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When did you child reach the logic stage?


HiddenJewel
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How old was your child when he/she reached the logic stage?  

  1. 1. How old was your child when he/she reached the logic stage?

    • 10
      7
    • 11
      7
    • 12
      7
    • 13
      2
    • 14
      1
    • 15
      0
    • OTHER
      11


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hit it at 13 1/2. It's like the bulb was off and then it went on. School has been so much easier with him since. It will happen. My son was a late bloomer so there's hope for the late bloomers.

 

I can totally see it happening sooner with my younger son.

 

:)

 

Blessings!!

 

Dee

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I voted "Other", and here's my explanation: All the stages, Logic Stage included, have been a gradual, over a long time transition here. We have 2 DSs who have *always* wanted to know "how things work" (a logic stage question) -- from toddlerhood! We've done critical thinking and logic puzzles throughout their schooling, so they've had pretty good puzzle-solving and logic skills since Grammar Stage. But the asking of the "why" questions, beginning to learn how to analyze, making connections and comparisons -- that didn't start until late middle school and really begin to be a part of their solid thinking until the first 2 years of high school. Just our experience! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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I voted "Other", and here's my explanation: All the stages, Logic Stage included, have been a gradual, over a long time transition here. We have 2 DSs who have *always* wanted to know "how things work" (a logic stage question) -- from toddlerhood! We've done critical thinking and logic puzzles throughout their schooling, so they've had pretty good puzzle-solving and logic skills since Grammar Stage. But the asking of the "why" questions, beginning to learn how to analyze, making connections and comparisons -- that didn't start until late middle school and really begin to be a part of their solid thinking until the first 2 years of high school. Just our experience! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

Thanks, Lori. That is the kind of information I was needing.

 

I hope you don't mind that I borrowed your description and revised my poll on another thread to get more accurate information.

Edited by HiddenJewel
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I voted "Other", and here's my explanation: All the stages, Logic Stage included, have been a gradual, over a long time transition here. We have 2 DSs who have *always* wanted to know "how things work" (a logic stage question) -- from toddlerhood! We've done critical thinking and logic puzzles throughout their schooling, so they've had pretty good puzzle-solving and logic skills since Grammar Stage. But the asking of the "why" questions, beginning to learn how to analyze, making connections and comparisons -- that didn't start until late middle school and really begin to be a part of their solid thinking until the first 2 years of high school. Just our experience! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

Thank you for this description, Lori. It solidified my "no way we're not there at 12.5" answer.:tongue_smilie:Y'all will probably be able to hear me shouting from the far ends of the earth when my ds starts to be able to make connections and comparisons and such.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I still don't understand what the logic stage is. Can I get an example of a logic stage child making connections?

 

 

Making connections as in:

- connecting a cause with an effect

- connecting a choice and the consequence

- based on what came before, being able to make a good guess as to what will happen next

- comparing/contrasting

- beginning to see the individual pieces connect together to get "the big picture"

 

 

Some examples:

 

- History = connecting the decisions made by a country's ruler and the consequences (ex: Stalin's decision to turn all individual peasant farms into giant collectives; individuals no longer profit directly from working hard on their little farms but receive the same pay as anyone else whether they work hard or not; leads to "why work hard; I'll just put in the bare minimum needed like everyone else"; leads to amount of food grown goes down; leads to widespread scarity of food, and thus starvation)

 

 

- Literature = beginning to put the pieces of the plot events together to make a good guess at what will happen next; being able to look at two characters in a work and tell how they are similar and how they are different (ex: in Charlotte's Web, Charlotte and Templeton are both animals, both live on Zucker's farm, both help Wilbur, and both are literate; however, Charlotte helps Wilbur out of genuine love and friendship while Templeton does so only as it benefits him; Charlotte uses her literacy to help and educate others, while Templeton uses his literacy only as a tool to feed his stomach; in the end, the differences in their choices and characters lead to different ends -- Charlotte, though she dies, "lives on" through her legacy of saving Wilbur's life and through her children whom Wilbur nurtures and befriends, while Templeton remains selfish and will probably die unbefriended, alone, and earlier than usual due to gluttony. The student would be able come to these conclusions through a lot of specific questions and prompts from the teacher.)

 

 

- Spelling/Vocabulary = comparing a vowel pattern in a new word with previously learned vowel pattern rules to be able to make an educated guess as to how the word will be pronounced; or, having learned some Greek/Latin roots, being able to look at a word and narrow down possible meanings (ex: in Vocabulary or Spelling, student learned that "photo" in Latin means light; later on, the student encounters the word "photosynthesis" in Science, and can narrow down that the new term will probably have something to do with light).

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Making connections as in:

- connecting a cause with an effect

- connecting a choice and the consequence

- based on what came before, being able to make a good guess as to what will happen next

- comparing/contrasting

- beginning to see the individual pieces connect together to get "the big picture"

 

 

Some examples:

 

- History = connecting the decisions made by a country's ruler and the consequences (ex: Stalin's decision to turn all individual peasant farms into giant collectives; individuals no longer profit directly from working hard on their little farms but receive the same pay as anyone else whether they work hard or not; leads to "why work hard; I'll just put in the bare minimum needed like everyone else"; leads to amount of food grown goes down; leads to widespread scarity of food, and thus starvation)

 

 

- Literature = beginning to put the pieces of the plot events together to make a good guess at what will happen next; being able to look at two characters in a work and tell how they are similar and how they are different (ex: in Charlotte's Web, Charlotte and Templeton are both animals, both live on Zucker's farm, both help Wilbur, and both are literate; however, Charlotte helps Wilbur out of genuine love and friendship while Templeton does so only as it benefits him; Charlotte uses her literacy to help and educate others, while Templeton uses his literacy only as a tool to feed his stomach; in the end, the differences in their choices and characters lead to different ends -- Charlotte, though she dies, "lives on" through her legacy of saving Wilbur's life and through her children whom Wilbur nurtures and befriends, while Templeton remains selfish and will probably die unbefriended, alone, and earlier than usual due to gluttony. The student would be able come to these conclusions through a lot of specific questions and prompts from the teacher.)

 

 

- Spelling/Vocabulary = comparing a vowel pattern in a new word with previously learned vowel pattern rules to be able to make an educated guess as to how the word will be pronounced; or, having learned some Greek/Latin roots, being able to look at a word and narrow down possible meanings (ex: in Vocabulary or Spelling, student learned that "photo" in Latin means light; later on, the student encounters the word "photosynthesis" in Science, and can narrow down that the new term will probably have something to do with light).

 

Thanks, Lori!

 

LOL I think my 2yo is halfway there! When they start cleaning up in Sunday School she starts saying, "I go home now!":D

 

Seriously, this helps me to see that my 12.5 is *almost* there. He's still not great at cause/effect or the big picture.:tongue_smilie:

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