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Sugarfoot

HiB Vaccination Question

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I've been thinking about this for a few weeks, and I'd really appreciate any insight from anyone who has some knowledge about this. Last year, when we took DD 3 for her 2 yo ped. check-up, we were told that she wouldn't be getting a HiB booster, that "the current recommendation is 3." (I think it was 3. I could get her card out and look if anyone wants to know for sure. It was one less than it used to be.)

 

A few weeks ago, when we took DS 2 for his 2 year check-up, the (4th?) HiB vaccine was back. My DH asked why the recommendation is different than it was a year ago. "Well, there's no longer a shortage." :001_huh: I guess I'm really just trying to understand how immunity is affected. Last year, when there was a shortage, it was decided that 3 HiBs are effective, but now that they've "caught up" with demand, everyone's back to giving 4 again. It makes me wonder if the 4th is really necessary. It seems like if it was really an issue, they would have called everyone who had a child who missed it during the shortage as soon as they had a supply come in, or not have allowed such a shortage to occur in the first place.

 

Can someone please give me some actual facts on this? I guess I'd really like to know how much the 4th dose is adding to immunity, and how much does the "timing" between doses matter? DD3 still hasn't had the 4th, since she was due during the shortage, and therefore completed the "recommended schedule of 3."

 

Thanks for any insight!

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You could have the pediatrician run an immunity titer test before you have them get anymore shots, to see if they actually need them.

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Thank you,

 

What does that involve? I'd love to be able to know if everything we're giving them is necessary. The sheer number of vaccinations given to my DC before age 2 makes me pretty nervous, and then when this came up, it just made me more confused. I have no problem vaccinating against serious diseases that can be prevented, but now I'm wondering how they come up with the number of boosters necessary and the optimal amount of time between them.

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Here's just one result of a quick google search, suggesting the booster might not be necessary.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11066183

 

It might also be useful to find out how common H. Flu meningitis is after 2 years old. I think it is less common after age 2-3, because the vaccine isn't required for elementary, only for daycare and preschool.

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From what I understand if a child is older age 2 they do not even vaccinate for Hib because of what the above poster said.

 

My now amost 4 year old contracted Hib when he was 4 monthes old and it turned into bacterial meningitis..very, very scary.

He had the first shot at 2 monthes. They told me this gave him about 90% immunity, obviously not entire.

hope that helps some.

gosh, I sure understand the concern about vaccinations though...

Now they are doing an oral norovirus....it seems they keep adding and adding.

e

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You would have to have an antibody test run to see if she was immune, that would involve having blood drawn at a lab and sent off. You would possibly have to pay for it, since it's not a standard thing done, that might depend on your insurance.

 

The recommendation for number of Hib doses never changed, it was always four doses with most of the Hib shots (there is one formulation that required only 3 doses but that was in Comvax which was a combination shot with Hep B). However, due to a shortage of the vaccine the recommendation was to hold the booster dose (normally given at 12-18 months) and to use the vaccine to give the primary series (2, 4, 6 months usually) and then to give the booster dose when it became available. It's not so much the science changed as that we were doing what we could with what we had and now we are back to being able to do what is the best.

 

It would be nice if "they could have not allowed a shortage to occur". Unfortunately, things happen and vaccine shortages do occur. I know in our office it just isn't feasible to call every patient who still needs that booster dose, the thought is that if parents are bringing them in for regular check ups they should all get caught up at that time.

 

Hib is recommended up to 5 years old.

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Thanks, everyone, I really appreciate all of your thoughts.

 

The link was exactly what I was wondering about. It sounds as if the 4th dose doesn't add much to the series.

 

It also really explains why that would be the recommendation during a shortage---to use what's available for the younger babies who need the first 3, since that's where nearly all of the protection is.

 

Thanks again. I'll stop worrying.:)

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