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Is this typical? Re:homeschool tutorial


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My children attend a tutorial one day a week. They are in 3rd and 6th grades. We've never attempted anything like this and so far we are not impressed. I don't know if this is typical for a tutorial or if it is just this particular one. Here are a few things that my 6th grader has reported to me:

Boys saying rude things like, "I bet you broke a mirror" and "What are YOU looking at?" ad nauseum, so much that you really can't have a normal conversation.

 

Girls that are boy crazy, having boyfriends, concerned about looks, clothes, etc.

 

Doing things like sitting on others' backpacks really hard as if to break something.

 

Kids thinking it's cool to take others' food, drink out of their drink, etc.,

 

Throwing food, pencils, etc. at each other (I guess when the teacher isn't looking)

 

My kids are not accustomed to this and we are wondering if we are just odd or if there are more people out there that would not like the general ugliness that is going on.

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Most of the homeschoolers we interact with would not behave this way, but there's always that other 20% or so. Personally, I wouldn't participate in any kind of activity with that sort of atmosphere. Who is leading/tutoring this group? You need to have a talk. My dh teaches in ps, and he wouldn't allow kids to act like that in class.

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I think the leadership in various programs really can set the tone, for better or worse. What you describe sounds fairly typical for children of that age from whom a higher standard of behavior is not demanded. It's really unfortunate. I wouldn't say it's "typical" of home school class situations, because obviously they can vary a great deal, but it's not surprising when parents, teachers, and directors don't insist on something better from students and support each other in requiring it...

 

The behavior sounds distressing and frustrating. Whether it's enough to outweigh any benefit from the program is hard to say (without knowing more). It sounds like there may not be a lot of positives to counter them, in your situation. Ugh. (And, unfortunately, when bad behavior is tolerated, the academics are rarely stellar either...)

 

I think I'd be looking elsewhere.

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Sorry that I was so vague about the type of school. It's one day a week, the teachers are paid, parents do not stay. It's not a charter school. They have history, science, art, and writing games. They have quite a bit of homework in history and science. They get a grade but it is not reported to anyone, it's just a formality.

 

Hope that explains it better.

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Sorry that I was so vague about the type of school. It's one day a week, the teachers are paid, parents do not stay. It's not a charter school. They have history, science, art, and writing games. They have quite a bit of homework in history and science. They get a grade but it is not reported to anyone, it's just a formality.

There are a couple of very large "co-ops" around here that are like that. I don't know if they officially call themselves a co-op, since it's not required that the parent participate. But it's basically the same, except the parent can just pay for the class and then drop their kids off each week. Homeschoolers around here call it a co-op, anyway.

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Are they actually getting anything out of it academically? If that is the atmosphere it makes me wonder if much learning is going on. Unless they are getting teaching that you really could not do at home or in another setting, I would pull them out. If you want them there for socialization, you could do a lot better in other settings - not necessarily academic but scouts, sports, church etc.

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My kids are also attending a tutorial one day a week. This is our first year. My kids have not complained about rudeness or bad behavior and they are learning a lot. One of my kids finishes 1 1/2 hour before the other one, so I pick her up then we wait for the other one. From what I've observed, the kids are very polite and mature. I've been pretty impressed.

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I let the kids go back today. Besides the usual bad behavior, one boy blew spit balls at my 6th grader, an older kid cut line on my 3rd grader and then stuck her tongue out at her, and one girl discussed dogs mating.

 

Nice.

 

Then the class made fun of my 6th grader (with a rhyming little chant) because she did her creative writing homework (it was a poem, and she's the ONLY one that did the assignment in her class).

 

I called my mom to vent about the day, and she said that my children NEED to hear and experience this stuff.

 

HUH?

 

 

The children are not going back. I've worked way too hard to instill a love of learning and I'm not going to subject them to such a negative environment.

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My kids have been involved in two co-ops over the years. One is similar to the tutorial you describe--we pay for the classes; there are paid teachers; parents drop off kids and leave. The other co-op is parent-directed.

 

I would never, ever accept the behavior you describe here. That is bad management on the part of the co-op directors. Yes, good for you for yanking your kids out. Make sure you tell the directors why. I would also go so far as to ask for my money back.

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