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Sloppy mistakes in math ???


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Our oldest has always had a problem focusing. We switched to Saxon this year and I think he is understanding the material better. However, when I correct his work, it is full of sloppy, lazy mistakes. The ones he does get wrong are only off by a few numbers. He forgets to carry a one or something of that nature. Anyone else have this problem and how did you correct it? I'm thinking of maybe breaking up his assignments. Like doing the facts practice first, then doing history and then going back to the math lesson part. Any other advice?

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Our oldest has always had a problem focusing. We switched to Saxon this year and I think he is understanding the material better. However, when I correct his work, it is full of sloppy, lazy mistakes. The ones he does get wrong are only off by a few numbers. He forgets to carry a one or something of that nature. Anyone else have this problem and how did you correct it? I'm thinking of maybe breaking up his assignments. Like doing the facts practice first, then doing history and then going back to the math lesson part. Any other advice?

 

3 of my students are distractable 10 - 11 year old boys. :lol::tongue_smilie: 2 of them are actually diagnosed add or adhd and are on meds. Sloppy, not doing your best work means you do it over each and every time. As distractable as they are, they are also *able* to make the choice to do it right the first time. Sometimes they don't make that choice, and the consequence is more boring math; not less.

 

Insisting that they show all their work on the lesson answer page, in some semblence of order and neatness also helps.

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3 of my students are distractable 10 - 11 year old boys. :lol::tongue_smilie: 2 of them are actually diagnosed add or adhd and are on meds. Sloppy, not doing your best work means you do it over each and every time. As distractable as they are, they are also *able* to make the choice to do it right the first time. Sometimes they don't make that choice, and the consequence is more boring math; not less.

 

Insisting that they show all their work on the lesson answer page, in some semblence of order and neatness also helps.

 

:iagree:

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3 of my students are distractable 10 - 11 year old boys. :lol::tongue_smilie: 2 of them are actually diagnosed add or adhd and are on meds. Sloppy, not doing your best work means you do it over each and every time. As distractable as they are, they are also *able* to make the choice to do it right the first time. Sometimes they don't make that choice, and the consequence is more boring math; not less.

 

Insisting that they show all their work on the lesson answer page, in some semblence of order and neatness also helps.

:iagree:

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3 of my students are distractable 10 - 11 year old boys. :lol::tongue_smilie: 2 of them are actually diagnosed add or adhd and are on meds. Sloppy, not doing your best work means you do it over each and every time. As distractable as they are, they are also *able* to make the choice to do it right the first time. Sometimes they don't make that choice, and the consequence is more boring math; not less.

 

Insisting that they show all their work on the lesson answer page, in some semblence of order and neatness also helps.

 

3 out of 4 homeschooling mom agree that ... :lol:

 

I do make him do the incorrect problems over. I was just thinking maybe breaking up the math assignments into smaller chunks over the course of the school day would make it easier for him to focus. He would still be doing the same amount of work. I just wish he'd get them right the first time! :banghead:

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In my house they do it again.... and again.... and again if nessesary. If I can't read it, it's wrong.

 

Also, I only assign the evens at first. If he gets more than 3 problems wrong he has to do the odds because he must need more practice. This is a huge incentive to do it right the first time.

 

That is an interesting approach too. Incentives work well with him.

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3 of my students are distractable 10 - 11 year old boys. :lol::tongue_smilie: 2 of them are actually diagnosed add or adhd and are on meds. Sloppy, not doing your best work means you do it over each and every time. As distractable as they are, they are also *able* to make the choice to do it right the first time. Sometimes they don't make that choice, and the consequence is more boring math; not less.

 

Insisting that they show all their work on the lesson answer page, in some semblence of order and neatness also helps.

:iagree:with Joanne. I have also taught my girls to have neat scrap paper work. I know it is scrap paper, but if you keep it organized you can go back and check your work. I realized in the beginning of the year that I was too easy. I needed to expect more from them, so that they will expect more from themselves.

 

Also, if the problem is wrong, they must correct it which cuts into their play time. They do not care for that to happen.;)

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If there are a lot of problems I cut the amount in half. I tell my son that if he gets them all correct he doesn't have to do any more. If he doesn't, he has to do the rest. He is very motivated by this and magically he doesn't make careless errors. I do this for stuff I know he knows how to do.

.

 

:iagree: This is what I do with my dd, only she starts with about 2/3 or 3/4 of the problems.

 

I don't make her correct every problem. Unless she really bombs something, we talk about the errors and move on. FWIW, she is only 8.

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Part of the math assignment is correcting the ones they got wrong. Which means I have to be very faithful in grading the papers right there on the spot so they know what they have done wrong. If it is a sloppy mistake I tell them so (but I don't tell them what they did) and they have to redo the whole problem. If it is something they don't understand, we go over it together.

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Guest janainaz

This happens with my son now and then. I just circle the problems that are incorrect and make my son redo it. I don't tell him what was wrong with them, he has to figure it out.

 

Their mistakes reinforce that they have to pay attention to detail and check their work. I don't make a big deal about it and I do my best to not be negative. I've learned that keeping it light-hearted, maybe cracking a joke, and reminding my son that he's really good at math is the way to get him to do his best.

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