Jump to content

Menu

Does it ever bother you... Reading Lists/Documentation


Recommended Posts

Does it ever bother you that we, as homeschoolers, are (often) asked/required to submit data on every nitnoid piece of material we've ever used, yet private, charter, and public school students are not? Edit: I'm specifically thinking about when a kid wants to apply to college, though it could apply elsewhere.

 

The reading lists post on the high school board made me think about this, but I've seen other threads as well.

 

I understand that public schools ostensibly are utilizing curricula that has been "thoroughly tested and approved" by numerous, highly qualified committees -- but I also know the reality (I have quite a few school teacher friends) - that many times that curricula is crap. And that, quite often, though the teachers say they are using it, they really aren't. Are they documenting what they ARE using? Of course not.

 

And what about the actual absorption of material? Sure, my kid went to public school for 4th grade. He got the report card. By the authorities of the state of _________ he successfully completed their curriculum. Guess what? He went backwards from where he was in 3rd grade. How many other kids have this happen due to absent teachers, "permanent" substitutes, continual absences, disruptions in the classroom (that was what did it for my kid), a culture of fear, etc. etc.

 

How about private schools? Say a kid went to a small, religious school. In every town I've lived (which has been many), it is generally assumed that such an environment is better than the local public school - even when it is clearly not. These private schools are not submitting their curricula for state review. These students are not submitting portfolios of everything they've read to colleges.

 

Why are we?

 

 

a

Edited by asta
trying to make more sense
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I did my student teaching for my credential, I had to do 3 lesson plans for formal submission. They had to be typed, in a certain format, clearly state the objectives I would cover, describe how I would teach the topic (including examples), and describe how I'd assess student learning (including examples). For an hour-long class, it took me well over two hours to write the dratted plans up.

 

We had to keep written lesson plans (although not to the same degree of detail) at the school at all times and occasionally these were viewed.

 

I think as a homeschooler my documentation doesn't have to be nearly as much as if I were teaching public school.

 

But if anyone ever checks my documentation, I can overwhelm them with paper and edu-speak :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have to submit anything but an attendance form, considerably less than a public school teacher has to submit for her students. I keep good records, for my sake as much as for anyone else's, but in Georgia, the system is far from oppressive -- if anything, it's quite freeing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I did my student teaching for my credential, I had to do 3 lesson plans for formal submission. They had to be typed, in a certain format, clearly state the objectives I would cover, describe how I would teach the topic (including examples), and describe how I'd assess student learning (including examples). For an hour-long class, it took me well over two hours to write the dratted plans up.

 

We had to keep written lesson plans (although not to the same degree of detail) at the school at all times and occasionally these were viewed.

 

I think as a homeschooler my documentation doesn't have to be nearly as much as if I were teaching public school.

 

But if anyone ever checks my documentation, I can overwhelm them with paper and edu-speak :D

 

Oh yes, I agree - the amount of paperwork my friends do is astronomical. What I mean is, although their *paperwork* is randomly checked, their day to day *instructing* is not.

 

One of my friends, who teaches in a science field, readily admits that the texts the district has approved for her to use won't prepare her students for what her stated mission is (AP level Biology and Chemistry). While they are technically AP texts, they are so poorly written (hello, written by committee) that they are essentially useless. She makes up her own materials.

 

My friend is very bright and passionate about the subject, and her kids love her. They are also succeeding at uni. I feel for kids who are stuck in a class with the lousy book w/o someone like her or with someone who is making bad materials.

 

 

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The idea of it bothers me, but my reality is that I live in an easy state as far as hs regs are concerned. The state school board bitterly opposes home schooling, and hs'ers are not allowed to participate in any clubs, activities, classes or sports, but we are allowed to register as private schools, which basically translates into no oversight at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But bigger than the oversight (which is its own thread) - what about the whole "prove junior has learned anything before we'll let him apply to college part? I guess that is what I'm really asking.

 

I can understand everyone doing applications, entry essays, even the blasted SATs - but why on earth does a college need to know what books a homeschool student used, but not a "regular" student?

 

 

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...