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Reading aloud academic subjects like history and science - till what age/grade?


anewday
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For history, we're using Biblioplan with SOTW3...for science, we use the Jeannie Fullbright books (CM style science)...and I'm wondering, can I stop? :lol:

 

Seriously though, at what age or grade level do you think a child should transition from being read to? I'm a strong believer in continuing to read aloud as a family activity all types of books, but I'm starting to feel like my 6th grader in particular should be reading all her assigned academic work to herself. I love SOTW (and I love learning a lot alongside of them) but I'm getting a bit weary of how much the completion of their school days hinges on me basically taking their hand and leading them through these two subjects. If I don't pull the books down, read them, hand them their activity/color sheets, ask them narration questions etc etc etc....it won't get done.

 

I don't mind this with my 3rd grader really. I think I'm just trying to figure out if it's even good for my oldest anymore. Moving towards independence in her studies makes me think that mom no longer reading them to her needs to happen.....

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My 5th grader is being transitioned to doing all of his own reading for "school" this year. We'll always have a family read aloud/storytime going and I'm sure we'll share other things here and there, but as far as "school" goes, I plan to have him doing all of his own reading by 6th grade. He is a strong reader and loves to read. I decided to take a year to transition him because we have always used literature based curricula in the past and he is accustomed to being read to for up to 3 hours a day (spread out of course). He particularly enjoys listening to his history books being read aloud.

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I think it depends on the child. My 12-year-old does most of her schoolwork by herself, and does it very well. However, she has ADD and rushes through her reading. She reads so fast that she misses some of the big picture concepts, as well as some of the details. We have to do literature reading together. I often do history reading also, because I want her to savor the material and not fly through it as fast as she can.

 

It sounds as though I'm indulging her (reading to a 12-year-old), but she hates it. I do it because she simply has to be slowed down.

 

P.S. I want to add: She gets *most* of the big picture and *most* of the details, enough to pass a test, but still not enough to really get to the heart of the material. She doesn't ponder over it, and wonder what's going to happen next, and why. I want to teach her that there's more to what she's reading than what's on the surface. I want her to be a thinker and not someone who just rips through material as fast as she can so she can go on to the next thing (which is her tendency).

Edited by Rebecca VA
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STILL reading history aloud together with our 10th and 11th grade boys and loving it! Why? Well, it gives us the incredible opportunity to discuss, make connections, fast-forward to modern day connections and examples (current events!) etc. For similar reasons, also still doing our Great Books literature aloud together too. However, for science, older DS decided to tackle Chemistry on his own this year, while younger DS (with LDs), who is doing Biology, still "gets it" better if it's read aloud.

 

The big bonus of reading aloud: *I* am learning everything, too, right alongside of them! ;) Enjoy your homeschooling journey together! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
corrected error
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Like Lori, we will probably be reading together into high school. For one thing, I want to learn this stuff too! For another, I think we're more likely to have good discussions on the material if we read it together. Maybe at some age I'll have dds read it aloud to ME! I think you do want some independence in regards to work habits, curiosity, etc., but you don't necessarily want to turn them loose to learn in a vacuum. That discussion of ideas is important.

 

We use Biblioplan too. I do have my 9 yo reading the 3+ readers on her own now--I used to read those aloud. If you're not already doing that, you could have your 11 yo reading the 5+ readers. You could still plan on doing the family read-aloud to everyone--that's what it is intended for. Then make some decision on the classtime reading. Maybe there is a spine she can do on her own while you read a different one aloud to your 8 yo.

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I read aloud into high school as well. In fact we take turns reading out loud to each other. Right now we are in the middle of the Iliad! However, there are lots of things they also read independently as well. So it is a mix of both. But I love reading aloud with and for my teens.

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Thanks for all your thoughts on this!

 

Yes, the opportunities for discussion from reading together are great! Though much will depend on how I choose to do our next history cycle. My oldest will likely do 8th to 11th, which would be grades 5th to 8th and 1st to 4th for my youngest. Having ALL of them together for that round (and unless I use TOG which isn't gonna happen :tongue_smilie:) is such a big age spread...

 

For Biblioplan, yes, my oldest reads the literature herself (and my 3rd grader reads the K2+ books herself). I read from the spines and dh reads the literature for family read alouds....

 

Thanks again!

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I still read aloud those subjects to my ds. He has mild dyslexia and even though he is almost to grade level in reading he is a slow reader. He also has a much higher comprehension than reading level.

 

I plan on continuing at least with the science as necessary and hoping to transition to his own history in the next year or two. I supplement with some living books & non-fiction at his reading level that he does on his own. But for the main text we do the work as a read-aloud. He enjoys me reading to me and we plan to continue it in some form throughout his education.

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The big bonus of reading aloud: *I* am learning everything, too, right alongside of them! ;) Enjoy your homeschooling journey together! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

We are still doing most of our reading together. And, for the above reasons. I don't want my boys to just read and forget. I'm homeschooling so we can discuss, discuss, and learn together.

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I haven't read all the other responses so sorry if I double up.

 

My 14, 13 and 11 year olds now do all history and science readings independently. My 11yo was still reading with me at the start of the year but she asked to go on by herself, so I obliged :) .

 

My 9yo still reads history with me (we share read, kind of like a training ground for reading own history ;) ) and she does science independently.

 

I read aloud history to my 7yo, but even she 'share reads' science with me.

 

However, we still get together and discuss/narrate what is read. And we also have other literature read-alouds on the go because it's so good and we love it. :001_smile:

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We still read aloud math, science, and literature. And we ought to read history aloud. It lets us all discuss things, lets me make connections, lets me make sure they are understanding, and makes it all more fun. For us, high school wasn't the time to stop. I thought perhaps my independent youngest would want to do more on his own, but I heard him explaining why homeschooling highschool had failed with a friend and he said the main reason was that they didn't read things together, so obviously we need to keep to doing it. I think it varies by family and child, though.

-nan

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assignments themselves. Independently reading and responding to a text is a major skill that needs to be developed. I do hold them accountable for their reading, frequently reading their assignments as well, and then discussing with them. While it's nice to share read alouds, I also think it can become a crutch for the student. We do share read alouds in the evenings and audio books in the car, this we do just for enjoyment.

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Independently reading and responding to a text is a major skill that needs to be developed. I do hold them accountable for their reading, frequently reading their assignments as well, and then discussing with them.

 

My oldest is TOO dependent on me and I've been trying to steer and direct her more and more away from that (not the other extreme, but trying to find a healthy balance for her age and what we are comfortable with). I can see the reading aloud through high school being great for some kids, but with her, I'm not sure. I'd still want to continue other read alouds (biographies, good fiction, historical accounts, missionary/church history etc).

 

Like others who have commented, I'd want to continue to plan discussions with her on what she reads - and that would mean I'd need to be keeping up with it by reading some of it on my own. :)

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STILL reading history aloud together with our 10th and 11th grade boys and loving it! Why? Well, it gives us the incredible opportunity to discuss, make connections, fast-forward to modern day connections and examples (current events!) etc. For similar reasons, also still doing our Great Books literature aloud together too. However, for science, older DS decided to tackle Chemistry on his own this year, while younger DS (with LDs), who is doing Biology, still "gets it" better if it's read aloud.

 

The big bonus of reading aloud: *I* am learning everything, too, right alongside of them! ;) Enjoy your homeschooling journey together! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

:iagree:

 

I have 6th and 9th grade boys, and so this year they aren't doing *anything* together in history or science. I don't have time to read *everything* to them. But, I do read the "stretcher" stuff to them. The material that they could read, but not fully digest with us stopping to discuss and make connections, etc (as Lori pointed out). Just yesterday, I read through a portion of Western Civilization with my 9th grader, showing him how to mark up his book so he can easily go back and find the thesis, and the supporting facts.

 

Also, I find it's hard to find the time to "just discuss" once they've read something on their own. Maybe I read it two or three months ago, and I'm fuzzy on it, and even if I made notes the discussions just aren't as powerful as when we've both just read it.

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