Jump to content

Menu

Why did you decide to homeschool?


Recommended Posts

I just had a heated debate with my MIL about my wanting to homeschool my daughters instead of putting them in public school and I just would like to know....why did you decide to homeschool over the public school system? I'm especially interested in hearing from those who have reasons other than religious. Don't get me wrong.....I am religious and a HUGE part of my rejection of public school is religious and the teaching of evolution, etc. but that doesn't matter to my MIL much. I'd love to hear a different argument for homeschooling.....one of superior academics.

 

Her main thing is that I'm not certified and therefore am not qualified to educate my children. She also wanted to know the top reasons why parents prefer homeschooling over the traditional public school system. So I thought what better place to ask then here! Thanks for your help. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We believe that we can do a better job with both the academics and the socializing.

 

ETA: My original decision to hs came at university. I knew far too many honors students from high school who were in remedial classes. I vowed that I would do better by my children than the schools had by those.

Edited by rockermom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first reason was academics. I had a 3yo who was already doing about a 4th grade level. However, my daughter's birthday was late so she had a full 3 years left til she could attend public school. We moved and that situation changed but by then I was already hooked on homeschooling :) It's a good thing also. My other child was on the other end of the spectrum so homeschooling has been best for him academically also :)

 

My hubby's first reason was social though. Though he didn't know how our kids would be socialized (until I researched and told him), he *knew* public school was not the place he wanted them socialized. I agreed with that though our school situations were considerably different. He was popular; I was not.

 

In time, we added all sorts of reasons. Basically, in time, we realized that homeschooling was best for our children academically, socially, spiritually, mentally, emotionally, physically, and family wise. I am so glad we chose homeschooling.

 

:::whispering::: I am a little jealous of all the opportunities they get though. I would have enjoyed living life the way they've gotten to :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I knew we could do a ten times better job then any school in our area and we want our children to have the best possible education in life!!! There are so many "reasons" that it would actually take me quite a long time to write out LOL My parents didn't quite understand at first but when I gave them research links and evidence it quickly won them over to the point where they now are HSing advocates and brag to everyone about our intent to HS :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was educated to teach children (I have a degree in Elem. Educ. from Auburn Univ.) and I can say without reservation that my preparation did very little to prepare me for educating children...especially my own. I would say my best teacher preparation comes from the very thing that I hope to pass on to them. A huge desire to understand what really makes one educated and learning the methods (however unconventional) to achieve it.

 

Hope that helps a little...:001_smile: It is not the degree or the training that makes some of world's best teachers as wonderful as they are. I think some of the best ones are right here on this board!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is your dh on board? If he is, say so, and chances are she will change her tune or take it up with him.

 

We homeschool mainly for academic reasons...our school system is HORRIBLE! They do not teach children how to read until 1st grade (just ABCs in K). I guess that's not bad in and of itself but when my 3yo is already reading fluently, it makes me wonder what would happen when she is 5 and goes into K...I was told by a teacher that she would help around the classroom...all well and good but I do not send my children to school to be helpers, but to learn!

 

Okay, enough ranting...Think of it logically...why do you think school systems push for smaller class sizes? Because you learn better when there is more one-on-one teaching. Hello homeschool! Many of my friends homeschool their children (varying ranges of intelligence) and ALL of them are ahead of where they would be in the public schools. Why hold our children back just because that is what everyone else is doing?!?!

 

As far as socializing, I was a school teacher before I started having kids and I did NOT want socializing going on in my classroom...leave that for AFTER school - so that is a bogus argument to me. I am looking into 4H, county sports, gymnastics, etc. for my children to learn how to get along with peers and other teachers. We go to a small church so they get *some* of that there too.

 

lots of luck...just know, some people will never be *convinced* because they don't want to be...they have their mind made up already...:tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My reason is kind of religious in the sense that I knew that I had to homeschool my children. I had a feeling that if I didn't homeschool that my children's lives would be messed up. Now, I took that feeling as God telling me what to do.

 

That was 7 years ago. In the past two years, I have discovered why I had that oh-so-strong feeling. All of my children are dyslexic and my youngest also has sensory issues. If they were in school, I know that it would have taken longer to figure out the problems as I wouldn't have been so knowledgable about education. I wouldn't have had a clue as to how to figure out what their issues were.

 

As a result of being on this board and others like it, I was able to figure things out on my own. I am also able to figure out the solutions. I have become very good at research. I know that if I wasn't hsing, I would have depended on the school system to figure things out and I know that would have been a slow journey.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, my kids were in public school until this year. They are now 4th and 6th grades. The school was teaching to the lowest in the class and couldn't care less about those who needed more. When I decided to homeschool, I notified the schools and got a call from the elementary school. The princpal told me that they "Want as many kids in the school as possible, especially those of her caliber". That told me that he is only worried about the money and the TAKS (Texas standardized test) scores (which I already knew). When I had complained before about her needs not being met, he told me, "Unfortunately we are better at some things than we are at others." They don't care if they are meeting the needs of the kids. They teach to the test and only want them present so they can get paid. He had his chance, and chose not to address my concerns. It's bad when the teachers are very supportive of me homeschooling. You don't normally see that.:tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate the curriculum used where I live: Everyday Math, Whole Language, American History ONLY from k-5, writing for the sake of writing (no copy work).

 

I don't want my dc to have to deal with behavior problems in school (the way other dc behave) and I don't want my dc to be the behavior problem (my k'er is very hyper).

 

School days are too long for young dc and I don't believe in homework. I believe after school is time for extra curricular activities and family time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll try to keep my answer short. :001_smile:

 

My dd8 was bored in ps (she went to ps for K & 1st). She learns very quickly & was excelling in everything...she now works at her pace & is able to work ahead to stay challenged.

 

My ds6 is the complete opposite of dd8. He wasn't interested in learing to read AT ALL last year. We tried to stuggle through it. He's just now starting to want to learn to read & it's finally paying off! I KNOW he would have been cast aside at ps...& probably help back in Kindergarten another year even though his math skills are fine. So he would have been bored with math, but still struggling with reading. By homeschooling we are at his level in both...keeping him challenged but not frustrated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was bored throughout school, & when I was curious about things, there was no time to pursue those interests, mainly because of busywork.

 

The whole mentality of school made me crazy. In 2nd g, I lost points on a hw assignment because I did it in class. Because there was nothing. else. to. do.

 

Every yr, we learned the same things in grammar. Multiplication was fun in 2nd g, but they wouldn't let us learn anything beyond 5x5. In 3rd g, it wasn't fun any more.

 

I learn math faster than "average" but slower than "advanced." Maybe "different" is a better word for it, but I was convinced I was not good at math, despite the fact that I was about 3yrs ahead of my agemates. I compared myself to the top of whatever class level I was placed in.

 

There are too many holes in the ps system. I fell through. I graduated when I was 15, w/out honors or scholarships, because my counselor didn't know what she was doing & neither of my parents had been to college. I have huge college debt now & 2 practically worthless degrees. This paragraph doesn't necessarily have anything to do w/ hs'ing, though.

 

My mom hs'd me when I was 4. The ps sys scared her out of it when I turned 5, but she at least convinced them to put me in 1st g. The rest of the time I was in school, I was begging her to take me out. I was bored. And most of all, I was determined to hs my kids some day, to make up for everything I was missing.

 

Now? There are days when I want to send my kids to the other room so I can do their projects w/out interruption. :lol: On the rough days when I think of quitting? If my dh would just call my bluff, I'd be in serious trouble. (Not that I mean to bluff, lol, but you know how those days are.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, Jennifer!

 

My experience with MILs .....and I have had 2....is do not under any circumstances argue with them. :lol: There will be no winners.

 

Seriously, Jenn, these are your kids and you get to decide how to educate them. You do not need her approval or need to explain your reasons to her. Her choices are to get on board and help you out or be the grumpy grandma that nobody wants to visit. She got to make the decisions that she felt were best for her kids and you get to do the same for yours!

 

My initial MIL was the grumpy variety. Which is funny because she was the one who approached me about hsing when C. was 1yo and I wasn't interested. Her beef was that I didn't do it the way she thought I should. My response, "These are my kids and I get to decide." THe saddest part about being the "grumpy" grandma is that the kids eventually got tired of listening to it and don't have as much to do with her. That is sad.

 

My current MIL is the Get On Board Grandma. SHe did have the benefit of watching C/H reactions to the Grumpy Grandma when she called and quized them about this and that. The kids got tired of it. MY CMIL realized that she doesn't want to push the KIDS away and I'm really going to do what I think best. So she got on board and helps us out.

 

In your circumstance I would turn her questions around. Show me the proof that certified teachers are better and the ps have higher academic standards. The proof isn't there and she won't find it. SHe isn't going to bother looking for it either because this is really just a power play. A power play she has no business engaging in or winning!

 

Ideally your DH should be taking your side and gently putting his mama back in the place of loving, supportive grandma!

 

Best of luck, mama!

Edited by Wendy B.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We started out in ps and I hated the curriculum: Investigations and Everyday Math, terrible reading instruction, lots of creative writing but no actual writing instruction, social studies (not history), and on and on. The sign on the first grade teacher's door proclaiming "Mrs. H's students are proud to be drug free!" didn't help.

 

We hs'd for 5 years, and my kids are now back in ps. My 9th grader is bored, but loves the social life and wants to continue. My 7th grader is getting seriously fed up with the lack of content and is thinking about coming back home. :thumbup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We started bc the school couldn't meet my son's academic needs--but since have found ourselves homeschooling for social/religious reasons too. I think a persuasive argument is that you probably couldn't do worse than the current public school system-certified teacher or not. She may not be aware of the current state of public education. MIL's also wonder if you're thinking they failed their own kids by sending them to public school--since you don't seem to approve of it now. I think MIL's can get particularly difficult bc they often look at it as a judgement of their own schooling choices. She needs to know she isn't comparing apples to apples so she can stop taking it personally--and she may be open to hearing you out.

 

I'd also advise that if she doesn't become receptive, you should just leave her out of the conversation. Do what you and your spouse want, and when you're with her talk about other subjects (hard for us homeschool moms) if she isn't on board it is easiest just to keep her out of it--at least for a while. Took mine 6 years to warm up-about the time other 'tweens' she knew were hitting the attitude phase, and she finally saw the difference in ours. Good test scores never hurt either--

 

I'd show her this--and then back off from the discussion for a while. Sometimes they just need time to let in sink in.

 

http://www.hslda.org/docs/study/ray2009/default.asp

Surveying 11,739 homeschooling students and their families from all 50 states through 15 independent testing services, Homeschool Progress Report 2009: Academic Achievement and Demographics is the most comprehensive study of homeschool academic achievement to date. The results support the large existing body of research on homeschool academic achievement and show homeschoolers, on average, scoring 37 percentile points above public school students on standardized achievement tests. The study also found that the achievement gaps common to public schools were practically insignificant in the homeschool community. Conducted by Dr. Brian Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute.

Edited by homeschoolally
added comment
Link to comment
Share on other sites

W/ regard to the "certified teacher" argument--there are statistics that show how much time a kid spends between k & 12 under "certified teachers"--depending on where you are, it's not as much as they'd like you to think. Between alt cert & subs, it's hit or miss.

 

In the highschool where I taught, the head of our grade level had a degree in theater, not English. She'd done alternative cert a couple of yrs earlier, & that was it for ed courses. When they told us we had to start assigning 1 academic essay every 6 weeks, she turned to me & asked, "What's an academic essay?"

 

*She* counts as *certified,* since she's met the requirements of alt cert. On paper, I have an upper level degree (BA in Lit, MEdT) & no experience, she has a BA & 5 yrs' teaching. (Because my experience was PT, it doesn't count.) Any admin would hire her over me in a heartbeat, despite the fact that I've been teaching "pt" for nearly 15 yrs.

 

"Certified" doesn't always mean much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dd developed epilepsy & my parish school couldn't handle it.

 

I started homeschooling and it felt like what was meant to be for our family.

 

The plan now is to homeschool dd thru high school, have my first son finish at his all boys Catholic school & send my 2nd there, too.

 

I don't know if I'd ever come to the point where my children would go to public school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I could probably answer much shorter for "why would you want to send them to public school" LOL. There are just SO many reasons why we chose to homeschool.

 

The top of is, of course, a religious reason. I want my kids foundation to be Jesus Christ. Education is very important, but living for Jesus is even more important. Public school certainly will not teach my child that. But I will not elaborate here because you want non-religious reasons.

 

The other reasons fall in no particular order behind that one....

 

I feel I can educate my children better. Who better to educate them than the person who has their very best interest at heart? Teachers may like them, maybe even love them at times, but will not love them like their parents.

 

I can cater to my kids likes/dislikes/abilities/weaknesses. Public school cannot do this. If a kid doesn't understand a point being made, they have to move on. And vice versa. If my kid likes dinosaurs, I can center much of our learning around dinosaurs. If my kid is behind in math, I can spend more time on that area. If my kid adores animal science, I focus on science on that.

 

I do not want my kids socialization to be in the public school. Yes, I want my kids sheltered. I dont care if some people have a negative connotation about that. My five year old does not need to know about oral sex, nor talk about having crushes on boys.

 

I actually like my kids and like spending time with them.

 

I want to raise them, not give them over to the government, who I'm not sure that I really trust.

 

I do not want "dumbed down" curriculum for my kids. I also do not want them taught some of the things that conflict with our Christian beliefs.

 

Though it might be rare, I dont want my kids exposed to the dangers you hear about in schools. Bullying, sexual abuse, crazy teachers, kids bringing guns, etc.

 

In school there is so much wasted time. Between lining up, behavior problems, bathroom breaks, walking the entire class around the school, passing out supplies to a whole group of kids, settling them down, questions asked by multiple children, etc.....well, I can get so much more done in a shorter amount of time.

 

That's all I can think of right now.....I'm constantly adding to my list though. ;)

Edited by ChristusG
adding something
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's wonderful for you to get ideas from other people as to why they're homeschooling. It's probably also expedient to borrow one of these arguments and present it to your MIL to calm her fears.

 

That being said, you have to homeschool your kids for your very own reasons, and when your MIL asks you why you're doing that, presenting arguments will never be the end of it. She will always find something to challenge.

 

Instead, when she asks you why you're homeschooling, gently and respectfully tell her you are doing so because you are their mother and that is the decision you have made. When you get into trying to justify your decision, you will never convince her. The more you justify, the more she will challenge.

 

I'm all for helping others come to terms with my decisions, but I allow no challenges. I'm doing it because it's what I decided. End of story.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decided to homeschool because I like hanging out with my kids.

 

We have a non-traditional living arrangement, and homeschooling maximizes our time together as a family. Religious, social, and academic reasons combined contributed at most 1% to my ultimate decision.

 

I have very garden-variety kids who would do fine academically at public or private school. We're very active in the community, so they are still socializing with the same kids as they would otherwise go to school with. Our religion is a minority one where we live, but we have faith-based schools in the area that are available and affordable. I just like hanging out with my family, including the school-aged kids :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids attend the Number Two school district in our state - excellent facilities. However, something's wrong when 6 yro can't read three letter words and 7 yro can't add. :glare: Some of the teachers were just downright mean.

 

After talking to parents with middle schoolers, I found out that THEIR kids can't do simple math, either.

 

For 2 parents with 12 years of college between the two of us, we were concerned that our kids would not reach their potential, academically. Oh yeah, and the other kids - like the boy on the school bus who was trying to get my daughter to touch his you know what concerned me a little too. :glare:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We yanked Diva mid grade 3. She was being bullied by both students and her teacher.

 

Once I had her home, I gradually realized that this kid was capable of so much more than her report cards ever showed. My girl 'hated' math...turns out she was so far ahead of the game that she was bored out of her mind. I've since come to realize that's pretty much across the board with her. Being able to meet her where her skills are at, challenge her, and move on once she's grasped the concept (she's one of those kids that doesn't need repetition, or very little at most to grasp a concept), hand her literature that makes her eyes light up...Makes the bad days so worth the urge to put my head through a brick wall. Repeatedly. :lol:

 

Now I have Tazzie and Princess (4 and 3). They will NEVER set foot inside a public school as long as I get a vote and am able to home educate.

 

It is a religious issue for us too, but bullying was the reason we started when we did.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I chose homeschool primarily for academic and behavioral reasons. Ariel doesn't fit nicely in a grade level "box." She would be one of the youngest in her class (she would be in K if in PS), but in comparing her to other kids, she operates more on a late-1st grade level. She would be bored out of her mind in public school and probably constantly in trouble for talking. I don't want her to spend 6 hours a day at school and then have to do homework, just to keep busy. I like having the freedom to do what we want, when we want without having to worry about X project due tomorrow or studying for Y test on Friday. Plus, schools here are really, really big on "teaching to the test." :glare: That's not education, in my book. I also don't want Ariel acting like the PS kids. She has friends in PS and at only 5-7 years old, act like little snots. I like my happy, fun loving, snuggly child. I don't want that crushed out of her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had several reasons. The biggest was the stress PS was causing my dd9. She is extremely bright but doesnt quite fit the mold of "the perfect child". She was falling behind, even with hours of homework. She was crying everyday because of the social structures she had to deal with. We also were not happy with alot of elements our girls were being exposed to. I began to understand that I as their mother, could do a better job than a stranger at teaching our girls. With all the choices in curriculum anyone who is motivated can teach their children and do a better job than PS. It has by far been the best decision we have ever made.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We felt that being in age-segregated classrooms for 13 years was an artificial environment. We wanted our children to feel comfortable around people of all ages. Academics plays some part in it. Dh would like the children to be academically advanced but the children don't seem to care about that at all. Our school district is a "good" one but it isn't great. Maybe if we could afford a "great" school we would send them there.

 

Older dd has no interest in ps. She likes working independently and getting her work for the day done early. Younger dd would like to go for social reasons only. I suspect we would be having discussions with her teachers if she ever does go to school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both of my sons were in public school until a couple of years ago. I pulled the younger one out for 6th grade because he is dyslexic and the school did not know how to teach him plus the 6th grade teachers had a reputation for being bullies--they yelled at the kids that didn't understand concepts as quickly as others and they piled on hours and hours of homework with the explanation that they were getting them ready for jr. high school.

 

My older son was having absolutely no problem in school but he wanted more time to do the things that HE wanted to do--work on his tractors and trucks. School was taking up too much of his life (according to him). He learns easily so I had no qualms about teaching him at home.

 

My MIL, I'm sure, was not on board but she really didn't say too much outright. I have a SIL who is a teacher and she would never dream of keeping her kids out of school so I never felt that I had her approval (I am not a teacher by trade). I did not ask for their approval so it did not matter to me. I don't think all public schools are evil--I just don't think they are the ideal place for everyone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Coz I'm on a power trip :lol:

 

Seriously, though. If my kids go to school, I have the responsibility to make sure they are educated and relatively happy, but little power to make sure that happens. If I teach them myself, I have both the responsibility and the power to make changes when necessary.

 

Rosie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure what part of TX you're in, but I'm in TX too...central TX to be more specific.

 

I decided to homeschool because I was a teacher before the kids were born and I saw enough of how kids who aren't average (either above or below) are treated. Kids who need special help are passed over or shuffled out of the classroom (where they still weren't helped). Kids who need to be challenged aren't. They are "teacher's helpers" and "aides" and are expected to help out other kids in their class or lose their high grades.

 

Meanwhile, no one is really LEARNING anything. There is so much teaching to the TAKS going on that all the kids learn is how to bubble in scantrons. My last year teaching (03-04), some friends and I sat down after the last day of school and counted out the days we'd lost to testing. It was over 70 days that we didn't get to teach because we were giving benchmarks, or practice TAKS tests. That doesn't even count classroom testing or 6-weeks tests.

 

And the state tests have become a joke. To get a 70% on the history test, you don't have to answer 70% correct. You don't even have to answer 50% of them correct. The science test isn't much better. And the writing portion (which was supposed to have improved when we switched to the TAKS and gotten away from the fomula) is nothing but a slightly different formula. Follow it and you'll get a 5. Don't and you won't.

 

From my friends who are still in public education, I hear that things are even more dismal now with NCLB because the schools are that much more desperate to earn their funds. And the only way they know how to prepare the kids for the test is to test the heck out of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both of my girls were bullied at school. The older one was bullied by her follow students and her teacher. The students called her stupid in math. The teacher sad that this was not happenning. If it was, she would hear it it. I was called mean, after I said, "You know. Children do whisper.":001_huh:

 

The teacher pulled books out of her hand while stating they were too hard for her to read. After six weeks in 1st grade, she informed me that she was dump and that she was unable to learn.:sad:

 

I taught her math and reading at home. The teacher asked me to ask dd11 not to speak of how far along she was in her math. It seems the 3 little monsters.....oops sorry, I meant to type the 3 little boys that said she was stupid in math were now behind her in math. They would get upset and cry when dd11 would anounce that she completed another math packet.

 

I told the teacher, "No, I would not tell her to keep her achievements to herself."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about pointing out that it's one year at a time, until you feel that you're not as smart as the grade you're suppose to be teaching? No worries MIL, I'm not committed forever, lets see what the scope and sequence is for kindergarten... yup... looks like I can handle numbers and letters... I'll look again next year to make sure I can teach first...

And, Brian Ray's site is great about how children test in homeschooling and such...

Carrie:-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The thing that I really found amusing...you could teach children in school, public and private, without being a teacher. Our local elementary schools now have Kindergarten class "taught" by a parapro (paying just a little more than minimum wage) for part of the time the students are there. :lol:

 

I am of the belief that anyone knowledgable, or willing to become knowledgable can teach but hey, if they can do it, so can I. :D

 

My children were not being adequately challenged in the PS system and that wasn't going to change any time soon. Now my children work at their pace at whatever level they are ready for in each subject, and are individuals rather than a "class". The PS isn't going to teach grade levels ahead in some subjects and on level in others. That is what my DC need, so that is what we do. The other nice benefit. I know what they are learning. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our primary reason was, and continues to be, academics. It's my pat answer: "We homeschool for academic excellence."

 

Dh & I both went to highly-regarded private schools. We received excellent educations. However, we both encountered lots of times that we were bored... and we had years stretch by without challenge. It's very difficult to remember what to do when you haven't been truly challenged in years. I wanted to avoid that with my children. If my fourth grader were coasting through her schoolwork in 2 hours and getting every answer correct, I'd be doing it wrong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My First response to my MIl and Mom and well the entire rest of the family was "You made the decisions for your kids, I make them for mine and when I need your input I will ask for it. Until then, my choice concerning my kids isn't up for discussion."

 

My reasons were after an interview with the school :

1) academically he would have to do whatever anyone else was doing regardless of whether he was below or above.

 

2) the school looked like a prison and the kids had to walk in line with their hands behind their backs like prisoners. I didn't want my child accustomed to shuffling along in a line with his hands behind him.

 

3)Those certified teachers were old friends of mine that were idiots in school back then. Seriously, 12th grade English and you still can't write a paper or do simple math but you somehow can pass teacher college and get to teach kids?? Plus, the certified math teacher was teaching English and a lot of teachers were not teaching in their certification but where ever they were needed.

 

4) Those certified teachers were not necessarily in class. The kindergarten class ( I saw four of them) had two permanent subs and one temp. THe teachers were out on sick leave or maternity and would be back the next year. Our sub requirements were a GED or high school diploma. And that didn't change even for high school. Lesson plans for one entire year in an AP chemistry class at the high school (I checked them out too!) was taught by a sub with a high school diploma. I could certainly follow a lesson plan.

 

5) 2 weeks every spring, they tested for 2 hours every morning and then did not a single thing the reminder of the day (to give the kids a break and so they would be rested for the test) and the week before was practice test taking week. 15 full days spent on ONE test! One birthday party every month (1/2 day), 1 week of half days at the end of school, Fall party, winter party, Valentine's party, 100 days party, spring fling, May day and end of the year party. And the kicker was the kids couldn't leave their seats unless directed or socialize with other kids. They said the parties were only for a couple of hours while the kids sat at their desk and had the party stuff handed out and did the party. I felt I could do better parties.

 

6) If he was sick and home bound, he would get one hour per week with a home bound teacher. She would check his stuff and hand out the next week's work. That for the elementary years equaled the amount of teaching in the class room. For high school, it was 4 hours per week.:confused:

 

After interviewing the school at all levels, it just seemed like a no-brainer. They wouldn't meet him where he was academically, they wouldn't let him socialize during socialization activities and they couldn't guarantee an educated teacher with more education than my hubby and I had.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as having a teaching degree, I asked that same question on these boards to all the people with teaching degrees. Read this thread to see what they said. (that you don't need them.)

 

And here's a thread I wrote explaining why I think that the academics are superior using one-on-one tutoring (aka homeschooling) as opposed to teaching exclusively in a group setting (public/private school.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

http://www.amazon.com/Dumbing-Down-Our-Kids-Themselves/dp/0312148232 This book is all about reasons why academics take a back seat in public school and why you should hs for academic excellence. I am the most bleeding heart liberal you will ever meet but this book was an eye opener regarding the actual bs that passes for a degree in education. We hs for academic excellence and to avoid what I see as very twisted , ugly values being promulgated by institutional settings in which the savages(teens) are running the show.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as having a teaching degree, I asked that same question on these boards to all the people with teaching degrees. Read this thread to see what they said. (that you don't need them.)

 

And here's a thread I wrote explaining why I think that the academics are superior using one-on-one tutoring (aka homeschooling) as opposed to teaching exclusively in a group setting (public/private school.)

 

I use none of my teaching degree to hs my girls. I do want them to be educated.;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Her main thing is that I'm not certified and therefore am not qualified to educate my children. She also wanted to know the top reasons why parents prefer homeschooling over the traditional public school system. So I thought what better place to ask then here! Thanks for your help. :)

 

Academics and manners.

 

I would also let actions speak louder than words, and not debate this with MIL. Either she'll be pleased with the kids and come around, or she will refuse to, no matter what you say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel your pain, and I have to add my, "Why are you debating this with her?" These are your kids and she really has no say. She's trying to parent you and don't let her.

 

Are you a member of HSLDA? In this month's mag was a booklet put out with the NEHRI stats in them-BRILLIANT. Get your hands on one and give it to her if that would make you feel better.

 

Here's a shortened version

 

http://www.nheri.org/Latest/Homeschooling-Across-America-Academic-Achievement-and-Demographic-Characteristics.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First, I was afraid to send my precious babies on the bus away to a box for 7-8 hours a day.

Second, the less the government is involved in our lives the better. Plus our govenor has voiced an opinion of extending the school day and year. As if the children aren't away from their parents enough.

Third, what exactly do kids do all day in school? Get lots of bad habits!

Fourth, I have a vested interest in my childrens education. While I may not be certified like my MIL thinks all teachers should be(she is a retired 3rd grade teacher) I want nothing but the best for them. So I am going to what is best for them.

 

My MIL is not happy about us hsing. Well none of the grandparents are. As a practice, in our house My DH does all the 'conflict' conversations. I do the teaching. Even if it is teaching others about hsing. I love to talk about it and educate others. In the end what our parents or anyone else thinks does not matter. We all have to do what we feel is best.

I'm sure whatever your reasons are they are honorable and well thought out. Don't let her get to you;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We decided to homeschool when we realized there was no way the schools could meet our gifted son's educational needs, at least in the early grades. And we are leaning strongly towards homeschooling all of our kids because the individualization I can give them is vastly superior to any "accommodations" they might get in school. And I can do more than the school in less than 1/2 the time, giving them time to play and be kids, explore other interests, learn household stuff, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why did we decide to Homeschool?

 

Well, the clincher for us was that my dh's coworker came to work fuming. Her 6th grade daughter came home with a note saying that in s@x ed. they were going to teach @ral s@x as a technique to stay "technically a virgin" but still be able to participate in physical intimacy.

 

No one has the right to teach that to my children. I will not abdicate my parental rights because it's "the norm."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just had a heated debate with my MIL about my wanting to homeschool my daughters instead of putting them in public school and I just would like to know....why did you decide to homeschool over the public school system? I'm especially interested in hearing from those who have reasons other than religious. Don't get me wrong.....I am religious and a HUGE part of my rejection of public school is religious and the teaching of evolution, etc. but that doesn't matter to my MIL much. I'd love to hear a different argument for homeschooling.....one of superior academics.

 

Her main thing is that I'm not certified and therefore am not qualified to educate my children. She also wanted to know the top reasons why parents prefer homeschooling over the traditional public school system. So I thought what better place to ask then here! Thanks for your help. :)

 

I have absolutely no problems with public schools. I went to one from preK-12. It wasn't pretty all the time, but I made it through. I'd like to send DD to a public school, if she'll let me (she insists she wants to come home next fall because her brother is at home, and she's amazingly jealous because she thinks it's all fun and games lol), but we'll see.

 

However, my DS is at home because of special needs. He has issues that make it almost impossible for him to function in any sort of school setting. If he's in school, I am the parent receiving the phone calls or e-mails every week asking if I can help work on X or letting me know that my son did Y to Kid Z (though they never would give me the name of Kid Z so I could work on a proper apology with my son). He's bright - very bright - but socially inadequate. Even at his young age, kids know that and tend to pick on him, which makes his anxiety ramp up even further and makes him act out even more. He just flat doesn't understand. Being at home this fall has made a world of difference, up to and including him being off medication.

 

As for my qualifications as a teacher, if I know enough to teach him everything on the state requirement list, I figure I'm qualified. He *is* learning, and that's important to both him and me. I am also able to work on those social skills that he's deficient in, which a teacher in a school setting would not be able to do.

 

I hope your MIL is able to accept what you're deciding. Best wishes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read John Taylor Gatto's Underground History of American Education. Now I know that the so-called failings of our educational system are really successes for the ones who are orchestrating it. Nothing is perfect, but at least HS parents have the best interests of our children at heart. I don't blame the teachers. It's the people in the real places of power who are to blame.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Homeschooling my dc really wasn't on my horizon. I became incredibly frustrated with our local ps when my eldest struggled through k, 1st and 2nd without learning to read. Our school district is high performing and he was literally the only kid in the second grader, other than the special needs kids, who was unable to read. He didn't return to school for the third grade, instead we initally hired a private dyslexia remediation clinic called Lindamood-Bell to first test than remediate. This was incredibly helpful. We transitioned from in clinic services to home services with a tutor during the 3rd grade. By the end of that year I was tutoring him myself with their curriculum.

 

During this same period my younger son, in k, was experiencing health issues. He had pneumonia twice during that year and was subsequently diagnosed with Tourettes Syndrome.

 

Academically both my ds just do better at home. My eldest not only learned to read at grade level, but now really enjoys his reading time and reads extensively. My younger loves being home with his brother and, while his health is much improved, I just don't see the need to send him back to ps.

 

Our current plan is for my 7th grader to go on to our local high school in 9th grade. My little guy tells me that he doesn't want to return to school ever. We'll see.

 

Homeschooling was something we did because we needed to do it. That's it really.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a MEd in Elementary Education, but I have learned more in the past 2 years of homeschooling about what it really means to learn and be educated than I ever did in grad school. Being certified has nothing to do with the actual process of learning; a certified teacher can teach to the masses following a prescribed set of "rules" governed my an administration and bureacracy that is so out of touch with what kids really need. As a teacher, it frustrated me endlessly how little control & time I had to meet the needs of my students. All teachers struggle with this, so why put our children in a sub-par environment?

 

Homeschooling allows me to teach my son at his pace (which is faster than the school's), and it allows me to control his environment. Whenever my neighbor came over one day and said, "Guess what N's 1st grade recess conversation was about today?" and her answer was "sex", I immediately realized the ps environment was not going to work for my family. I used to teach 8th grade, so I knew what was out there, but I was naive enough to think it wasn't happening so young. Society is too rushed, and as a result we are forcing our children to grow up too fast. I'm not okay with that. Childhood is sacred. Our Christian values are also sacred. DH & I felt our children needed a firm foundation before sending them out to the wolves (so-to-speak). Teaching them at home allows us to set this foundation before exposing them to adult topics and problems.

 

Having been a certified teacher, another thing I must mention is the incredible quality of the curriculum choices available to homeschooling families. Some of the curriculum I've seen, reviewed, and used is top-notch... far better than you would find in a school. The resources are amazing, and they are often geared toward a variety of learners vs. the typical big publisher textbook (that usually contains errors btw) that expects everyone to learn by reading its little excerpts and doing basic comprehension questions. As much as teachers are "taught" to use the levels of Bloom's Taxonomy to reach higher level thinking skills, the implementation of it is so difficult because of the mediocre curriculum, time, and class size constraints. Once NCLB entered the arena, the reins were tightened even further, and true education is nearly nill because of these requirements.

 

I could rant on and on. Certification is a piece of paper; however, you could have it and be the worst teacher on earth. I've worked with enough incompetent colleagues to know that certification means you've paid to get the paper. I've seen uncertified homeschooling moms with more passion and desire for their kids to learn while using unbelievable techniques that work, than a room full of certified teachers who are supposed to have all the answers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I began homeschooling my dd in her 3rd grade year. She had attended private school for 3 years. Her Daddy was in administration. My intent was to homeschool her for 1 year, in order to have more time with her before she hit the pre-teen stage. Well...during that year her Daddy lost his job due to a school merger, so we lost free tuition. We decided to keep on homeschooling. I don't think dd would have wanted to go back to school anyway. I wouldn't have wanted her to either.

 

We would not be able to say that we will homeschool forever, but we will as long as we feel it is best. I started out doing mostly traditional school and have added elements of classical and CM this year. I lurked here all last year and finally read the book this summer. I'm having a hard time making the transition from traditional school, but trying.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...