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I'm previewing Western Civilizations II and Biology Science of Life (library loans). They're both really good but I think Bio will be too difficult for grade 8 and after that my dc attend high school.

 

I put on order at the library Physics in Your Life and Western Literary Canon to preview.

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Well, all of the ones I have enjoyed so far have been too much for my 8th grader -- but I have completely enjoyed them. I am guessing he will be ready by Junior year in HS.

 

I started with "The Age of Pericles" by McInerny (sp) and it was fantastic -- I really needed a grounding in Ancient Greece and by the end I really "got" that period which gave me a foundation of knowledge to grow from.

 

Next I listened to "The Western Literary Canon in Context" and while I learned alot... ALOT and it was interesting, I was looking forward to the end -- but it is a massive course. When he is discussing works that are from his area of expertise, he shines, outside of that area I could tell -- but it was a much better intro to the works than I would have had without the course.

 

Without a doubt I recommend the 3 set Middle Ages series by Daileader. I have already re-listened and learned so much more. And he is funny to listen to.

 

I have started "London" by Buckholz and so far it seems great. I am also working through "Foundations of Western Civilization II" by the same lecturer and it is good. I just find myself wanting to jump into more narrow subjects -- but know I need to doggedly get through the survey course.

 

In my car I am listening to "Power over People: Classical and Modern Political Theory" by Prof. Dalton and I RECOMMEND IT HIGHLY. Deep, clear, superb teaching and explains things in ways that I really grasp. I dare say everyone should listen to this and I will absolutely require it of my son before he leaves home. It explains so much about how we have the politics we have.... and makes you think about your beliefs.

 

I am beginning to trend away from the survey courses but recognize they really helped me get a grip on the big picture.

 

Okay -- the best suggestion I can make is read the review people write -- I always look at how many stars they have and read some comments. To choose between CD or DVD I also read the comments about images, video or maps used by TC near the pricing info. I have gotten through many CD courses but are moving sloooowwwwllllyyy through the video based because of not being in front of the tv. YMMV

 

 

Bye!

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We're currently using Classics of British Literature (just the audio CD's) to supplement Stobaugh's British Literature. All three of my dd's and I are listening to the cd's. I think they're very well done, and the girls agree.

 

I've also been quite pleased with the high school chemistry course -- was a great review for my dd who is taking an honors chem class for dual credit at our local university. Also has been helpful with my 10th grade dd who is definitely not a science whiz -- we're using the Teaching Co. to supplement Apologia.

 

Dh has lots of the music series. One of his favorites is on understanding opera.

 

Have fun shopping!

Yvonne

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Teaching Co courses we have used and enjoyed:

 

WWII: A Military and Social history

The Foundations of Western Civilization (Professor Noble)

Popes and the Papacy (another Prof. Noble course)

American Identity (Prof Allit. I confess, I have a crush on this guy! I also have bought 3 of his books and I want to get his newest course on the history of conservatism in American.)

Understanding Music (Greenberg - fantastic!)

Natural Law and Human Nature (Koterski - I've only watched half of this and plan to show it to my teens at some point, but so far it is excellent!)

Currently using: How the Earth Works for 9th graders Earth Science - fantastic course; love the prof!

Classical Archeology (that's not the accurate title, I don't think, too lazy to run downstairs and look it up!) - just started this one - seems like a real winner my 17 and 14 yo's got immediately sucked into it.

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Has anybody (or anybody else if one of these is mentioned above already) used one of these courses?

 

Shakespeare: Comedies, Histories, Tragedies

Masterpieces of Short Fiction

set: History of Freedom and Books That Made History

High School Chemistry

High School World History

High School American History

Philosophy of the Mind

set: Human Prehistory and Foundations of Western Civilization I

Foundations of Western Civilization II

 

I'm using Biology: The Science of Life right now. It is more advanced than I was hoping for, but it is good. We've only watched the first 4 lectures so far. I bought it just last week.

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Has anybody (or anybody else if one of these is mentioned above already) used one of these courses?

 

Shakespeare: Comedies, Histories, Tragedies

Masterpieces of Short Fiction

set: History of Freedom and Books That Made History

High School Chemistry

High School World History

High School American History

Philosophy of the Mind

set: Human Prehistory and Foundations of Western Civilization I

Foundations of Western Civilization II

 

I'm using Biology: The Science of Life right now. It is more advanced than I was hoping for, but it is good. We've only watched the first 4 lectures so far. I bought it just last week.

 

Netflix has TC high school chemistry and geometry. I've ordered a bunch through my library system to see if I like them first. A couple are not in my library system that I want and will probably get those.

 

I just finished watching the first 12 lectures of Western Civ. II and I LIKE the instructor (library). The content is excellent and each lecture covers A LOT of material. My older ds watched 2 lectures last night to help him with his world history test today (he was too lazy to read his class notes).

 

I just watched lecture 10 of The History of the United States. I bought it a few weeks ago.

 

I have coming from the library one part of Shakespeare: comedies, etc. My older ds is due to start reading Julius Casear soon.

 

HTH!

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I have the high school Chemistry on VCR and my son is watching it in conjunction with Apologia Chemistry. He likes the guy and he helps him to understand. We have checked out How to be a Superstar Student multiple times ( can only keep DVD's for a week and cannot recheck, so we have watched 3 or 4 episodes at a time) and decided to buy it since it is only 25 dollars now. We haven't made it all the way through it, but my oldest son LOVES the teacher and his methods. I need to have my 7th grader watch the one about learning journals to help him with science.

 

Christine

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My oldest's favorite course so far has been "Masterpieces of the Imaginative Mind: Literature's Most Fantastic Works" which we used as the backbone of our literature program last year.

 

"Joy of Thinking" is another favorite, and the "Dark Matter, Dark Energy" course was good also.

 

Although he was my academic advisor in college, Brian Fagan's "Human Prehistory and the First Civilizations" course was pretty disappointing, especially since I'd experienced the university version many years ago. He's a brilliant guy and a wonderful lecturer, but this course just didn't do him justice. :(

 

So far, we haven't really liked any of the high school courses. The science ones are okay, and I just bought the Superstar Student so I'll see how that goes. We didn't like the high school American history at all. Between the teacher's fake accents (which all degenerated into roughly the same annoying dialect), and the costumes, we dropped it after just a few lessons.

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Currently using: How the Earth Works for 9th graders Earth Science - fantastic course; love the prof!

 

Faithr,

I'd love to hear more about how you're using this for 9th grade. What do you add besides the videos?

 

Also, can you comment on this professor's attitude towards a creator? I was unable to stomach the Joy of Science videos when the professor scoffed at all creation-based science in one declarative sentence.

 

Thanks much,

Julie

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Hi Julie,

 

Well, the professor definitely comes from a non-biblical approach to Earth Science. However, he is very likable and his profound sense of wonder at all we've learned about the Earth just glows through his teaching. He doesn't dismiss religion. He often will mention little things showing how man has tried to understand his world around him. And he's mentioned things like the Goldilocks Effect, that is, that in this unimaginable vast process that physically made the earth, everything had to be precisely just right in order for life to develop. When he was talking about the rock cycle, he quotes "from ashes to ashes from dust to dust", which is very accurate imagery to describe how we all are made from stardust, so to speak. He doesn't just stick to Biblical references though and sometimes will refer to other faiths and how their approach might reflect an understanding of how humans fit into the big picture.

 

I think during the lecture on geological time he did made a comment about how the earth certainly wasn't made in 7 days. I hate it when people do that because of course it is 6 days and then a day of rest!!!!!!!

 

I'm Catholic so none of this offends me as I read the story of Genesis as relating spiritual truths about the fall of man but in a mythic form so it is not to be read literally. So none of this stuff actually conflicts with my belief in God or His Holy Word. In fact I find myself getting so awe-inspired by the absolutely incredible story of how science thinks our earth was formed, that I find myself saying "Praise God" under my breath when I learn some idea or concept new to me that blows my mind!!!!! I find this stuff incredibly interesting!

 

All that said, we are only on lecture 9 so I don't know how things go for the rest of the lectures. The whole series is 48 lectures long. We just started watching end of Sept/beginning of Oct and only get about two lectures in a week, then we had the flu for 2 weeks. . . .

 

My 9th grader was supposed to be reading stuff along with watching the lectures, however, that has not panned out yet. I am also hoping to go on a couple fieldtrips this year which I have yet to set up! Also this year my son is signed up to take in the spring, an intensive 6 weeks course, Intro to Chemistry, which will involve a lot of labs, so I'm incorporating that into his science credit this year. But frankly I was going to not worry so much about output (writing, tests, etc) this year. Next year he'll be taking a Biology class which is AP oriented and superintensive, so I don't feel the need to get superacademic about this year. I know he is absorbing a lot from just watching the lectures. He has a genuine interest in Earth Science.

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I think during the lecture on geological time he did made a comment about how the earth certainly wasn't made in 7 days. I hate it when people do that because of course it is 6 days and then a day of rest!!!!!!!

 

:lol: Too funny! If you've been through 9 lectures, you've gotten farther than I did with the other set. I'd be happy with that.

 

Thanks for sharing about your 9th grade plans. I'm having such a hard time with deciding about 9th grade science for my youngest, because he's so resistant to heavy reading and so I want to save that for other subjects next year.

 

Julie

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.. what are the BEST ones you have used.

 

 

We loved John McWhorter's "Story of Human Language." Because of that course, DS14 requested that I put together a linguistics course for an elective for him. Dr. McWhorter has a follow-on course out there now, which I have yet to see. The related course they have on history of the English language (different instructor) is not nearly as good as Dr. McWhorter.

 

Karen

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I like any and all of Kenneth Harl's series. Ditto Elizabeth Vandiver, and Seth Lerer. Thomas Childers is especially popular with dh and ds. Ds likes anything featuring Robert Greenberg.

 

I have not been as impressed with the TC high school series (ok but not great, IMO), but chemistry was the exception. It has been a great help to ds.

 

We usually watched/listened to supplement different classes, but my favorite course on ds' transcript was a homemade course I called the History and Philosophy of Science. The TC History of Science Antiquity to 1700 served as the nucleus, and we read some of the recommended texts along with my own reading list.

 

The tone of the lectures makes me think that these courses have been designed with a diverse audience in mind, and potentially controversial areas are usually discussed in a tactful way. However, I've never bought any of the explicitly religious titles because I'm uncomfortable viewing religious topics through an academic lens. Not that I see anything wrong in doing so; it's just not useful for me at this point in my life. YMMV!

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