art KOG,

Zeezok Composer Biographies

 

Misc

 

Critical Thinking/Logic Books and activities

 

Lots of time for free reading, drawing, etc.

 

 

ETA: I forgot our most challenging subject- HANDWRITING! OY!

Edited by Blessedfamily
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I don't aim for rigor. I aim for thorough instruction in skill level appropriate material for each individual child. I don't see K-8 as a time for pushing academics as much as a time of moving through skill sets incrementally and preparing them for what comes next.:001_smile:

 

I don't use a prepared curriculum for anything other than math (Horizons for the younger yrs) and French (Tell Me More for the younger yrs.) Everything else is pulled together individually for each child in k-8.

 

High school is a different discussion. :D

 

Sigh. I've always wanted to be a fly on the wall at your house. I remember the thread on how you do science. Have you always taught the same way? I keep thinking your approach requires years of experience, many shelves of resources, and a certain level of bravery.

 

Sorry Happygrrl, I digress.:tongue_smilie:

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I think all our curriculum is in my signature for my 7 year old. We will finish RS D in January. In addition, we are doing a lot of history related literature and working our way through booklists, for example ds just read Rosemary Sutclif's version of Beowulf. We are emphasizing writing this year and besides doing WT 1 we do two history narrations and one book narrations a week (depending on the day and topic is about 1/2 - 1 page per day). We are also going to start typing (to help with all that writing!) and work in some sort of spelling program.

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Horizons 5 and Singapore 5 for 5th, moving to Chalkdust next year (pre or Alg1)

Horizons 3 and Singapore 3

Noeo Physics 2 with extra science readings, experiments, and a science co-op (We keep a science notebook)

American History textbook, George Washington's World, and LOTS historical non-fiction and fiction living book (various projects/discussions to match, plus a History Through the Ages notebook)

Abeka grammar (switching to R & S next year)

Latin for Children A

Trailguides to Geography daily geography ? and weekly outline maps, discussions and map searching as it fits other subjects

Mindbenders workbooks

Writing Strands (here's my weak point)

copywork/dictation

vocabulary from our literature as we read it

Glencoe literature study guides

memory work

sporadic Veritas Press cards

sporadic Classical Conversations CD (though we didn't join this year)

LOTS of reading

Some Discovery channel or historical video to match our discussions

**want to incorporate current events, mock jury trial next year, the art of arguement

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Well, as long as you're asking because you're generally curious and not because you want to beat yourself up about what you are doing. I think there is a fine line between "rigor" and "what the child will do without storming out in a huff." :001_smile:

 

Our stuff is in my signature line. We don't do the programs all at once. For example, we are either doing Life of Fred or Singapore at any one time, and are either doing Homer A or the Michael Clay Thompson stuff at any one time. The thing that isn't on there, I think, is that I threw together a literature and geography thing based on native American studies. I can give you our reading list if anyone would like it. My son just read "Birchbark House" by Louise Erdrich.

 

ETA: We started Latin Prep Book One only after completing the Latin for Children series (A, B, C). I recommend starting Latin in approximately third grade, depending on the program (you could do Minimus in second grade, for example) and the child.

 

Julie

Edited by buddhabelly
someone asked when folks started Latin
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ds7 in 2nd grade:

Horizons 2 & 3

Singapore 2 A & B

Latina Christiana I

Minimus

TOG Year 4 upper grammar level

Language Arts (grammar, spelling, copy work, dictation) using antique readers, spellers, grammars

Training Hearts, Teaching Minds (catechism)

New American Cursive

memory work from Living Memory

 

Co-op:

Cool Concoctions (science)

US Landmarks

Spelunking (more science/fun cave stuff)

Book Club (reading, book discussion, public speaking)

 

In case Abbey is still reading this thread: TOG Year 4 schedules The Hundred Dresses for upper grammar lit. I was debating whether or not I would get it because I wasn't sure if Ethan would like it. I came across a post you commented on regarding the book and decided to give it a whirl and I'm so glad I did. Thanks for recommending it. :001_smile:

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Well, as long as you're asking because you're generally curious and not because you want to beat yourself up about what you are doing. I think there is a fine line between "rigor" and "what the child will do without storming out in a huff." :001_smile:

 

Our stuff is in my signature line. We don't do the programs all at once. For example, we are either doing Life of Fred or Singapore at any one time, and are either doing Homer A or the Michael Clay Thompson stuff at any one time. The thing that isn't on there, I think, is that I threw together a literature and geography thing based on native American studies. I can give you our reading list if anyone would like it. My son just read "Birchbark House" by Louise Erdrich.

 

Julie

 

 

I agree with your first paragraph, and your second paragraph sounds just like us. :001_smile:

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Sigh. I've always wanted to be a fly on the wall at your house. I remember the thread on how you do science. Have you always taught the same way? I keep thinking your approach requires years of experience, many shelves of resources, and a certain level of bravery.

 

Sorry Happygrrl, I digress.:tongue_smilie:

 

Please digress! That's when we the good stuff really starts happening!

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Well, as long as you're asking because you're generally curious and not because you want to beat yourself up about what you are doing.

Julie

 

Ha! I am genuinely curious :).

 

I *do* have "those" days though... the ones where I take a bottle of wine, some melancholy alternative folk music, a highlighter and all my hs catalogs into my bedroom and shut the door. Everyone knows to leave me alone on those days.

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We started Latin in 4th grade w/my oldest, 3d grade w/my next, and my youngest, who is technically kindergarten is doing Song School and will probably start Minimus after Christmas. She's reading really well and is doing well w/a bit of grammar, so we'll see.

 

For us:

6th grade

CC on Mondays

LCII w/Elem. Greek in the wings

Saxon alternating w/MUS w/Singapore in the wings and Math Challenge and Hands on Equation, which I hope to start soon

Wiggle Woods, which we just started.

Bible Study and Baltimore Catechism

Mind Benders and Fallacy Detective (we start next week)

SWO G, will be switching to WW very soon

R&S Grammar w/AG in the wings

CW Aesop alternating w/WWE

History a mixture of things using Atlas of the Ancient World (nice mix of geography and history) as our spine, w/SOTW thrown in for the youngers. Using KHE also.

HFA for history, art and music

Science--what we do at CC, and on nature studies and field trips. I have RS4K for after Christmas

Reading--follows history. He just finished Golden Goblet and is starting Cat of Bubastes.

Tons of sports. Would love to get piano lessons in.

 

4th grade

CC

LCI--possibly Elem Greek w/her brother

Saxon 6/5, with MUS occasionally and LOF over the summer

Bible and BC

Italian lessons

And the rest is w/ds in 6th.

 

 

K/1

Song School Latin

Italian Lessons

MUS Beta, Singapore 1B

WWE 1

FLL1-2

SWO B

Bible reading

Tagging along w/others when she feels like it.

 

 

We were all about fun our first 2 years of homeschooling. This is the first year I've really stepped it up and so far it is going well. Of course, we could hit a wall in December, but that would be ok b/c I feel like we're really in a groove and all is going beyond my wildest expectations so far.

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for dd, 2nd/3rd grade:

WWE 2 (finishing up, then we'll move on to 3)

R&S English 3

Spelling Workout D (as busywork -- she doesn't need it really, but it gives her something to do while ds works, lol)

SOTW 2

Horizons (finishing up 2)

a little Singapore and various supplements as time allows

So You Really Want to Learn Science Jr book 1

Minimus class for Latin

fun little literature class where they read and do projects and write about what they're reading

lots and lots of reading on her own

Meet the Masters

Mapping the World with Art

ballet; choir and handbells

memory work from Living Memory

 

Question for abbeyej -

Your 2nd/3rd work sounds very similar to ours. With that in mind I'm curious to hear what you think of Mapping the World with Art. I have been looking at it and would love to do it, but was wondering if I should wait a while since it says the targeted age group is grades 5-10. Do you feel like that is because of reading level? Artistic ability? Does your daughter have any problems doing the lessons? I'm thinking of using it as a break from History once we finish SOTW2 and before we start SOTW3.

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What age did y'all start Latin? We did French vocab, but will start Latin next semester.

 

Dd did a year of a class using Minimus (w/ abbeyej) a few years ago... um... first grade? second grade? How bad is it that I can't remember? We also attempted to use Prima Latina w/ classical pronunciation and w/o the religious elements (this was before Song School Latin was out; I do have some Latin background). Dd learned the vocabulary from it and not much else. We tried time and again to do LfC A starting late 2nd grade through 3rd grade. Started over with Lively Latin this year and it's actually getting done plus she's retaining it. :)

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We attempt the rigor found in WTM, but I everytime I reread the Language Arts section, I realize that we are not there yet. Maybe next year :)! Anyways, here's what my dd7 is using this year...

 

  • Language Arts-Writing with Ease, Dictation day by day, Read-Alouds & chapter books tied to history when possible
  • Math-Singapore Math
  • Science-Earth Science/Astronomy for the Grammar Stage
  • History-Story of the World 2: The Middle Ages and selected literature
  • Other-Artist/Composer Study, Poetry, Shakespeare and Art Adventures at Home

 

Hope the helps!

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Question for abbeyej -

Your 2nd/3rd work sounds very similar to ours. With that in mind I'm curious to hear what you think of Mapping the World with Art. I have been looking at it and would love to do it, but was wondering if I should wait a while since it says the targeted age group is grades 5-10. Do you feel like that is because of reading level? Artistic ability? Does your daughter have any problems doing the lessons? I'm thinking of using it as a break from History once we finish SOTW2 and before we start SOTW3.

 

Well, I really, really love Mapping the World with Art. I think it's fantastic. That said, I probably wouldn't use it with a 2nd/3rd grader in most circumstances. The kids are actually doing it with a group, and dd is the youngest (by about two years). Most of the kids are 10-12, and that does seem to work well. The history readings are short, but they might be rather dry for younger ones, and some of them touch on some rather advanced math/geometry/science topics as they relate to the history of cartography. I'm not sure how much dd is actually getting out of the history component at this time. She doesn't love it, certainly. ;)

 

The mapping is doable for a child with good fine motor skills, attention to detail, and a capacity for frustration. It's not that they need to be really fantastic artists -- just able to focus and follow directions and not be destroyed if their map isn't perfect.

 

The activities range from very simple to much more challenging and could certainly be adapted to younger kids (or skipped completely).

 

I guess what I'm saying is that *generally* I wouldn't recommend it for kids younger than 4th or 5th grade. But it's adaptable in some cases, and certainly some kids are ready for it. If *all* that dd gets out of the program this year is a better "picture" of where major parts of the world are, then that's great. I plan to repeat the program with both kids in a few years (and perhaps require them to put more detail on their maps at that time).

 

I think the dvd instruction on drawing the maps is well worth the price of the program and then some. Even if one didn't do any of the history or activities, I think the mapping alone is phenomenal...

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5th grade and Young 4th (4 days a week unless otherwise posted)

 

Religion: Daily Bible Reading; Weekly Family Devotions; My youngest is in a Precepts class and my oldest has a small group study in addition to church.

Lit: Ambleside Year 4 (including Shakespeare); Free read choice not done in reading as evening read alouds and audio books; Higher up and Further In unit study

Reading: DITHOR (mostly using Ambleside Free Read selections where they fit in).

Poetry: IEW Poetry Memorization (daily); Nursery Rhymes in Popular Culture Study (weekly); Goops poems (weekly -for social skills)

Composition: IEW SWI-A, written and oral narrations

Penmanship: Copywork and HWT Cursive (as our public school did not teach this)

Typing: BBC free typing game. (1-2 week; need something else as my oldest as completed all levels)

Spelling: SWR; Dictation

Grammar: Grammarland once a week; (also dictation, Latin, SWR) *Bought Fix-it but will likely wait to next year to implement

Latin: LFC Primer A w/ activity book and history reader

Spanish: Elementary Spanish 3 times a week (grades 3-4 and then will move to grade 5-6)

Math: Singapore w/ Challenging Word Problems; weekly speed drill; Occasionally Math Detective, Mythmathical Battles, Lure of the Labyrinth, Timez Attack or other games; About finished with Life of Fred Fractions

Logic: Logic Liftoff, Mindbenders A2 (once a week)

History: Ambleside Year 4 and tons of field trips; Liberty kids videos (one a week); One additional book going as a reader (choice)

Civics: Ambleside -Plutarch reading; Weekly current event reading

Geography: Child's Geography: Explore His World (once a week); Holling books (one from Ambleside Year 4 and one more that we missed -one per semester, once a week); Monthly quiz using Shepherd's geography (for the US states)

Economics: Money Counts Girl Scout Council Badge (both do it -once a week)

Science: Ambleside Year 4 with Ben Franklin's Easy Experiments instead of Physics at Home-currently on a side unit for term 2 using Snap Circuit Student Guide; Lapbooks and rabbit trails on topics from the It Couldn't Just Happen Unit -especially for Scout badges; 2 classes per term at NC Wildlife Organization; Nature Journal and studies once a week. Various supplemental classes via parks and rec.

Health: Very ad hoc; Usually working around a Scout badge or a field trip opportunity.

Art: Weekly Artist/Picture Study ala Charlotte Mason; I Can Do All Things once or twice a week; Handicrafts at least once a week but often more.

Music: Weekly Composer Study using Themes to Remember as a kick off; Hymn and folksong weekly;Guitar for one child and voice/dance/drama for another child.

 

DD10: Preteen worship team, God Squad Worship team, Bible Small group, Scouts, Horseback riding lessons, Odyssey of the Mind, Co-Op, Dance, Drama, Broadway Dance, Liturgical Ballet and in between sports (just dropped tumbling/cheer and on the look for something else); Beautiful feet History of Horses

 

DS9: Precepts, Historical Swordfighting, Scouts, Guitar, First Lego League, Co-Op (in between football and baseball season); Reading Art of War and several books about battle hitory.

Edited by AuntPol
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The mapping is doable for a child with ... a capacity for frustration.

 

That would be the deal breaker right there! :glare:

 

Thanks for the comments - I'll keep it on my list for a couple of years from now. We're doing Classical Conversations and learning a lot of geography through that, so I think we're fine for now. It sure looks like fun to me though.

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Don't that my list would be helpful, but here goes. Some of the things we'll finish in Dec. and start new in January.

 

Hobbit lit guide (finish in Dec, then back to our BJU Reading 6)

word roots via PR3 (not impressed, tossing when done, haven't decided what next)

Editor in Chief

Grammar Works

Paragraph Writing Made Easy (finish in Dec., then probably Homer A)

Shurley 6 (will start 7 in January)

BJU6 with SM CWP and Math Olympiad book (will start BJU7 with Borenson in Jan.)

BJU6 science and McHenry's The Elements for fun

our own mix of stuff for history, including workbooks on the presidents, presidents' wives, stuff for state study, and artist study

Manners Made Easy etiquette book (ends in Dec., not sure after that)

Living Memory for memory work

Grammar of Poetry (paused for Hobbit, will resume in January)

Guerber Story of the Ancient World plus Victor Journey Through the Bible for our OT survey. Next year plan NT/Church history survey.

Read aloud has been Farjeon, which we seem slowly to get through. Next I want to do one of the Plutarch's Lives books from Ambleside.

 

The real trouble with her is that everything is preferred hands-on. So she wants to DO history, not just read it, DO science, not read it. I still make her read it, lol, but it keeps it exciting. As long as we blow up, build, sew, or eat it, it's great learning to her. :)

 

She does have the Paragraph Writing Made Easy, but we sneak in writing in the other subjects (lit guide, history, etc.). She also had dictation, but we pared that down to make room for the lit guide. It may come back in January, don't know.

 

I think what each kid needs is individual. I never feel like I really know how to scratch her itch. I give her lots of books, time and materials to do the things she likes, and make sure she does the things she wouldn't do naturally. That's all I can do. And like the others, I don't care a flying fig if it's rigorous or not. If her handwriting matures and she comes out knowing her math facts, that will be enough academic gain to me. Oh, and we're starting Greek (and maybe logic) in January and she does Flashmaster. Still doesn't nail her facts, hehe. Oh well, she survives. :)

 

BTW, isn't the best way to spend a Friday night reading through 3,000 posts by your new favorite poster? That's what I do when I need inspiration. Amazing what you'll learn. :)

 

PS. Her math facts aren't as bad as I make them sound. I'm probably over-exaggerating for the sake of effect. She tests just fine and is quite handy with them. I'm just waiting for the amazing moment when she doesn't tell me 2+2 is 5 or go looking for her multiplication table for 6X8. That will be the day. ;)

Edited by OhElizabeth
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Well attempting it, but just about every subject this year bombed. Everything is going really well now so here it is for kindergarten:

 

100 EZ lessons and will follow it up with LLATL read just to make sure he knows the phonograms. (We started with Mc Ruffy phonics K and made it through the 1st wkbk. I think it was just going too slow for ds.

 

Abeka 1st grade math and The Mailbox mix and match games (We started with Singapore primary 1A and RS games)

 

Living Learning Books Level 1 Earth science (We finished RS4K pre level 1 chem over the summer and then started RSO life and that bombed and then we did Science Excursion K in about 1 month)

 

Simply Stated and Abeka 2nd grade History text (started with HO 1 Ancients, then tried Sonlight core 1, we did core k last yr)

 

Abeka 1st grade Health and Healthy Me

 

Hooked on Spanish

 

Hooked on Handwriting, we will move into Abeka K cursive after this ds really wants to learn cursive.

 

Harmony Fine Arts

 

First Time Analogies

 

Critical Thinking Company's Mathematical Reasoning A

 

Sonlight core 1 read alouds

 

Anyway I think we finally found our groove.

 

ETA to say that while I try for a rigorous curriculum, it is more important to me that my ds enjoy it. It does have to be thorough. I still think that Singapore is more advanced than Abeka, but it had my ds hating it. The other day ds told me how much he loves his Abeka math.

Edited by LadyAberlin
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I do not try for rigor because, frankly, that word reminds me of death (rigor mortis.) But I will post what we do with my oldest (Gr.5) as I am quite happy with how our year is going so far.

 

MUS

Mother Tongue Bk II (grammar)

Classical Writing-Homer A

AO Yr 5 for lit.--writing out narrations and book discussions

homemade unit studies for history and science-focusing on outlining, note taking and writing small essays ( a few paragraphs.)

Shakespeare--Hamlet

Plutarch--Poplicola

Poetry--poems by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Greek Mythology--Age of Fable

Latin--LCI

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Rigorous or a bit overwhelmed? :tongue_smilie:

 

6th grade:

 

Math: Singapore 6a/b, CWP, LOF over the summers, moving on to Singapore Discovering Mathematics after that. Dabbling in Hands-on-Equations from time to time as well. Oh, and Math Detective and Code Breakers. The Zaccaro book sits on the shelf and taunts me.

 

LA: MCT Town. We're about halfway through CEI and Paragraph Town now. Still have to start Poetics... May move right on to Voyage after that, or may detour a bit to IEW Ancient History if I decide it'd be fun when we finally get to Ancient History. We were doing a book group with Teaching the Classics, but it's stalled due to scheduling conflicts... Also, Editor in Chief and Word Roots.

 

History: Currently finishing up self-designed US History - we're currently at the Civil Rights Movement. Just saw this at the MCT website - I think I must have it. When we finish that, I plan to start at Ancients with K12's Human Odyssey as spine, also mixing in books and primary sources from The World in Ancient Times series, lots of myths, historical fiction and biography where I can find it, and if I don't totally overload them with this idea, maybe reading and answering questions in parallel sections of Spielvogel's Human Odyssesy. But that might be insane. Oh, and a Map Skills book.

 

Science: CPO Focus on Life Science as spine. Doing this with a coop with biweekly labs. Also outlining The Way Life Works, and other supplemental reading such as Gallant's (not Hakim's) Story of Science series. Currently listening to Silent Spring in the car. (it went with both 60's history and biology...) Also Science Detective.

 

Spanish: 2nd half of Spanish the Easy Way, and Los Viajes de Rosa y Ernesto and some other supplementary stuff.

 

German: German Saturday School, reading

 

Mandarin: We were doing this over the summer through Guavatalk and were going to continue once a week through the year - also has scheduling problems at the moment. May start up again in January, or next summer again.

 

They also do some light logic (Grid and Venn Perplexors, Cranium Crackers) I am also sorely tempted to get one of the Philosophy books from MCT, but where to fit it in??

 

3rd/4th grade:

 

Math: Singapore 4a/b. Have CWP but not getting to it as often as I'd like. Also, Code Breakers, Math Mosaics, Math Detective

 

LA: WWE3, and just starting an outside writing class as well (uses Barbara Mariconda's Most Wonderful Writing Lessons Ever). Sequential Spelling 2. I'm also thinking of adding in some MCT - we got through Music of the Hemispheres this summer; I'm thinking I'd like to do Building Language and Grammar/Practice Island but I'm not sure if I can fit it in. With the other writing, I think Sentence Island would be overkill, though. Also working through the Hayes Outlining book, and Getty-Dubay penmanship. She also has a book group. And Editor in Chief, Word Roots.

 

History: Tagging along with older sisters. I assign supplemental reading at her level. Also has a Map Skills book.

 

Science: Mr. Q Classic Life Science. Also doing this with a biweekly coop for labs/hands-on. Also Science Detective.

 

Spanish: Entre Amigos 2, various supplementary materials.

 

German: German Saturday School, reading

 

She also does the Perplexor books.

 

Art, music and PE they all take classes for.

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Sigh, we try to be diligent and accomplish what we can, rigorous may not be the proper definition for this layout. I aim for hard work balanced with relaxation. Some days we get everything done, others we just do math and writing, so we can unwind in the sun followed by reading at night. This is for my 5th grade dd: (my third grade dd has a line up that is very similar but requires a lot less writing,(WWE) while my first grader lives on easy street and is very relaxed, despite being advanced)

Reading…AO booklist (both aloud and to herself) oral and written narrations

Bible reading/study

Vocabulary: Words pulled from science and literature books, kept in notebook or discussed orally

VFCR

Science: RS4K (revisiting), The Elements (revisiting/finishing), Usborne IL Science Encyclopedia (new, retained from dropped Noeo), Mysteries and Marvels

(many other living books)

experiments

Writing: Wordsmith, IEW (barely into this, but we are doing it nonetheless)

summaries and reports based on literature, science and history readings.

Grammar: currently GWG andWinston Basic (soon to be Abeka and possibly MCT)

grammar discussions, parsing

Logic:

Mindbenders (soon we will add more/different logic, still debating this)

History: SOTW- Living books, rabbit trails from the library (including some younger books that are included in the curriculum I am helping put together) My older girls read to the littles.

US History (my own concoction involving books from the library and websites)

Reading comprehension workbook for US history

Bible history

written summaries and outlines

Math: TT 7,LOF

Music: (not as often as I would like!)

Piano, Viola (just started), Composer study using library books

Foreign Language: Spanish (various programs)

may add Latin or a better Latin root program

Art:

Free art, Picture study, Art books, classes (cheap and occasional)

Typing: BBC

Wow, it looks like a lot all typed out. Day to day, it varies, since some days it seems like we hardly accomplish anything at all. We are having hormonal issues among various other things going on in this household. It’s a struggle sometimes, but very worth every ounce of effort!

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I'm attempting as well. DS would say that it is. :tongue_smilie:

 

6th grade

LFC B

CW Homer (we're taking some time off to work on some foundational skills)

R&S Grammar 6

Dolciani pre-algebra (love this book) will finish LOF Decimals/Percents and work in his new pre-algebra program as well.

Art of Argument

A study on Proverbs (I forget the title right now)

FMoMA with the Story of the Middle Ages

World Geography (focusing on Africa, Asia, Australia, Oceania, & Antartica. the rest were studied last year)

Science Matters this semester

Biology/Anatomy next semester (pulling together materials now)

Art Talk textbook with Art appreciation (different artist/period each month)

Music- theory by learning trumpet, appreciation with different musician each month - We're behind in both art and music.

Lit - LCC recs for 5th (fits the time period for history)

Living Memory

Daily reading

A fun read-aloud as time permits

4H

 

Gah! That looks like a lot but we rotate history, religion, geography, and lit. Art and Music are done 1x/week.

 

He's also started playing Magic: The Gathering with my dh and in monthly tournaments in town. He's gotten quite good and it has taught many life skills. He has gone to work with my dh (carpenter) several times this year as well. So you could add basic carpentry and business skills in there too.

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Hey, my son is only in kindergarten, so most of my list will be prospective ;)

 

Currently

 

Math

Miquon

Primary Math 1A SE (Singapore). Plus Intensive Practice US Ed.

MEP (Mathematics Enhancement Programme) 1A.

Right Start games, abacus activities, place value cards, and base-10 cards.

Tokyo Shoseki's Mathematics and Kyoiku Dojinsha's Mathematics Workbook.

Selected CSMP (Comprehensive School Mathematics Project) exercises.

Cuisenaire Rods, base-10 flats (100s), geoboards, and other manipulatives.

 

Reading/Phonics

Loved the Leap Frog DVDs

Recently finished the Bob book series.

Just starting ETC 2.

Reading MCP readers.

Need more early readers.

Reading tons of great read alouds.

 

Prospective

 

Math

Continue with Singapore, Miquon and MEP.

Think about:

Edward Zaccaro

Hands on Equations

Art of Problem Solving books

Life of Fred

Russian Math 6

 

Language Arts

MCT (Michael Clay Thompson). Decided.

 

Latin

Intro level undecided

Latin Prep (Galore Park)

Lingua Latina ( Hans Ørberg)

 

Logic and Informal Logic

undecided

 

History

Many "living books".

Spine undecided.

 

 

I could pick a lot more "undecideds". But these are some of the things I'm considering for down the road. It's going to be tough as I'm "after-schooling" and time (his and mine) will be a factor in what we can chew off.

 

My aim is to use really smart materials. Ones that inspire love of the subjects and give a good base understanding of fundamentals at the same time. So not "rigor" without joy, nor "joy" without rigor. Materials that hopefully provide both depth and inspiration.

 

And I must mention Moira (nmoira) because, while I will (and do) steal good ideas from many (many) people here, she's always one who seems to like things I like.

 

Bill

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Math:

Right Start C (finishing up)

Singapore CWP 2 & 3

Kumon Word Problems 3rd Grade

Hands-On Equations (finished part 1, waiting on order of Verbal Problems Book)

Times Tables the Easy Way

 

Language Arts:

Story Grammar for Elementary Students by Don & Jenny Killgallon (finishing up)

Peterson Directed Handwriting Grade 2 for cursive

Red Hot Root Words Book 1 from Prufrock Press

Analogies for the 21st Century from Prufrock Press

No Boring Practice, Please! Spelling

WWE 1 (on hold until she's finished learning cursive)

lots of independent reading

 

Science:

The Elements by Ellen McHenry (finishing up)

will be doing Carbon Chemistry by Ellen McHenry

 

History:

unit studies loosely following SOTW Activity Guide using KHE & library books

 

Mandarin:

immersion class

considering starting Chinese Made Easy for Kids for reinforcement

 

Music:

Music Ace software

How to Introduce Your Child to Classical Music in 52 Easy Lessons

will be starting piano lessons in January

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My aim is to use really smart materials. Ones that inspire love of the subjects and give a good base understanding of fundamentals at the same time. So not "rigor" without joy, nor "joy" without rigor. Materials that hopefully provide both depth and inspiration.

 

 

Well said!

(and thank you for speculating :))

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I consider us a rigorous academic family, but it's not about a list of what we use. :001_smile: It's more about lifestyle (reading, conversations, etc.)

 

This year 7th and 8th grade dd are in Classical Conversations Challenge A (I tutor it,) and they also do BJU Life Science, R&S English 7 & 8 respectively, Foerster's Algebra, and Introductory & Intermediate Logic, plus a classics reading list. This has been a departure from our more mom-pulled-together materials (which we will be going back to next year.)

 

7 yo ds spends time reading and "writing books." (He picked up a college girl at Panera tonight - sly little man - by showing her the drawings for his book on the development of plate armor for knights. :D) I also teach him math, Latin, and some spelling/phonics. The bulk of his time is spent running around the backyard, building with LEGOs, or doing chores.

 

I instill a thirst for learning in them young and fan the flames, so no worries here...

Edited by angela in ohio
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I consider us a rigorous academic family, but it's not about a list of what we use. :001_smile: It's more about lifestyle (reading, conversations, etc.)

 

This year 7th and 8th grade dd are in Classical Conversations Challenge A (I tutor it,) and they also do BJU Life Science, R&S English 7 & 8 respectively, Foerster's Algebra, and Introductory & Intermediate Logic, plus a classics reading list. This has been a departure from our more mom-pulled-together materials (which we will be going back to next year.)

 

7 yo ds spends time reading and "writing books." (He picked up a college girl at Panera tonight - sly little man - by showing her the drawings for his book on the development of plate armor for knights. :D) I also teach him math, Latin, and some spelling/phonics. The bulk of his time is spent running around the backyard, building with LEGOs, or doing chores.

 

I instill a thirst for learning in them young and fan the flames, so no worries here...

 

Angela, would you mind elaborating on how you accomplish the statements in bold. Thank you.

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I try to challenge each child, not too sure if we're rigorous. :001_smile: We tried TOG this year. It didn't work for us. I have always pulled things together myself (14 years now) and that just works better for us. I will list my two youngest.

 

4th Grader

Memory Work - Bible verses, poetry, dates, science info

Bible - We are doing a survey of the Old Testament using Greenleaf Guide to the OT.

KISS Grammar

Writing Strands alternating with IEW Ancient History, also writing once a week for history ala WTM.

Streams to the River spelling

Reading along with History cycle - we are in ancients right now. Literature comprehension pulled from everywhere - on Fridays.

SOTW 1 along with lots of other books on the time period. Hands-on crafts/activities every other week or so on Fridays. We also do map/atlas work once a week.

Saxon 6/5

Science ala WTM. We are doing earth science right now. We read the information from How the Earth Works on one day and do an experiment on Fridays.

Matin Latin 2

Handwriting - Getty-Dubay italics

Think Book - Critical Thinking exercises

Art - Art history along with what time period we are studying - using Story of Painting along with videos, The Annotated Mona Lisa and internet sources. Art project of some sort every other week. I like this site for ideas: http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/lessons.html

Music - Composer study on Fridays. We listen to Vox CDs and read the bio from Composers coloring book. They color the picture while they listen.

PE - Gymnastics 5 days a week for 3 1/2 hours plus meets.

 

My 5th grader's is the same except he is in Saxon 7/6 and is using Kingfisher instead of SOTW. He does not do gymnastics, but gets lots of exercise just playing outside and baseball in the Spring. He is also taking classical guitar lessons.

Edited by MamaT
Hit submit before I was finished!
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This is TOTALLY the sort of thread I love to comment on, but I am attempting to actually DO OUR WORK today, and therefore.... do not have the time right now.;) I am supposed to be getting their math and cursive copywork together right now! I am a naughty mommy!

 

I always have more on my shelves than I do, more on my mind that I want to accomplish and more on my plate than I ever have time for!

 

I don't know how "rigorous" you can really be when the first half of the day is pent reading things aloud to boys while they are building with legos, but they seem to be paying attention....

 

i will post more later....really

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