Jump to content

Menu

Pointers on starting my WEM journey


Recommended Posts

So, I've read WEM for the third time and started my third notebook. :001_huh: I'm ready to go ahead and start in on the actual reading now. :tongue_smilie: To be fair, I had put it off in the past because each time, I had friends who were going to make the journey with me but never even got as far as putting WEM on hold at the library. :glare: I seemed to let myself get hung up on the reading buddy aspect of it and used that as my excuse to delay my journey.

 

Wondering if any of you who've BTDT have any pointers for me? Any sections to start in on that are better than the others? I'm having a tough time deciding whether I want to start in on the novels or the poems since there's aspects of each that REALLY appeal to me and bits of both that don't interest me at all. Any tips on which would be the best section to get started with?:bigear:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Alte Veste Academy

:bigear:

 

I'm going to be starting in early November. I'm also buying LOF and Latin for me to work through.

 

The idea of a buddy is nice, good for accountabilty. I wonder if there could be a weekly thread like for Book a Week or Wordless Wednesday blog entries. I'm not volunteering or anything...just interested. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:bigear:

 

I'm going to be starting in early November. I'm also buying LOF and Latin for me to work through.

 

The idea of a buddy is nice, good for accountabilty. I wonder if there could be a weekly thread like for Book a Week or Wordless Wednesday blog entries. I'm not volunteering or anything...just interested. :D

 

Hey! That's what I'm doing too! LoF and a Latin program, but I can't decide which one. :confused:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been reading through the novels for the couple of years. I started with novels because fiction is what I like best and was most interested in. I'd choose whichever genre appeals to you most, that will make it more likely you'll stick with it and enjoy it.

 

My first pointer would be to give each book a chance and not to assume it will be too hard or you won't like it. There were several books I was sure I wouldn't enjoy and only read because they were next on the list and then I really ended up loving. Don Quixote was one of them for me. The best part of reading through these books for me has been just that, discovering books I really loved but probably wouldn't have picked up and tried.

 

My second piece of advice would be that if you find a book that you give a try but really hate to let yourself move on. I should have done that with Moby Dick. I think SWB mentions in WEM that there are certain books that she can't get through either. Moby Dick took me forever because I just hated it. Looking back I didn't get much out of it and only read it to check off the list...not really the point of doing this. So give each book a chance and don't give up easily but if you find one that is just killing the whole thing for you then move on.

 

Lastly, my advice would be to not feel bad if you don't take notes or follow the guidelines in WEM. I did for Don Quixote and I plan to take notes for War and Peace which is next up for me. But by the second book the note taking began to feel like a chore to me and made me read less. I felt like at this stage of my life it was more important to me to read the books, even if it is just at a "grammar" level than to read each one that carefully. I'd figure out for you what your goal is in reading and then make it work for you.

Edited by Alice
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've started with TWEM studies too. I put all the books in chronological order and started from the Ancients. I've read some interesting books that weren't on the TWEM list but were on other similar lists (and I've gone off on different rabbit runs too).

 

I think the important thing is that you read. The questioning of the book and the discussion with others is important, but its the reading that puts you ahead of most people around you (by the way, I loved Plato's 'Republic' and I've started 'Don Quixote' but have postponed it to next year when I'll be in my middle ages period (trying to do the 4 year cycle of ages)).

 

I'm still torn between doing Life of Fred or an Open University course. I'm also wanting to do an arts course in drawing and another in art history (to link in with my study of world history).

 

You're not alone and I'd love to share my thoughts with others so if a weekly thread does start that would be great.

 

Start reading!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started with novels and it was a bit daunting, because it was Don Quixote. It took me a looong time to get thorugh it(with several stops and starts) Try the poems.

 

This was my experience as well. I read somewhere that even C.S. Lewis wrote "never again" in the back of the book when he finished Don Quixote.:001_smile:

 

I am working on the novels and have been working through Wheelock's Latin and am keeping ahead of my son in Algebra 2 and Chemistry. I do this every time I have a high schooler as a review. I would like to go through a Logic program this year as well, but haven't started. That's something I've never done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Alte Veste Academy
Hey! That's what I'm doing too! LoF and a Latin program, but I can't decide which one. :confused:

 

Me either! I go back and forth between thinking I should just buy what I'm going to use with the kids and do it first and buying a high school program to work through. I took Latin in high school but retained zero. Maybe a grammar stage text would suit me better...paired with a true desire to learn, of course.

 

Which LOF? Are you beginning with Fractions or higher? I want to do this as well.

 

I'm starting at the very beginning. Apparently, I don't remember a thing I supposedly learned in public school (despite being a good tester, I did not get math). I got through Pre-Calc. in high school and do not remember a thing. As a Social Work major, I didn't have to take any serious math in college, so I'm going to wade into the deep end slowly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm mostly doing TWEM with my sons, so we're doing it a little differently, but I suggest:

 

Go ahead and start with DonQuixote (if you like novels well enough to start with them), but get the tapes from the library. The story is fun, but the book is long. Tapes allow busy people to do two things at once, like read and sort laundry or do dishes, or read and drive children hither and yon.

 

Write in the books, if you can afford to buy them. That way, you can read while you are waiting at the orthodontist without carrying around too many things and juggling them on your lap. Besides, when you reread years later, it is fun to read them. Keeping notes is good, too, but writing in the book is often more practical.

 

The versions of the books we've gotten usually have a rather large introduction. We read the historical context part of the intro first, then the part about the translation, then read the book, and then (if we feel like it) read the rest of the introduction. Often, the historical part of the intro is the only historical context I get. I don't have the time or interest to read Spielvogel and I had very little history in school. The intro does all the work for me. (I'm slowly reading my way through the Cartoon History of the World, but that is about all the history I am likely to read GRIN.) The rest of the intro often gives away the plot of the book, and we happen to like not knowing what is going to happen next.

 

You wouldn't believe how much translations vary. Try to go to a library or bookstore and read the different translations before buying the book. Which translation can make or break a book for me.

 

Remember that you haven't really failed at this project until you actually say "I failed" and quit. Just because life happens and you stop reading for a few months or years doesn't mean you have failed. Pick up and start again. If you make sure you use a good bookmark and keep some sort of summaries of chapters and characters, and you should be able to pause as many times as you need to over the course of your lifetime.

 

If you get stalled or bored, try doing a Shakespeare play or a poem. You will accomplish something valuable while you are procrastinating.

 

HTH

-Nan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, my advice is to keep going. I read through all the books in the novel and the autobiographies section and I felt a HUGE sense of accomplishment. There were books I loved and books that I found boring. But, I ploughed through them ALL. But, even the ones that I found difficult, I was glad to have read them once I was done. I'm working on the histories now.

 

By the way, I'm working through Latin Prep with my kids. We are on level 2. I think it is really fun-and my kids enjoy doing it with me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...