Jump to content

Menu

Help make my family healthier!! (LONG)


Recommended Posts

I need advice from those of you who have made healthy meals/lifestyle part of who you are. Here's my honest "where we are". I'd be very grateful for your gentle suggestions.

 

We eat meat (all kinds), veggies (frozen, fresh and from a can), fruits (fresh and fruit juice). We also eat too many chips, too many sweets, too much candy. We enjoy grilling. The husband and I are "after the kids go to bed snackers--usually ice cream".

 

I am generally very healthy and have a "slim" build. My husband is generally healthy, has a husky 5' 8" (currently 240 lb) build. He has had some high blood pressure in recent months and is on medication. (Two friends have had strokes in the last month, so I'm worried about this.)

 

I am interested in making a change to our meals/diet/grocery shopping/lives. The ultimate goal is setting a good example of healthy eating for my girls and BEING healthy especially if that involves maybe losing a few (ok 10-15 pounds for me in the form of a very annoying muffin top that is the outward sign of my complete addiction to sweets especially chocolate almond ice cream and my complete lack of exercise) and a few more (ok 40-50 pounds for the husband who eats emotionally) and gets his only exercise from golf and renovating things.

 

What are a few things that I can do immediately that will have the greatest affect on our lives? Note that I MUST have chocolate along the way. :) Open to any and all loving suggestions.

 

I'll start.

 

1) GULP. Must. not. eat. after. 7:00 pm. (Any tips on how to make this easier? I'm really not kidding that I think I'm addicted to sweets. The thought of not eating them make me feel panic-y. The late evening is when the hubby and I cozy up on the couch and watch shows we've TiVoed or something on Netflix.

 

Yes, I am fine to cook, but would be very much helped by some source that lists shopping list, recipes, preparation time frame. A friend recommended Suppers On The Table (a cookbook). LOVE the prep time frame in this, but am not sure how healthy the meals are.

 

ETA: Yes, I am taking steps to get us moving more. Swimming/dance for girls, zumba/swimming/walking for me. Not sure what dh will do in his crazy busy schedule.

 

Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Thank you also for reading this far down.

 

Gratefully,

Edited by lovemywhirlygirls
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, well if you eat out very much preparing 90% or more of your meals at home will help a lot. If you're looking for menu planning google meals 4 moms. The basic meal plans are free and the others are a very small monthly fee and it includes grocery lists. If you have free time you can make your own as well. I'm making up 10 weekly menu's with corresponding grocery lists and I'm going to just rotate them. I'm done with 4, and mostly done with 5 more.

 

Try to make at least 1 meatless meal a week. It's not as hard as it sounds, there are plenty of good meatless meals.

 

If you're looking for recipe books I like Nourishing Traditions, Dinning on a Dime, as well as online sites like Allrecipes.com and Cooking Light's website.

 

As far as chocolate, one thing I've found is keeping those individually wrapped chocolate squares or fun size candy is good because you can eat a small square vs an entire chocolate bar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks wulfbourne and Happy Grace!

 

I'll check out Nourishing Traditions right now. The individually wrapped small chocolate bars is a great idea. I also plan to enjoy a cup of hot tea in the evenings. It will keep my hands busy (holding the warm, cozy cup) and will take a while to enjoy.

 

Ooo, the tea is a really good idea. Especially with the weather cooling off. Plus, many of the teas are naturally sweet, some even have undertones of chocolate in them.

I love tea:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ooo, the tea is a really good idea. Especially with the weather cooling off. Plus, many of the teas are naturally sweet, some even have undertones of chocolate in them.

I love tea:)

tea with chocolate undertones!!!!!!!!! :bigear: Be very specific here. Links are good.

 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are similar to your family, lovemywhirlygirls, although my dh HAS to stay in shape as he is in the military, so he works off the chips by biking to work :)

 

But one thing that we do consistently is shop the perimeter of the store, in other words, buy whatever is in season and fresh and frozen (whole foods, not convenience frozen foods...fruits, veggies if fresh is not in season and we are particularly craving something). We avoid the center (processed food) for the most part. I make my own treats (mostly), bake my own bread, make our soup, etc. Honestly, we don't get out much during the week, except for Bible Study on Tuesday mornings and a play date every couple of weeks. I use this home time to cook. I can't say that we are candy free (especially after the H-ween candy haul :eek:) but we don't eat fried food, casseroles laden with cheeses and processed ingredients, etc.

 

We often have soup and salad or soup and homemade bread for dinner (with homemade dressing), using a bit of chicken as a condiment in the salad, if any is added that is.

 

If you crave chips, get some, but buy a higher quality than Lays or Tostito's. You'll find you eat less because often they are heartier (and more expensive!!! which is a good incentive to eat less!!)

 

Truly, getting away from the processed stuff is a HUGE step in the right direction.

 

ETA: regarding your chocolate love :), I recently read on this board that Dove dark is pretty good for you. We love our chocolate, too, so when we do get it which is not often, we buy good quality dark chocolate, 75% cocoa content and higher, usually European in origin.

Edited by BikeBookBread
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I eat a hard-boiled eggs in the evenings when I get the munchies. It is low-calorie and the protein keeps me from craving more.

 

RE. the chocolate teas. I love chocolate. I love tea. I absolutely detest the chocolate teas! (You may love them but just a word of warning. I was really, really disappointed that I found them so disgusting.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a sugar addict too. It's a real addiction for me. The only way for me to stop is to go cold turkey with sugar. I have to get it ALL out. No sugar, or high fructose corn syrup. I can have the very dark chocolate but that's it. Once it's completely out of my system things like cherries and grapes taste very sweet to me. But they taste like punishment if I've been eating sugar lately.

 

For what it's worth. Not every person is as addictive as me, so you may not have the same problem. But if you do think you're a sugar junkie you could give it a try. Expect a headache for the first three days though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I eat a hard-boiled eggs in the evenings when I get the munchies. It is low-calorie and the protein keeps me from craving more.

 

RE. the chocolate teas. I love chocolate. I love tea. I absolutely detest the chocolate teas! (You may love them but just a word of warning. I was really, really disappointed that I found them so disgusting.)

 

I have only tried one chocolate tea and I did not like it. Those of you who have favorites....please hook a girl up!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My childrens father died from heart disease/diabetes so healthy eating/lifestyle has been drilled into my children.

 

I would go to bookstore or library and check out a ton of books with healthier recipes. Weight Watchers cookbooks have amazing recipes. Cooking Light is also really good.

 

Eat fresh fruit and veggies. Look at what is in season (butternut squash, acorn squash, etc) and then go look for recipes.

 

Get your kids involved!

 

My kids love cooking. You can teach them so much about nutrition while you are cooking together. Let them help pick out recipes or plan out a meal.

 

Exercise together!! Sign up for a walk to benefit a favorite charity.

 

Dust off the bikes and go biking together.

 

If you can't control eating the "junk" food then don't buy it. Or limit it to one item (per person) per week. Each person gets to pick their favorite and once or twice during the week they get to eat it.

 

Stock up on healthy snacks. Air popped popcorn, lite microwave popcorn, fresh fruit (think apple picking), pretzels, make your own 100 calorie packs.

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are similar to your family, lovemywhirlygirls, although my dh HAS to stay in shape as he is in the military, so he works off the chips by biking to work :)

 

But one thing that we do consistently is shop the perimeter of the store, in other words, buy whatever is in season and fresh and frozen (whole foods, not convenience frozen foods...fruits, veggies if fresh is not in season and we are particularly craving something). We avoid the center (processed food) for the most part. I make my own treats (mostly), bake my own bread, make our soup, etc. Honestly, we don't get out much during the week, except for Bible Study on Tuesday mornings and a play date every couple of weeks. I use this home time to cook. I can't say that we are candy free (especially after the H-ween candy haul :eek:) but we don't eat fried food, casseroles laden with cheeses and processed ingredients, etc.

 

We often have soup and salad or soup and homemade bread for dinner (with homemade dressing), using a bit of chicken as a condiment in the salad, if any is added that is.

 

If you crave chips, get some, but buy a higher quality than Lays or Tostito's. You'll find you eat less because often they are heartier (and more expensive!!! which is a good incentive to eat less!!)

 

Truly, getting away from the processed stuff is a HUGE step in the right direction.

 

ETA: regarding your chocolate love :), I recently read on this board that Dove dark is pretty good for you. We love our chocolate, too, so when we do get it which is not often, we buy good quality dark chocolate, 75% cocoa content and higher, usually European in origin.

 

Thank you for your thoughtful response, BikeBookBread. Yes, our middle name is PROCESSED FOOD. I cringe to admit that, but it is currently our reality. SIGH. It all comes back to ME. I have to plan better, shop better, cook better etc. Shopping the perimeter. Good advice. Got any whole foods cookbooks you like or are you one of those gifted gals that can just do it? I'm not getting everything done as it is....much less adding all of this in. HOWEVER, it's that important to me....so maybe those late nights with dh watching movies will have to go for a while.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My childrens father died from heart disease/diabetes so healthy eating/lifestyle has been drilled into my children.

 

I would go to bookstore or library and check out a ton of books with healthier recipes. Weight Watchers cookbooks have amazing recipes. Cooking Light is also really good.

 

Eat fresh fruit and veggies. Look at what is in season (butternut squash, acorn squash, etc) and then go look for recipes.

 

Get your kids involved!

 

My kids love cooking. You can teach them so much about nutrition while you are cooking together. Let them help pick out recipes or plan out a meal.

 

Exercise together!! Sign up for a walk to benefit a favorite charity.

 

Dust off the bikes and go biking together.

 

If you can't control eating the "junk" food then don't buy it. Or limit it to one item (per person) per week. Each person gets to pick their favorite and once or twice during the week they get to eat it.

 

Stock up on healthy snacks. Air popped popcorn, lite microwave popcorn, fresh fruit (think apple picking), pretzels, make your own 100 calorie packs.

 

Good luck!

 

Gingersmom, could I set up a morning email/wake up call with you with pre-recorded one liners like the ones in your post? I can do those things one at a time. If only you were here talking in my ear to cheer me on! Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

tea with chocolate undertones!!!!!!!!! :bigear: Be very specific here. Links are good.

 

Thanks!

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Black-Teas/Cacao-Mint-Black-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Herbal-Teas/Azteca-Fire-Herbal-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Rooibos-Teas/Tiramisu-Treviso-Rooibos-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Rooibos-Teas/Haute-Chocolate-Rooibos-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Popular-Tea-Blends/Energy-ChocoLatte-Chai-Tea-Blend.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Mate-Teas/My-Morning-Mate-Tea.axd

 

 

I think they have more, but those are the ones I can find quickly. I really want to try the Tiramisu one! Can you tell I <3 Teavana :D It is looseleaf tea though, so you'll need something to hold the leaves.

My BIL gave me this teapot

http://www.bodumusa.com/shop/line.asp?MD=2&GID=7&LID=519&CHK=&SLT=&mscssid=BM7XHJTR23V19NAX4WNXVNRT6K2E0EBB

It's great, but you can find plenty of other ones online as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Black-Teas/Cacao-Mint-Black-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Herbal-Teas/Azteca-Fire-Herbal-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Rooibos-Teas/Tiramisu-Treviso-Rooibos-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Rooibos-Teas/Haute-Chocolate-Rooibos-Tea.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Popular-Tea-Blends/Energy-ChocoLatte-Chai-Tea-Blend.axd

 

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Mate-Teas/My-Morning-Mate-Tea.axd

 

 

I think they have more, but those are the ones I can find quickly. I really want to try the Tiramisu one! Can you tell I <3 Teavana :D It is looseleaf tea though, so you'll need something to hold the leaves.

My BIL gave me this teapot

http://www.bodumusa.com/shop/line.asp?MD=2&GID=7&LID=519&CHK=&SLT=&mscssid=BM7XHJTR23V19NAX4WNXVNRT6K2E0EBB

It's great, but you can find plenty of other ones online as well.

ooooooo! I have a tea pot. :001_smile: That minty chocolate tea sounds simply divine. Might be just the thing to kick my evening snacking too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am in complete agreement with BikeBookBread and gingersmom.

 

I love Nourishing Traditions, but wouldn't recommend it as a "get started" cook book. Great as a reference book, but you are not going to flip from processed food to bone broth, organ meats and traditionally fermented foods in a single leap. It's a continuum.

 

Cooking Light is an excellent resource. They cut as much fat and sodium as they can without affecting flavor, use fresh ingredients, etc.

 

For snacks, try some expensive, really good, dark chocolate. The little square you ration yourself is far more satisfying than the kind you shovel in by the handful. We really enjoy popcorn with parmesan and cracked pepper for a savory snack.

 

Oh, and if you're really up for a horror, go to FitDay.com and keep tally of everything you put in your mouth over the day. It can be a real eye-opener. :blink: It gets you thinking about the food choices you're making, though.

 

(And I'm in the love tea, love chocolate, hate chocolate tea camp, too. It doesn't have the correct mouth feel.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love Nourishing Traditions, but wouldn't recommend it as a "get started" cook book. Great as a reference book, but you are not going to flip from processed food to bone broth, organ meats and traditionally fermented foods in a single leap. It's a continuum.

See, I think it would be fine as a 'get started' book. It talks a LOT about nutrition in general which can help someone who's trying to learn the ropes. Also, not all the recipes are bone broth and organ meats. There are plenty of 'regular' recipes for chicken, beef, veggies, etc as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pick one of Gingersmom's suggestions - or any other suggestion that appeals to you - and implement it this week.

 

Next week, add another suggestion.

 

The following week, add another suggestion - maybe you're ready for two this week?

 

You CAN do this - you just can't do it all at once!!

 

Anne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with you Jean. Don't mess with my tea and don't mess with my chocolate :D Chocolate teas? No thank you!

 

I eat a hard-boiled eggs in the evenings when I get the munchies. It is low-calorie and the protein keeps me from craving more.

 

RE. the chocolate teas. I love chocolate. I love tea. I absolutely detest the chocolate teas! (You may love them but just a word of warning. I was really, really disappointed that I found them so disgusting.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If Nourishing Traditions seems like a huge step you may want to ease into things with a book like Healthy Foods by Leanne Ely. There is another one that I borrowed from the library a long time ago but I can't remember the title. It was From... something....to real food. Ugh, if I remember, I'll post it. It had different steps for transitioning into real food.

 

 

I need advice from those of you who have made healthy meals/lifestyle part of who you are. Here's my honest "where we are". I'd be very grateful for your gentle suggestions.

 

We eat meat (all kinds), veggies (frozen, fresh and from a can), fruits (fresh and fruit juice). We also eat too many chips, too many sweets, too much candy. We enjoy grilling. The husband and I are "after the kids go to bed snackers--usually ice cream".

 

I am generally very healthy and have a "slim" build. My husband is generally healthy, has a husky 5' 8" (currently 240 lb) build. He has had some high blood pressure in recent months and is on medication. (Two friends have had strokes in the last month, so I'm worried about this.)

 

I am interested in making a change to our meals/diet/grocery shopping/lives. The ultimate goal is setting a good example of healthy eating for my girls and BEING healthy especially if that involves maybe losing a few (ok 10-15 pounds for me in the form of a very annoying muffin top that is the outward sign of my complete addiction to sweets especially chocolate almond ice cream and my complete lack of exercise) and a few more (ok 40-50 pounds for the husband who eats emotionally) and gets his only exercise from golf and renovating things.

 

What are a few things that I can do immediately that will have the greatest affect on our lives? Note that I MUST have chocolate along the way. :) Open to any and all loving suggestions.

 

I'll start.

 

1) GULP. Must. not. eat. after. 7:00 pm. (Any tips on how to make this easier? I'm really not kidding that I think I'm addicted to sweets. The thought of not eating them make me feel panic-y. The late evening is when the hubby and I cozy up on the couch and watch shows we've TiVoed or something on Netflix.

 

Yes, I am fine to cook, but would be very much helped by some source that lists shopping list, recipes, preparation time frame. A friend recommended Suppers On The Table (a cookbook). LOVE the prep time frame in this, but am not sure how healthy the meals are.

 

ETA: Yes, I am taking steps to get us moving more. Swimming/dance for girls, zumba/swimming/walking for me. Not sure what dh will do in his crazy busy schedule.

 

Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Thank you also for reading this far down.

 

Gratefully,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Start with little steps, one at a time. Here are some suggestions that have helped us. Start with manageable exercise. Something like a gym membership may be something down to think about down the road, but you would be surprised what a brisk walk will do for you first thing in the morning. I would concur with the other posters who advise cutting out the processed foods. It also helps to drink more water than you think you can stand. Get a good multi-vitamin and wash it down with a protein shake first thing in the morning. You can get protein powder mix from Costco in a big bag that will last you a couple months. This really does wonders to jump-start your metabolism. It's also a great add-in for smoothies with fresh or frozen fruit and yogurt for a sweet snack mid-day. Chocolate is a requirement around here. I refuse to adopt a deprivation mindset. It is the first step towards failure for me. I like the options at Trader Joe's for chocolate fixes. It usually helps me to have some of the chocolate-covered-somethings (espresso beans, soy beans) in the kitchen that I can grab a few of and have a bite. That's enough, and I will be satisfied. Also, snacks with a good glycemic index will be filling and not sabotage you later-on. If you try to think "healthy, whole foods" instead of "diet foods" you will be better off. Good luck!:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like others, I don't think "Nourishing Traditions" is a great place to start - too intense, and even bizarre (for me) at times. While I love the idea of kombucha, the reality of it is more than we can do. I like the "Eat Clean" philosophy and have found Tosca Reno's cookbooks to be fantastic. She uses whole foods, but not bizarre things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for your thoughtful response, BikeBookBread. Yes, our middle name is PROCESSED FOOD. I cringe to admit that, but it is currently our reality. SIGH. It all comes back to ME. I have to plan better, shop better, cook better etc. Shopping the perimeter. Good advice. Got any whole foods cookbooks you like or are you one of those gifted gals that can just do it? I'm not getting everything done as it is....much less adding all of this in. HOWEVER, it's that important to me....so maybe those late nights with dh watching movies will have to go for a while.....

 

Oh thanks! :blush: No, I'm NOT one of those gifted gals AT ALL!!! I DON'T menu plan...dh and I are much too much "what are you in the mood for dinner tonight" people. He HATES casseroles with a passion.

 

You know what started us on our "food journey"? When PDG was ready to eat baby food, a friend suggested I make my own baby food. I saw right away what cool food I could make using interesting whole foods that never would be found in a jar of Gerber, and I certainly wasn't going to put processed foods into my homemade baby food! So the changes began. Next came bread. I stopped buying bread and starting baking my own. Next came yogurt. Then the fridge and pantry started to really change...homemade soups, less packaged stuff, I bought a microwave popcorn popper for homemade popcorn (which I hadn't been able to eat for years...packaged microwave popcorn would ruin my digestive system for days...homemade gives me NO problems.)

 

A few fresh things I always keep on hand are fresh herbs including Italian flat-leaf parsley and cilantro, lemons and limes...These few little ingredients at SO MUCH to the simplest of whole foods! Throw some lemon juice, a bit of olive oil, a smidge of kosher salt and some fresh or dried rosemary or thyme onto a chicken and roast it, and you have a meal worthy of Julia Child herself. Fresh lemon juice added to a Caesar salad makes all the difference. Chopped fresh parsley on top of homemade minestrone soup adds so much! These ingredients are relatively cheap, too.

 

As to a cookbook suggestion, I haven't changed my cookbook library at all, other than adding a few ethnic books and serious bread baking books by Peter Reinhart. I rely a lot on Cook's Illustrated, Bon Appetit, Joy of Cooking, epicurious.com ... I just pick and choose which recipes I make, and adjust for less sodium, fat, add whole grains etc. I only use olive oil, real butter (sparingly, except when it comes to chocolate chip cookies :lol:), maple syrup, honey, rice syrup, agave syrup. I have a grain mill so I mill my own whole grain flour, but I also use white flour for artisan sourdoughs, pizza crust, etc. I don't keep sugar free anything in the house -- it's worse for you than the real thing. I truly believe that moderation (is that possible?) is important. But when you are cutting out the processed foods, you have so much more wiggle room for REAL treats in moderation, of course!!

 

YOU CAN DO IT! Take it a step at a time, and you'll be sure of success!

 

On one of those date nights, watch King Corn, Food, Inc., The Future of Food, Fast Food Nation, Super Size Me or one of the others already mentioned and you'll REALLY start changing the way you shop and eat. FAST.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two tips that I like are

 

1) Serve a bit plate of raw veggies (& some fruit sometimes) as appetizers the 20 min or so before supper (and/or other meals). Cut 'em up and put 'em on a plate alone or on occasion with a low fat dip. Whatever doesn't get polished off before dinner's on the table stays on the table for the meal.

 

2) Make a healthy low fat veggie soup as 1st course for most meals. I don't do this but one of my friends does it for every meal. She has easy recipes where she just cooks veggies and blends them with stock and her whole family likes it.

 

Both these ideas help fill you up with healthy stuff. . . which I find easier than totally avoiding the unhealthy. :) If we're full with healthy stuff, then we can be satisfied with a smaller portion of icecream. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a thought if you like something cold and sweet at night: I often have a small serving of frozen fruit at night after the kids are in bed. My favorites are frozen raspberries and frozen blueberries. They're cold and sweet, so for me at least they satisfy that craving for sweets, and you can't eat them fast so it feels more satisfying. Also, it's a good way to get in an extra serving of fruits!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... so I wanted to give it a hearty :thumbup:

 

First of all, because you will get the most value for your money with this book. I have never owned any cookbook or nutrition reference that I refer back to as often as Nourishing Traditions. It's worth every penny of the purchase price and then some.

 

Second, I've heard the advice "begin with the end in mind" and I think it's pretty good advice. Since NT has, in my opinion, the most sound nutritional advice out there, it's where you want to start, because it's where you want to end up. KWIM?

 

Third, there are many, many "ordinary" recipes in it. The whole book is not kombucha, beet kvass, and organ meats. There are delicious salads, finger foods, desserts, and other everyday foods. I recommend the sesame chicken wings. Yummy.

 

Fourth, you do NOT have to attempt to read, absorb, and use the entire book at once. In fact, I would strongly encourage you not to attempt such a thing! It lends itself very well to a slower method. Just pick a topic you're interested in, say fats. Read the section about fats so you learn which ones really are healthy and which ones aren't (and the truth may surprise you), and then determine to change that one thing this month. I mention fats because it's an easy one to start with. Coconut oil, olive oil, and real butter taste so much better (and are healthier too!) than canola oil and margarine -- so that's such an easy place to start. Then, you might decide to experiment with all the wonderful vegetable recipes, and determine to use fresh veggies rather than canned. Start small, make the changes slowly but make them last. When you're ready, you might actually find yourself excited about the idea of making bone broths or kimchi! (I love kimchi! You would never imagine that something that smells so bad could taste so good! :D) And before long, you'll find it's just become habit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second the frozen fruit idea! I used to be a big late-night ice cream eater, and the two best substitutes I've found are frozen fruit and flavored teas. Frozen mango or pineapple chunks taste just like sorbet, and for a really decadent but healthy treat, melt a little organic dark chocolate in the microwave and dip frozen dark cherries in it! You can get big bags of frozen fruit at Costco (or Trader Joe's if you have one). It might seem expensive, but it's cheaper than Ben & Jerry's and better for you.

 

My favorite teas are by Stash; at night I like the decaf Vanilla Chai with milk and either honey or agave syrup (doesn't spike your blood sugar). Stash's Chocolate Hazelnut tea is also good ~ but the secret is to make it double strength (2 bags) and add generous amounts of milk and sweetener (honey, agave, stevia, or organic erythritol)

 

Jackie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

THANK YOU for all of these wonderful responses. Very much appreciated. I'm printing all of this out and will talk to my hubby about this tonight. We'll pick a couple of things and get started. I am encouraged by your thoughtful responses. Thank you.

 

I'll check back so if you think of something you just HAVE TO tell me...:bigear:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a thought if you like something cold and sweet at night: I often have a small serving of frozen fruit at night after the kids are in bed. My favorites are frozen raspberries and frozen blueberries. They're cold and sweet, so for me at least they satisfy that craving for sweets, and you can't eat them fast so it feels more satisfying. Also, it's a good way to get in an extra serving of fruits!

 

My favorite subsitute is a banana chocolate smoothie. I blend one cup of Blue Diamond almond beverage (they used to make unsweetened, but for some crazy reason stopped)and one frozen banana and some ground flaxseed in a blender.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First, eat salad. Eat lots of salad. Three times a day isn't too much if you vary the ingredients and dressings. I know salad isn't a traditional breakfast food, but my dh always makes too much and I end up eating it with breakfast the next day before it wilts and has to be thrown out. It's amazing what a range of foods can go into a salad. Wean yourself of iceberg lettuce and onto dark green leafies like rocket and baby spinach. We even grow our own sunflower lettuce.

 

Take up embroidery and sew on nice white linen. You won't feel so inclined to eat junky foods during your nightly movies if it might drip on your work :)

 

Rosie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We too are working towards a healthier lifestyle. I have 2 boys who are on the verge of being overweight and I am overweight. Only DH and 1 son are thin. Sigh!

 

So far we have committed to whole foods, no prepared foods or junk, and moving in that direction.

 

I do make water kefir. That is my start.

 

Some questions re: Nurishing Traditions. I haven't bought the book or looked at it but I actually want to move towards LESS meat and dairy. We do have access to raw milk and raw cream and have gotten it before and I notice my kids actually drink less of it as it is more filling. I am not opposed to meat and milk, but want to make it more of a condiment than main part of the meals. So, does Nurishing Traditions focus on meat and dairy? I kind of got the feeling it was, but I could be way off.

 

I am trying to learn more, but of course, you get conflicting messages and ideas and everyone things he/she is right.

 

For us, I am moving towards:

 

Whole grains, brown rice, quinoa, barley, flax, spelt, and the like in recipes.

Loads of vegetables, raw and cooked.

Fruits for snacks and for smoothies

No sugar, sugar substitute, or variation of sugar

Use agave, molases, raw honey

Raw nuts and seeds

minimal meat

beans and lentils

 

What I want to learn more about:

 

soaking grains

soup recipes (and stews)

Ph balance foods

drying foods (reading up on Chinese medicine) for a wet constitution

 

 

What I am confused about:

 

Benifits vs. dangers of soy

Dairy products (avoid, do in moderation, good for you?????)

Is wheat really bad for you in whole grain versions????

Are peanuts really unhealthy/hard to digest

 

 

There is more but at this early in the am that is all I can think of right now.

making

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would offer that you make this transition slowly and smoothly, not in one week. It's a lifestyle change, and if you don't want to hate it, you need to take small steps and redirect your palate.

 

The first thing I would do if I were you is to start eating every two hours. Yup. Get a timer if you need to remind yourself. Don't make it a meal, but just enough-kwim? A small portion. You'll really be surprised how much less you eat all through the day if you nosh every two hours. It also cranks up your metabolism and keeps your blood sugar even. (no snacks, but food. Crudite, a small bowl of a dinner, a half a pb and J, a hard boiled egg-that type of stuff). It also trains your stomach to be satisfied with less.

 

After that I would start weaning off the chips and sugars. As I was weaning off the junk, I would start adding the veggies in place.

 

You can also have three or four really healthy meals your family loves and start switching them out. Make enough for lunches the next day and so forth until you're fully there.

 

And, chocolate is so good for you. It keeps your veins and arteries nice and pliable. Elastic-y, instead of hard and brittle with plaque. Just make sure it's a small amount and it's GOOD. No Snickers bars. Dark chocolate, and you'll be surprised how you are satisfied with a small amount.

Edited by justamouse
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I LOVE that embroidery idea! What a wonderful way to keep your hands out of the chips bag! I'm getting some cross stitch patterns today. I can't embroider but I could cross stitch easily while watching a movie.

 

What about having a weekly check in where we can let each other know how we are doing with our healthy lifestyle progress? That could help some of us wanderers on track... Me included.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) GULP. Must. not. eat. after. 7:00 pm. (Any tips on how to make this easier? I'm really not kidding that I think I'm addicted to sweets. The thought of not eating them make me feel panic-y. The late evening is when the hubby and I cozy up on the couch and watch shows we've TiVoed or something on Netflix.

 

The first thing that crossed my mind is that you may have to give up the nightly tv viewing for a while. Just like people who are quitting smoking have to give up old habits and develop new ones, you may need to also. If sitting on the couch watching tv is associated with eating junk, it may be nearly impossible to put yourself in that situation and not crave junk. You could try reading to each other, playing board/card games, or taking a walk together.

 

Tara

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haven't read other posts so forgive me if I am repeating. One thing I do is DON'T BUY THE JUNK! I know I have no self control so I do not buy the chips, ice cream, etc. so there is no way I can eat it!

 

I make sure that veggies are eaten (1-2 serv) at lunch and dinner and fruit is eaten at breakfast. We only drink milk and water (only juice when we are sick). You don't want to get your calories from something you drink! We eat whole wheat everything.

 

We go on a walk everyday. As for dh, he is working 2 jobs and has no time to exercise so he just eats well on the weekdays and then "splurges" on Sundays (will buy some ice cream sandwiches for after the kids go to bed).

 

My kids aren't big snackers but when we do have snacks it is popcorn, carrots, cucumbers, nuts, peanut butter on apples or whole wheat crackers, etc.

 

Breakfasts look like: oatmeal w/bananas or strawberries, hard boiled eggs, yogurt w/granola, jelly bread, fruit, milk, cherios, scrambled eggs, whole wheat muffins (blueberry, apple, zucchini), pumpkin or blueberry pancakes (special treat).

 

Just some things off the top of my head...good luck :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use an e-mail menu service that I love. By sticking to the service, we eat homemade, healthy meals instead of fast food. For $4.95/mo you are sent a week's worth of recipes and a grocery list. The recipes are healthy and usually take about 30 minutes to prepare. If you don't like that week's selections, you can use the website to make a custom menu plan. The website has hundreds of recipes on it. You can accommodate diet restrictions since each recipe is tagged "gluten free", "kosher", etc. These is a free trial available at the website:

 

http://thescramble.com/

 

 

This thread has been very inspiring. Thanks for starting it!

:lurk5:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

tea with chocolate undertones!!!!!!!!! :bigear: Be very specific here. Links are good.

 

Thanks!

 

Yogi Tea makes a Mayan Cocoa Spice that is great.

I also love their Tahitian Vanilla Hazelnut and Chai Roobios.

Stash Tea has several great Chai blends.

 

I have a warm mug in my hands almost all day long~

 

My biggest advice for a sweet tooth, is DON"T BUY ANY CANDY!

If it's in the house, I'll want to eat it.

It will take a few days to adjust, but you can do it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, thank you for all of the responses. Happy that others like me will benefit from your ideas.

 

Wondering if I might have the flu. Hit me out of nowhere last night. MAJOR body aches and headache, slight fever (100.2)/chills, cough. I've taken Advil and am grateful I can now lift my head a bit. As I was lying here hating the body aches/headache I was wondering what bits of wisdom you guys were sharing and thinking about how having a healthier menu plan might help prevent illness. Another good motivating factor. This is not pleasant.

 

Here's to healthy changes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't know if these'll be helpful to you or not...

 

(1) Brush your teeth earlier in the evening. I don't like to eat right after and that may help with the evening snacking.

 

(2) We stopped eating outside of the kitchen/dining room. We were highly motivated to make the change after our son's allergic reaction, so I don't recommend that :glare: but it did stop my husband and me from watching tv in the evening and snacking. Now when we want to snack while watching a program, we have to bring the laptop into the dining room and watch it there. So you can watch and snack in discomfort or be comfortable but not snack.

 

I imagine that'd be much tougher if you aren't jointly agreeing to it and I don't think we'd last without the motivation of the allergy, but that has really made a difference to us with the snacking.

 

Take it easy and cut yourself slack when you backslide. It's tough to make changes - but worth it in the long run!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...