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....who desires to educate her child using the Well-Trained Mind who has and untrained mind herself.

 

This is my second year homeschooling and as much as I absolutely love the Well-Trained Mind it has not been a fit for my son.

 

Furthermore, even if it were, with a limited education myself (hs grad but that is not saying much since I was schooled in FL) I feel I am ill-equipped to teach classically beyond the grammar stage.

 

How would I go about preparing and training myself so that I can possibly give my littles a classical education and feel confident doing so in the process.

 

Thanks all!

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I'm in your boat! I've thrown all caution to the wind and consider myself a student right along with my kids. So far, so good. I had no idea I would love history as much as I do! We'll see how it works out because I absolutely detest algebra (and quite frankly do not care to learn it *again* at this stage in my life!).

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I'm in your boat! I've thrown all caution to the wind and consider myself a student right along with my kids. So far, so good. I had no idea I would love history as much as I do! We'll see how it works out because I absolutely detest algebra (and quite frankly do not care to learn it *again* at this stage in my life!).

 

 

I would say that my education past 8th grade is but a fleeting memory. I was out of school more than I was present due to family circumstances. The education I do have was attained through the private school I attended in K-8. I received a good base but that is it. I love math and it seems to come naturally but I do not know Algebra. Same with history. My son and I are studying American History this year and it's as if it is all brand new to me. I don't even remember studying world history. It seems like everyday he is asking more and more questions that I cannot answer. Furthermore, from day to day, it seems that I cannot retain a thing. I feel scattered. I want be prepared for the next go-around.

 

With regard to Latin, I have First Form. Would that be a good starting place? Also, a suggestion for a good world history text would be great.

 

Thanks, ladies. You are the best! :grouphug:

Edited by blessed2fosteradopt
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Get The Well Educated Mind and start reading and/or get Susan's History of the Ancient World. It will give you a good overview of that time in history and help you to enrich your children's studies. You can pick up her recommended High School level texts for the rest of the cycle to fill in your knowledge of those times.

 

Get Rod and Staff English 6 and start working through it

 

Get a basic Latin course and start memorizing verbs.

 

Read Liping Ma's Knowing and teaching mathematics and then start refreshing your math knowledge.

 

In short - give yourself the education you never had.

 

Since you probably don't have all day to study you might want to pick the skill area that you feel weakest in and work form there. I suggest a skill area like Latin, math or grammar first because 1. you will need those before you need the in-depth lit and 2. the history and science and literature are easier to pick up along with your child than the skill building things that you need to teach a bit more.

 

Great post! Thank you!

 

I do have R&S 6 (we are finishing R&S 5 now) and this is one subject that I seem to have retained. Language arts, with the exception of writing, seems to be my strong suit. I am benefitting greatly from the grammar review and love R&S.

 

I will look into the other suggestions.

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You're not alone. Sadly, I had a decent education and a good college education, but was smart enough to slide by without ever really LEARNING anything. Then I had no desire to maintain any real knowledge or self-educate in any way until our kids came along and I started really thinking about HSing. I definitely want to create a different educational culture in our house and mindset in our kids.

 

You're so wise to be thinking ahead. I'll be :lurk5: the responses.

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Great advice so far. Getting your hands on great books and reading everything you can will help.

 

I am one of those who was smart enough to get through school without learning! I am loving homeschooling - I feel so smart!

 

I am learning along with my kids, but I found that I needed more help as I couldn't learn fast enough.

 

So I:

I found some moms who had been there done that, and I gleaned from them.

 

We joined Classical Conversations which was helped me find those moms. It also gave me access to a lot of training that helped me. Every year CC does free practicum workshops where you study a subject (they are open to everyone.) I have done their Latin, Trig, English, Logic, Writing and Economics. That helped a lot!

My dc do Essentials (IEW, grammar and math drill) Having someone else teach the grammar and writing is wonderful. We are in year 3 of Essentials, and I have learned so much!!

 

(At a secondary level they offer teaching in Challenge one day a week. Which is a huge help with the secondary stage. I am looking forward to learning along with the dc when we get there.)

 

I have attending teacher training with Veritas Press (twice in person) - they have some great "In a Week" classes over the summer.

 

I outsourced some things. I needed someone to help teach me. I hired Latin teacher for dd, and I sat in. That was a huge blessing. I learned and she learned. And she wasn't held back by me. :tongue_smilie:My dd has surpassed me. I thought I would eventually take that back, but I don't want to slow her down.

 

We have done some online classes. We are now doing Latin online now with www.latinandclassics.com We did some classes with Veritas Scholars online last year.

 

We took a class with Andrew Pudewa when he was here. DD did it and I sat in.

 

I look for as many opportunities as I can to learn myself. Where I can't keep up, I look for way to help meet that need for my kids.

Edited by Steph
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I agree with the other suggestions and would like to add one more: If TWEM seems daunting, the Latin-Centered Curriculum has a chapter on this issue. Personally, big books can overwhelm me, because I feel like I need to know all of it in 5 minutes. So, starting smaller and taking baby bites can sometimes help.

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There are some incredibly helpful resources here:

 

Available for instant download: http://www.welltrainedmind.com/store/educating-ourselves-as-we-educate-our-children-1.html

 

I just reread this one the other day. Inspiring. http://www.welltrainedmind.com/educating-ourselves-classical-education-for-adults/

 

Another great article:

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/a-checklist-for-self-education/

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I agree with the other suggestions and would like to add one more: If TWEM seems daunting, the Latin-Centered Curriculum has a chapter on this issue. Personally, big books can overwhelm me, because I feel like I need to know all of it in 5 minutes. So, starting smaller and taking baby bites can sometimes help.

 

Thank you. I did look at TWEM briefly once and it did intimidate me a bit. I do have LCC at home and will have to look at it again. Thanks for that suggestion.

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Many of us have been or are currently in your situation. self-education is important, I don't have much free time at all to work on all I would like(though if I cut back my online time and put reading popular fiction aside for a bit I would likely open up more) so instead I learn along side the kids. They know I do not have all the answers, my goal is to teach them how to learn and how to find the information they need, and I show that to them on a daily basis as I learn with them.

 

Once I am settled in my college courses I plan to start up on latin for myself so that I at least have a basic grasp of it(much like my grasp of french, not great but enough to help with teaching), and working through the well educated mind.

 

Do not be discouraged from using TWTM due to your own perceived lack of education. While there is many very well educated men and women on this board there is just as many, if not more, of us who have a regular ps education and despite the short comings of our own education are managing to still give our kids a very good education following TWTM. Go back to your book and read pages 622-624 for encouragement, SWB even states in those pages that "the teacher isn't a never-ceasing fount of information from which the student s continually drink up answers. Instead, the model of the classical teacher and students is that of leader and "disciples," meaning that the teacher and students are united together in the same task, learning am inherited body of knowledge together."

 

You are not expected to know it all all right away, just be committed to learning along side your kids and teaching them how to find information they need.

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