Jump to content

Menu

If you don't use a "reading/lit" program for grades 3 and up...


Homemama2
 Share

Recommended Posts

what have you found to be most productive? Do you get lit guides like Progeny Press, or VP....or just read and discuss-maybe do narration? I'm trying to figure this out for next year and "to me" it seems like most of the lit guides include stuff I wouldn't need (cooking/craft projects etc.--We do enough of this with history, there's no time to do it w/ lit too!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what have you found to be most productive? Do you get lit guides like Progeny Press, or VP....or just read and discuss-maybe do narration? I'm trying to figure this out for next year and "to me" it seems like most of the lit guides include stuff I wouldn't need (cooking/craft projects etc.--We do enough of this with history, there's no time to do it w/ lit too!)

 

I've always used the literature lists in WTM. Look at the logic stage and rhetoric stage lists, too, because you may run across simplified versions of those stories you can add to the grammar-stage list. You will also find some things in Book of Virtues that aren't available in kid-sized books (excerpts from Plato, etc.).

 

In grammar stage, I would have my ds tell me about what he read each day (nothing formal or long). Then, he would write a narration when finishing the book.

 

You can do it!

 

ETA: If you think you need help, read the logic-stage reading section of WTM. Certainly, you're not going to be looking for the output of that level!!!! But, if you have those basic analysis questions in your mind, you will find ways to begin working them in (very gently) while you are discussing with your dc. I also found Teaching the Classics to be good "mom information" - stuff I know, and teach by-the-by. But, I never used the system with any of our lit books the way TtC is "designed" to be used (that probably doesn't make much sense -sorry!).

Edited by Rhondabee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never used a lit guide with any of my elementary kids. We don't do any sort of lit analysis until late middle school.

 

With kids the ages of yours, they simply read to enjoy. We talk about the funny things that the characters do, etc. They like to tell me about the stories.

 

When they are a little older and are writing independently, sometimes I pull certain topics from a book for them to research a little more and write a report on, etc. (For example, my 5th grade dd read Turn Homeward Hannah Lee and wrote a report about the differences in manufacturing in the North and South during the Civil War.) In about 5th grade or so, I start having them write character sketches for a few of their books. But most typically, we discuss the books they are reading.

 

I never have my kids write book reports. Book reports encourage writing plot line. When they start writing analytical papers, you do NOT want them to include plot line. It can be a hard habit to break. Book reports serve no purpose than proving to a teacher that a child read the book. (I know exactly what they do already!)

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks alot! Momof7--That's a great point about the book reports! I never thought about that, but it's very true. I'm so glad I have these boards so I can see what the 'veteran hs'ers" do! ;) I feel much better about next year (esp. knowing I don't have to spend $$ for all those lit guides!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't like literature guides either; they always strike me as feeling contrived. Also, I was a voracious reader and always "lost" myself in a good book so I hated the "Read to chapter three but NO READING AHEAD" instructions when I had already read the book the year before so I'm not doing that to them.

 

After Christmas I plan on reading "The Diary of Anne Frank" with dd (as in, she has a copy and I have a copy, we read independently and then discuss) because we saw her diary and an exhibit at the Indianapolis Children's Museum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never used a lit guide with any of my elementary kids. We don't do any sort of lit analysis until late middle school.

 

With kids the ages of yours, they simply read to enjoy. We talk about the funny things that the characters do, etc. They like to tell me about the stories.

 

When they are a little older and are writing independently, sometimes I pull certain topics from a book for them to research a little more and write a report on, etc. (For example, my 5th grade dd read Turn Homeward Hannah Lee and wrote a report about the differences in manufacturing in the North and South during the Civil War.) In about 5th grade or so, I start having them write character sketches for a few of their books. But most typically, we discuss the books they are reading.

 

I never have my kids write book reports. Book reports encourage writing plot line. When they start writing analytical papers, you do NOT want them to include plot line. It can be a hard habit to break. Book reports serve no purpose than proving to a teacher that a child read the book. (I know exactly what they do already!)

 

 

Forgive me if this is "hijacking" a thread, but what do you use for your literature lists for your older (5th grade) kids? Does your literature follow the WTM suggestions, or do you just pick good, quality literature for them to read? BTW, I really appreciate all your posts, Momof7! They are so helpful! :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't use them for every book, and I use them rather lightly. We verbally go over the comprehension questions and any lit element they're focusing on. I do use the vocab lists and writing assignments.

 

I've used the guides from Hillside Education and Progeny Press. The Hillside guides are pretty basic with comp questions and a vocab list for each chapter, with an end of the book writing assignment. The Progeny Press guides are more involved adding focus on literary elements.

 

I've found them a great way to stay on top of reading, introduce some literary elements, and extend vocab and writing instruction.

 

HTH, Stacy

Edited by Stacy in NJ
sp
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For Italian, we go through what they would have gone through if they attended their Italian school full time - that means we have the textbooks they use (I like them, they have excerpts from many works and good activities related to those) and go through their reading list; however, I add a lot of things I deem important as well, especially for my older daughter who is quite a literature person.

 

For English, we don't use any textbooks or curriculum. I compile a list of full works for them to read, taking into account their interests a bit, but not compromising the things I find important. They read those works on their own and we discuss them - sometimes even during their reading we discuss specific points. Some I give them excerpts from some works to read, if I find the whole works to be too hard yet, but wish to get them acquainted with at least some of it (when they were younger I did this with Shakespeare, then with Milton).

 

Most of the time I don't overwhelm them with literary theory (they're only 11 and 12 at present point). What we discuss are usually specific ideas presented in the work (sometimes they choose to research them more), but I do try to gradually shift them into paying more attention to the way those ideas are presented. I did introduce them to some basic arguments, informally, when we discussed the aspects such as the time in a work, the types of narrators, the relationship between the narrator, author of the text and the implicit author of the text, etc. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...