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Tell me how you do memory work


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So I am trying to add some memory work into our school work, and I am wondering how you all do it. Everything from how you choose the pieces/info to how you teach the concept to how you actually implement it on a day to day basis.

Ds is 6, and has a hard time with the few things we have tried to memorize (skip counting for example) but otherwise does on or above "level" work in most of our subjects, so I am thinking it might be me...

 

So on a nitty gritty level, how do *you* do it?

 

:bigear:

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We use a memory work binder designed by dragons in the flower bed. It's called Mnemosyne, and it's divided up (I think this is similar to CM) into sections:

 

•Daily

•Odd Dates

•Even Dates

•Monday

•Tuesday

•Wednesday

•Thursday

•Friday

•One tab each for the numeric days of the month 1-30

 

We put new passages in the front under Daily. Each day, the child recites them. When the child masters a daily passage, it's moved back into either Odd or Even, and if there was a page in that section already, it is moved back into a day-of-the-week section. If none of those sections were empty either, then whatever passage I evicted to put the newer one in moves back to the nearest empty numeric day.

 

So, today my children did the daily passages, the odd passages, anything under Thursday, and anything under the 29th (neither has anything there yet). I recite each passage along with my children each day until they can do it independently, in the case of pre-readers. Readers I read it with the first time or several times, then check in periodically to ensure good diction, volume and expression. The whole thing usually takes about five minutes.

 

As far as choosing the passages, some of them come from my copywork books, which I make myself. Others come from our reading. SWB introduces a limerick to memorize the names of the oceans in SOTW3, and we put that in. Lively Latin introduced some poetry, and I put in an excerpt of that. Last year we volunteered for the Obama campaign, and part of his Iowa Primary concession speech went into the binder. We memorize our address and phone number. If it's useful, comes up naturally, or is beautiful, in it goes.

Edited by Saille
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I use the 4x6 box method described on the Charlotte Mason website. I usually pick about 5-6 items for the "daily" - one poem, one Bible verse, one card that has 5-6 states with the capitals to memorize, one card with phonics rule or grammar rules for older kids, a small map of the states in a certain region to memorize, and several books of the Bible. I bought each child a timer that they set for 5 min. when they're reading over their cards. (My oldest child (10) usually requires more time, so he doesn't bother with the timer.)

 

I think the key to a successful memory program is providing an incentive. The easiest thing for me to implement was a reward of 2 M&Ms for every "daily" card they've memorized at the end of the week. I'm pretty stingy with sweets around here, so the possibility of earning 10-12 M&Ms is a real motivator!

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We use a memory work binder designed by dragons in the flower bed. It's called Mnemosyne, and it's divided up (I think this is similar to CM) into sections:

 

•Daily

•Odd Dates

•Even Dates

•Monday

•Tuesday

•Wednesday

•Thursday

•Friday

•One tab each for the numeric days of the month 1-30

 

We put new passages in the front under Daily. Each day, the child recites them. When the child masters a daily passage, it's moved back into either Odd or Even, and if there was a page in that section already, it is moved back into a day-of-the-week section. If none of those sections were empty either, then whatever passage I evicted to put the newer one in moves back to the nearest empty numeric day.

 

So, today my children did the daily passages, the odd passages, anything under Thursday, and anything under the 29th (neither has anything there yet). I recite each passage along with my children each day until they can do it independently, in the case of pre-readers. Readers I read it with the first time or several times, then check in periodically to ensure good diction, volume and expression. The whole thing usually takes about five minutes.

 

As far as choosing the passages, some of them come from my copywork books, which I make myself. Others come from our reading. SWB introduces a limerick to memorize the names of the oceans in SOTW3, and we put that in. Lively Latin introduced some poetry, and I put in an excerpt of that. Last year we volunteered for the Obama campaign, and part of his Iowa Primary concession speech went into the binder. We memorize our address and phone number. If it's useful, comes up naturally, or is beautiful, in it goes.

 

This is exactly what we do. We also use suggestions from Living Memory and use IEW's Poetry Memorization.

 

Blessings,

Lisa

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They simply practice their mapwork 10 min per day by looking at a map, writing in the spots daily and testing on Fridays.

 

For vocab, we do the vocab as a family, unless the older ones opt out. Then I use quizlet for them study in flashcard style. By Wed. they drill each other in teams.

 

For special memorization, I read through it phrase by phrase with them, provide it typed out phrase by phrase, or put it on quizlet.

 

It's really about spending time each day and practice, practice, practice.

 

Forgot to add sometimes we take index cards with phrases on them and we put them in order after dropping them on the ground...think 52 card pick up.

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Every mornimg at the breakfast table we use this memory system http://simplycharlottemason.com/timesavers/memorysys/ to memorize Scripture, but it could be used for other memory work. It works great!

 

When I make up hand motions to go with a verse or a poem it really helps my dc in the memory process. My 5 yr. old dd was at choral practice the other day. While she was on stage waiting, she looked over at me and started doing the motions to one of the verses we have memorized. She was saying the verse without saying the verse :D.

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Every mornimg at the breakfast table we use this memory system http://simplycharlottemason.com/timesavers/memorysys/ to memorize Scripture, but it could be used for other memory work. It works great!

 

When I make up hand motions to go with a verse or a poem it really helps my dc in the memory process. My 5 yr. old dd was at choral practice the other day. While she was on stage waiting, she looked over at me and started doing the motions to one of the verses we have memorized. She was saying the verse without saying the verse :D.

 

 

That's the system we use too. Every kid has their own box, even my four year old. I rarely have to hunt for a memory piece to work on though. They seem to fall into our laps before the last one has been completed. Their boxes are filled with poems, nursery rhymes (Mother Goose), speeches from history, lists of Pharaohs, American presidents, prepositions, scout memory work, etc.

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Thank you all for your great information! I really like the daily/even/odd/weekday/date idea, and I will probably try it out. Anyone have a kid who just can't seem to retain things he hears? As opposed to seeing? I am going to try incorporating hand and body motions where appropriate, and I wonder if there are any other hints for kids who seem to have a hard time with auditory learning. (Ds took until this year to really understand rhyme, and seems to have a tin ear when it comes to auditory issues...) We tried writing the pieces, but being only in 1st grade, the actual effort of writing overbalances the memory aspect.

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I give weekly memory work. On Monday dd gets a set of index cards. She practices them for 5 minutes each day and recites them to me or dh on Friday. At this point I am mainly trying to help her better retain the info we have been studying.

 

This is what they include:

memory verse

2 sentences from history (1 card)

2 sentences from science (1 card)

5-6 Spanish words (made like flashcards)

 

I hope to eventually have her memorize passages from speeches, poems, etc. as she gets older.

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That's the system we use too. Every kid has their own box, even my four year old. I rarely have to hunt for a memory piece to work on though. They seem to fall into our laps before the last one has been completed. Their boxes are filled with poems, nursery rhymes (Mother Goose), speeches from history, lists of Pharaohs, American presidents, prepositions, scout memory work, etc.

 

1. Do you use an index card box or a binder?

 

2. Do you use different colored cards/paper to differentiate between the types of memory work? Or do you just throw it all in together and sort it by day/date?

 

3. If you use cards, do you type these up or just write the piece onto the cards?

 

:bigear: Thanks!

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