Jump to content

Menu

Please help me with this french exercise!


Kfamily
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is from FSF 1:

 

We are learning about the partitive de. This is our grammar lesson: (Lesson 17)

 

partitive de=part of a whole, some, any

Masc., sing.: du or de l'

Fem., sing. : de la or de l'

Masc. or Fem., plural: des

 

Here is the exercise:

 

Put the correct form of de in the following sentences:

 

1.Je viens des Etats-Unis.

2.Ellla a beaucoup de freres.

3.Je n'ai pas de soeurs.

4.J'ai des crayons.

5.Ensuite, nous prenons des cahiers.

6.J'ai de bons amis.

 

Note: I am missing a couple of accent marks in the above sentences...

I have filled it in with the answers but I having trouble understanding the singular answers. (The plural sentences I'm understanding.)

 

Sentence #2: Ella a beaucoup de freres. Why is this de rather than du or de l'?

 

I think Sentence #3 gets de because it is negative..? Is that right?

I think Sentence # 6 get de because it is an adjective modifying a noun...? Is that right? I really barely get this but I see an example in the Teacher's Ed. and I that is where I'm getting this.

 

I really wish we had more practice with this and more examples that included the forms used in the grammar section. As it stands, all the answers are either de or des and the other forms are not used in this exercise. I barely understand with 6 sentences and I know my dd (12) will not get this with 6 sentences....so again I will need to supplement. I can say that all this supplementing is making me better at this....:lol::D

 

I think I'm a little confused!:lol::001_huh:

 

Help please...we're stalling out again in our lessons with French since I can't teach what I don't understand myself.

Edited by Kfamily
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm personally quite rusty on the vocabulary of grammar so I'll try to help you directly from my French Grammar book.

 

This is from FSF 1:

 

We are learning about the partitive de. This is our grammar lesson: (Lesson 17)

 

partitive de=part of a whole, some, any

Masc., sing.: du or d l'

Fem., sing. : de la or de l'

Masc. or Fem., plural: des

 

Here is the exercise:

 

Put the correct form of de in the following sentences:

 

1.Je viens des Etats-Unis.

2.Ellla a beaucoup de freres.

3.Je n'ai pas de soeurs.

4.J'ai de bons amis.

5.Ensuite, nous prenons des cahiers.

6.J'ai de bons amis.

 

Note: I am missing a couple of accent marks in the above sentences...

I have filled it in with the answers but I having trouble understanding the singular answers. (The plural sentences I'm understanding.)

 

Sentence #2: Ella a beaucoup de freres. Why is this de rather than du or de l'?

After prepositional de, there is no plural indefinite (des) or partitive article (du, de la, de l').

After nouns and adverbs of quantity + de

 

e.g. Beaucoup de ... , peu de ... , une douzaine d'oeufs,

 

 

I think Sentence #3 gets de because it is negative..? Is that right?

 

The indefinite and partitive articles normally occur as de alone when the noun is the direct object in a negative clause. (This rule does not apply after etre, since etre does not take a direct object.)

 

e.g. Elle n'a pas de manteau.

 

I think Sentence # 6 get de because it is an adjective modifying a noun...? Is that right? I really barely get this but I see an example in the Teacher's Ed. and I that is where I'm getting this.

 

When a plural noun is preceded by an adjective, the indefinite article is de. This is true even when the noun is represented by en.

 

e.g. des conseils (advice) VERSUS de bons conseils (good advice)

 

There are exceptions but I would guess your book will tackle them gradually.

 

(I thought I'd let you know that #4 & #6 are the listed the same just in case you want to add to your thread.)

I really wish we had more practice with this and more examples that included the forms used in the grammar section. As it stands, all the answers are either de or des and the other forms are not used in this exercise. I barely understand with 6 sentences and I know my dd (12) will not get this with 6 sentences....so again I will need to supplement. I can say that all this supplementing is making me better at this....:lol::D

 

I think I'm a little confused!:lol::001_huh:

 

Help please...we're stalling out again in our lessons with French since I can't teach what I don't understand myself.

 

HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm personally quite rusty on the vocabulary of grammar so I'll try to help you directly from my French Grammar book.

 

I meant to agree with her answers in her quote of your original post!

 

HTH

:iagree:

 

Those are correct answers to your questions, but there are a few exceptions to the rules, of course! Why make anything simple??!!:tongue_smilie:

 

When opposing two nouns in the negative, you use the whole partitive article: Ne prenez pas de la tarte, prenez du gateau.

 

Also when you are referring to one single thing: Elle n'a pas dit un mot.

 

Nor after the verb etre: Ce n'est pas une bicyclette. C'est une voiture.

 

When using ni in a lilst of things, like: Elle n'aime ni pommes, ni potirons, ni courgettes.

 

I can't do accent marks easily, either, so I apologize for the missing marks.

Edited by thescrappyhomeschooler
fixing it
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...