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African American moms or those with AA children


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Please share your favorite hair and skincare products. Also, for those of you who have little girls, can you detail your haircare regimen for them. Also, what are your favorite styles and what do you consider the best styles to keep your little's hair healthy.

 

I have the two most gorgeous (okay, so I am a little biased! :tongue_smilie:) AA children and have spent a lot of time researching but would love to hear from you.

 

Blessings,

 

Lisa

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After we bathe we moisturize our skin. Clear-whitish flakes of dry, dead skin are noticeable on darker skin. We call it, being ashy. Skin looks prettier when it is moisturized.

 

I used to have extrememly dry skin and the thing that works the best is Eucrin. It is whipped vaseline and it is expensive and a pain to apply. The next most moisturizing thing is Vaseline. The third place winner is baby oil. Then, finally there are lotions. Lotions are fine for most people, just not enough for people whose skin is extrememly dry. I have tried almost all lotions and the expensive ones are not worth spending big bucks on because a cheap bottle of baby oil will do better. "But it's greasy." you might say. That's the point. You do not need to buy the skin care products marketed to AAs. If you have the money to spend, and that is what floats your boat, then fine, but most of the AA people I know don't use them.

 

You DO need the hair and scalp moisturizers marketed to AAs. We call the hair and scalp moisturizers "grease." If their hair and/or scalp is very dry buy the kind that looks hard, like lard colored blue or green. If their hair and/or scalp is not as dry, you can use the softer stuff with vaseline-like consistancy. The hair and scalp lotions look appealing but I found that using a tad was not enough and if you use a lot the stuff somehow ends up in the head rest of the car, your pillow case and face and it's a mess. I don't recommend the lotions.

 

You grease their scalps and the ends of their hair. Some kids need that done daily, others can go as long as once a week. Boys with very short hair need very little grease. Girls, or boys with hair long enough to braid need it more. It is not optional. In a pinch use baby oil or Vaseline. Do you know how to grease a scalp?

 

You only need to wash their hair once a week. Do not wash it more than that. If you do not believe me ask people who are AA and have nice, clean, stylish looking hair. If you wash their hair every day it will become damaged and it will look bad. You must use conditioner. Any brand will work. I use Suave. It's cheap and smells nice.

 

Comb the ends of the hair first. Work your way up until you finally are combing by the scalp. Twist the section you already combed so it stays neat.

 

Some people braid their child's hair in small braids once a week. At night the children sleep with a scarf over their hair so it stays neat. This way, they don't have the do their hair every day. I don't usually do that because I don't like sleeping with a scarf on my head in warm weather. I found that it was breaking my daughter's hair off at the hair line, plus it lasted 5 days at the most, since her hair is not as kinky as some, and slips out of the little braids a little easier than some people's. If I had to get her to school by 8:00a.m. maybe I would try harder to make it work, so it could save me time every weekday morning.

 

I like using balls to hold lots of ponytails together and twisting the hair and putting barettes on the ends of the twists. It doesn't take long to do and my daughter thinks it's beautiful. Goodie brand is better than the cheapy cheapy balls whose elastic wears out quickly. The barettes always fall off so just know you'll lose some. Don't sweat it. I take all the barettes and balls out at night because that is more comfortable and puts less strain on the hair, especially around the hair line.

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:bigear:

 

My ds is AA and we hoping to foster/adopt a dd. I will be watching this thread with much interest!

 

As for my ds, right now, I keep his hair cut very short and use an olive oil conditioner then a boar's hair brush. I actually stopped the most wonderful lady in the AA hair care section at Walmart and asked for her help. She was so sweet, helped me pick out a brush and product, she suggested keeping his hair short and even went so far as to give me her cell number in case I needed more help. I could have wept she was so nice about me asking her a bazillion questions.:D

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I have two AA girls that are adopted. After baths, or anytime their skin looks "ashy" we use Lubriderm lotion.

 

When they were little, I tried doing their hair myself. I tried twisties, which are sectioned ponytails that you divide in two and twist to the ends which are secured with a rubber band. I found it was better to have their hair braided to their head every couple of weeks. Their hair stays healthier and grows faster this way. In fact, I am taking them today. If you can learn how to do this yourself, or find someone willing to do this for you, it is the best way to take care of their hair IMO.

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My children are bi-racial. I have twins girls with very different hair. One has dark hair with big, loose curls; and the other has lighter-brown hair with small, tight curls. I don't have much trouble with the loose curls, but the tight curls are a pain sometimes.

 

The best products that I have found are the Sunsilk Captivating Curls line, especially the De-Frizz Creme. You can use it on wet or dry hair. It takes out the frizz and keeps the curls in place, but it doesn't look or feel greasy or wet. It has gotten hard to find around here, so I have been ordering it by the case from amazon.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Sunsilk-Captivating-Aloe-E-7-Ounce-Bottles/dp/B001ET6Y92

 

My husband likes to use this stuff called Stay-Soft-Fro... or something like that... It does work well, but it leaves her hair a little greasier than I want it to be. He says it's because her hair is not dry enough to need something so strong.

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:bigear:

 

My ds is AA and we hoping to foster/adopt a dd. I will be watching this thread with much interest!

 

As for my ds, right now, I keep his hair cut very short and use an olive oil conditioner then a boar's hair brush. I actually stopped the most wonderful lady in the AA hair care section at Walmart and asked for her help. She was so sweet, helped me pick out a brush and product, she suggested keeping his hair short and even went so far as to give me her cell number in case I needed more help. I could have wept she was so nice about me asking her a bazillion questions.:D

 

 

Cute! I agree with her advice: Short hair and a boar bristle brush for boys.

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AA hair has so many textures, you'll need to determine the hair type before you decide. My 2 daughters have different types. One has very fine hair that would be weighted down by too much oil. (Not that you need to use excessive oil on any hair. A little goes a long way.)

 

 

I like to use natural products as much as possible. The problem is that many I find in health food/natural stores are not for AA hair, and are too harsh.

AA hair is very dry and coiled and has specific needs, so you can't just use any product on it.

 

I have yet to find a natural shampoo specifically for AA or AA kids that I like. Some people use a brand called Carol's Daughters, which you can find online and at Macy's. It uses some natural ingredients.

 

For conditioning the scalp and hair, I mix my own shea butter, olive oil, glycerin, and beeswax. I use only a little, and it gives my daughter's hair a nice sheen, without feeling greasy.

 

Remember, AA hair is dry, and water is the only cure for dry hair. Moisture the hair with a product that has a little water and a little oil. Many people use a daily moisturizing cream.

 

On the skin, I use California Baby unscented lotion in the summer, and top it off with some unrefined Shea Butter in winter.

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Thanks for all the great suggestions so far.

 

I have some more information to add. My daughter's hair as well as my son's is very dry with extremely tight curls (they are both AA and Haitian). My son is easy. I keep it short, moisturize and use a boar's bristle brush. With my daughter, normally, I plait it and braid it or do twists. She wears a sleep cap at night. My concern is that she seems to be getting a lot of breakage around her hairline. I try not to pull it tight. It is so hard to comb out. There is no way I can imagine doing it daily. It takes me forever to style it when I do. I do not wash it more than once a week. I normally wash it, condition it and then comb it out in sections but it is so hard to work with. Sometimes I blow it out with a comb attachment but it still kinks up at the ends. I have used a plethora of products from Khemet Biologics to coconut oil.

 

How often do you have your child's hair trimmed? Maybe that is a factor. I do have a salon I take her to every now and then for braiding but it is expensive ($45) and it gets costly. I do love the end result, however. I can cornrow but not great and I always have a problem with her hair staying straight enough at the ends to finish it off. Am I making sense? I also do have a lot of barettes and love that look. That is how her hair is presently.

Edited by blessed2fosteradopt
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Everything that you said you do sounds good....Oh! Do you use a detangler? That can work miracles in AA hair. Unfortunately, I haven't found a natural detangler, so I just have to use one that they recommend at Sally's or another beauty supply place. A detangler will make it easier to comb through.

 

Here's the key.. spray the detangler after you shampoo and LET IT SIT on the hair for a few minutes. Then comb it through. Use a wide toothed comb, always starting from the ends, working your way up to the roots to reduce breakage.

 

If she has breakage at the front, don't use rubberbands of any kind. Plait it. Some people have breakage at the front from wearing braids that go from front to back too much, especially if they're too tight.

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My dd are 5.5 and 18 months. For the oldest, I wash her hair every Saturday and it takes me about 2.5 hours to wash and style. I usually flat twist it in some style. Last week we just did a simple braid leading to afro puffs. We use a shea butter for hair that you can get from Whole Foods. I slick down the edges with a little Jam hair jell (not the best stuff but it works)

The 18month just has two afro puffs. She's not willing to sit to let me get her done in any fancier style.

I will say that I did not know how to do all these twist styles before I had children and it's just been a forced learning...since it would cost me about $45-50 bucks for a salon weekly.

 

Good luck!

 

http://www.thepoweroftwo.typepad.com

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My dd are 5.5 and 18 months. For the oldest, I wash her hair every Saturday and it takes me about 2.5 hours to wash and style. I usually flat twist it in some style. Last week we just did a simple braid leading to afro puffs. We use a shea butter for hair that you can get from Whole Foods. I slick down the edges with a little Jam hair jell (not the best stuff but it works)

The 18month just has two afro puffs. She's not willing to sit to let me get her done in any fancier style.

I will say that I did not know how to do all these twist styles before I had children and it's just been a forced learning...since it would cost me about $45-50 bucks for a salon weekly.

 

Good luck!

 

http://www.thepoweroftwo.typepad.com

 

Well! I've been apologizing to my dd for taking 2 1/2 hours to do her hair, thinking I was too slow. I didn't know that's normal! :001_smile: I'm terrible at fixing hair, so I keep it as simple as possible.

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