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Aristotle Leads the Way


HRAAB
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After reading through a couple threads on Hakim's Story of Science, I checked out the first volume from the library. My 7th gr. dd is hooked. I'm trying to get some sort of a feeling if it is worth my money (which is scarce right now due to unemployment) to purchase the teacher/student guides that accompany the books. From what I gather, most of the activities are geared towards a classroom. Has anyone here had any success in using the ideas for one child. (I have looked at the online sample, and while I could gather a couple ideas from what I saw, I can't determine if it's worth the price.)

 

If you don't have the guide, how are you using the books besides just reading them. Any ideas.

 

Thanks.

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:bigear:

 

My 12yo 7th grader is working through Apologia General Science, which all of my kids so far have done in the 7th grade. She hates, hates, hates it.

 

I checked out Aristotle Lead the Way from the library too. I wish someone would chime in your question, because I would really love to know the answer.

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:bigear:

 

My 12yo 7th grader is working through Apologia General Science, which all of my kids so far have done in the 7th grade. She hates, hates, hates it.

 

I checked out Aristotle Lead the Way from the library too. I wish someone would chime in your question, because I would really love to know the answer.

 

That's what my dd was using. I think she was about ready to burn it. :001_smile: She's very excited about using the Story of Science.

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Yes, I think the Quest Guides are useful for a solo student. They are geared towards a small group, but if you work interactively with your student, you could still get a good deal of use out of the quest guides.

 

I do NOT think they'd be very valuable as a "study guide" for an independently working student (possible to glean some use out of them this way, but not very naturally, IMHO), but if you are willing to spend an hour or two each week interacting with your child and the text, you could get a lot of use out of the quest guides even with one student.

 

In general, the guides include, for each lesson (a lesson covers anywhere from 1/2 of a chapter to 2 chapters, averaging 1-2 chapters):

 

+ goals

+ theme

+ Who. . . dates, names & quotes from various important figures

+ What . . . vocab

+ Where. . . geographic info

+ background info

+ quotation discussion (interesting quotes!)

 

+ directed reading ---- this is where you'll need to modify it for a solo student. The idea is that segments of the text are assigned as "directed reading" and students work in pairs to read the text and answer questions from the guide / fill out charts comparing things / etc. Often times there are multiple assignments -- say one chart for each of 4 different scientists covered -- and the idea is to assign each chart to a pair of students and then come back together to discuss. You have *all* the answers in your teacher's guide, so I modify this segment when working with my 6 students by sometimes acting as the fourth pair myself if four pairs are needed. You could easily use this solo with just one student. If you want to do a lot of "directed reading" you could use the reading guides/questions as assigned work for the child -- doing a section a day for a few sessions. There is no reason why it needs to be done in pairs. . . it appears to be designed that way so that a weaker student could be assisted by a stronger student. This would be a *great* way to really capture all the details. It is not terribly time consuming. Working with your child would also be a great option if time allows and/or if the child is not able to do it alone. Alternatively, you can just not use all/most of these sections if you wish. We are using it occasionally but not for every lesson.

 

+ When . . . dates

 

+ Cooperative Team Learning -- generally talking through ideas to analyze/summarize/etc ideas from the lesson

 

+ Classwide Activity -- totally great hands on experiements/activities with the idea being it is teacher led (using fire, etc, lol)

 

+ You Be the Scientist -- also totally great hands - on -- designed to be handed off to students to each do on their own (with partners, etc.)

 

etc etc

 

We're doing 1-2 lessons each 2 weeks over 2 hours. As the students have already read the chapters at home, we focus on activities, experiments, etc. We have used the directed reading activities a couple times but they aren't as fun, lol. I think we'll do them once in a while just for practice, but not often. They *would* help the child really master the material if that was a priority. . . but for us, I am just looking to inspire curiousity and enthusiasm and to expose the kids to these people/ideas. I am not really concerned about each child mastering the details. (This is a supplementary science/history course for all 6 kids. . . so it is gravy, not potatos, for us at this time.)

 

The kids also take turns presenting brief oral reports on a person, idea, or place that they've learned about. We're also keeping a class timeline on the wall so we add figures that we learn about each class (easy to do since the quest guides summarize the people/dates for me). We also do some map work -- finding places on the wall maps, globe, and we use some Knowledge Quest maps to keep track of the places we are learning about. (Each child is keeping a dedicated notebook.)

 

Like any curricula, it is worth the $$ only if you are going to use it! I'd say there is a LOT of $$ worth of value packed into the guides, so if you are going to use them regularly you will get a lot out of them.

 

Without the guides, you can still enjoy reading the SoS books, find some experiments/hands-on stuff online or in other science/math books on your own if you think of it, write reports, do a timeline and maps, etc. But, if you really want to do some hands-on and/or some "directed reading" analysis of what you're reading, then I think the quest guides are very helpful.

 

HTH

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