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Geometry mini-crisis


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Here we are, mid semester, and I just cannot grade the Dressler proofs now, although I can grade the LoF ones. However, I have Basic Geometry by Berkhoff and Beatley that does paragraph proofs, has a Teacher's Manual and an answer key that shows the logic involved in the proofs. So, I'm going back to Charon's original advice to me, but only in part, since we'll still use LoF, too. I am really going to have to learn Geometry before my younger two get here, although that didn't happen with my dd.

 

Has anyone else here used this book? If not, has anyone here done paragraph proofs? Would I be crazy to try to do this as a supplementary Geometry for the rest of the semester? Finally, has anyone seen the revised edition of Dressler that Amsco currently carries that has an Answer Key? Is it not as good as the 1973 one? Is the answer key pretty much the same as for the 1973 one?

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Two column proofs are a hand holding device for high school students. There is no mathematical rule that says one must use them! If you think your daughter would be more comfortable with a paragraph proof, this is a non-issue.

 

Having said that, I cannot help you with the broader picture of the current mini-crisis. Does LOF need supplementation? What do you think is missing? If it is proofs, then add some from Berkhoff and Beatle--Charon would not lead you astray.

 

As you know, I love the constructions in Dressler which I think are illuminating. Does LOF have constructions? You might want to keep a few of these in the mix as well as those interesting end of chapter questions (always true/sometimes true/false) that can lead to good discussions and "what if" sketches.

 

Sorry that I do not have your collection of geometry books. Maybe I should acquire some and then develop an online geometry course. ;)

 

Jane

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Two column proofs are a hand holding device for high school students. There is no mathematical rule that says one must use them! If you think your daughter would be more comfortable with a paragraph proof, this is a non-issue.

 

Having said that, I cannot help you with the broader picture of the current mini-crisis. Does LOF need supplementation? What do you think is missing? If it is proofs, then add some from Berkhoff and Beatle--Charon would not lead you astray.

 

As you know, I love the constructions in Dressler which I think are illuminating. Does LOF have constructions? You might want to keep a few of these in the mix as well as those interesting end of chapter questions (always true/sometimes true/false) that can lead to good discussions and "what if" sketches.

 

Sorry that I do not have your collection of geometry books. Maybe I should acquire some and then develop an online geometry course. ;)

 

Jane

 

 

I collect math books because dd doesn't want to have a teacher for math. I think LoF does have constructions, and the other text has a chapter on them. LoF does have 2 column proofs but a. I'm concerned that it could be an unknown when dd applies for college as a science major (perhaps even math;)) and b. the proofs let you simply state "Algebra" instead of the specific postulate, which leads me to think that it may not be rigourous enough for her career goals which do involve math, logic, etc. She is no longer so interested in Biology, but more in Chem & Physics, and, specifically, in DNA (which is rather amusing to me, since I have a cousin who is a geneticist whose dad was a biochemist who did oncology research; she's met my uncle, but never my cousin).

 

This other book devotes an entire chapter to constructions, and she could simply do that chapter and a few paragraph proofs here and there to back up what she's learning in LoF. My big concern is that she's learning logic and thinking skills. Of course, one could argue that Traditional Logic is doing this, but I would prefer she do this in math as well, since TL doesn't cover the entire field of logic (not that we necessarily will, either, of course.) I could simply be over-worrying. I was never worried or nervous about homeschooling until it came to high school. This is far more stressful.

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This is probably a stupid question, but is it really possible to correct proofs without remembering the geometry, even with the answer guide? Wouldn't they vary enough that you would have to understand the geometry to tell if they are right?

-Nan

 

 

This is not a stupid question. Proofs can vary, so dd has had to explain her logic with LoF whenever she varies from what the answer book does. Once I came here for help because she couldn't convince me, and it turned out she hadn't proved it; she did figure out where she went wrong (no one told her how to do it right, just what she hadn't proven). However, if I have some kind of a logic guide combined with the Teacher Manual, I think we can manage some of them. Mainly we're going to do the constructions in this other book, even though LoF has this, and try some paragraph proofs. If her answers are different enough that I can't tell, I'll get some help to mark some of them (I wonder if my brother remembers this after all these years of Physics & Calculus?) and have to drop them after she does a few. At least she'll have had some experience with paragraph proofs and she will still do the 2 column proofs with LoF.

 

I do have to relearn Geometry before my other two get there, even though I didn't manage to do it in time for dd. I'm also going to have to outsource Calculus or else spend the money on something else where they'll grade her work for me. I'd never ask my db to do all that grading as he's not only working full time but has 4 dc involved in many activities. As for Alg 2 & Trig, I'm going to get something with a full answer key.

 

In my mind, years ago, I thought it would be fairly easy to learn subjects or relearn them to teach my dc, but it hasn't worked out that way so far. I have learned a great deal, but I haven't learned Latin, relearned Algebra or learned proofy Geometry, although I did start two out of three of those.

Edited by Karin
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I know. It is difficult. I did ok with NEM because I had full solutions guides for the first two. Then I managed fine after that, for some reason, although I almost quit at that point because of not having anything but the answers in the back of the book. Fortunately, all the answers are there, not just the odds, because often my son botches the entire odd set and needs to try again with the evens after watching me do all the odds. I did not manage to relearn chemistry last year, although I tried. And I'm not being very successful with the Latin, either. I've learned enough to continue teaching myself by just reading, though, which is nice. I need to do better than that right now, though, to continue with my son. And then there is writing... study skills... research skills... and several other things that have me worried.

-Nan

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