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I am an old (1999) WTM mom, just trying to figure out what I want to use this time around !!

 

Can you tell me what you are using? What you love? What you dropped?

 

Mainly I am looking for tried and true Grammar suggestions.

 

BTW: who would one contact to have a board added ??

Edited by alatexan68
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Can you tell me what you are using? What you love? What you dropped?

 

Mainly I am looking for tried and true Grammar suggestions.

 

BTW: who would one contact to have a board added ??

 

 

I really don't mean this to be snarky (I wouldn't touch the other thread about purity and WTM with a 10-foot pole!), so please don't take it that way.

 

If you desire to see my WTM pedigree, you can search Rhondabee on both this and the old board. My history is well-plastered in the archives! All the things I am currently using with my 6th grader (save Spelling) are WTM recommended products.

 

And, honestly, I have to say that for grammar, what you use just really doesn't matter. There is no "tried and true" grammar that will work for everyone. I used Abeka our first year homeschooling (5th grade, older ds), and have used Rod & Staff ever since. Why? Because it includes daily reviews, and the writing lessons are mixed in rather than included in one section in the back of the book, and my oldest really didn't take well to Writing Strands.

 

Truth be told, I just wasn't able to teach it well at the time given we were new homeschoolers, and I was nursing a 6-month old. I'm sure I could pull off an Abeka/writing Strands combo now, and maybe have a more interesting grammar/writing time than using R&S. Oh, well. The R&S is already here for my 2nd one. I admit, I always grow jealous reading Sue in St Pete's posts about using Analytical Grammar (also a WTM rec, BTW) and WriteShop (or some writing program - there are 2 or 3 that have very similar names).

 

If I had more kids, I would love to try the Wordsmith series. There used to be a SWB-written review on the main website, and she said she was going to use Wordsmith with her kids that summer - tho' she never came back and said how that went. And, it's always been a WTM-approved alterate program.

 

So, I guess my advice is to quit stressing about grammar. It's a skill. So, just pick something that will teach it, that won't drive you or your kids to tears, and that gets done each day. Then spend your time reading through the 5th-8th grade literature lists. *That's* what so incredibly special about WTM.

 

Blessings!

 

ETA: Actually, some would say that if I were *truly* classical, I'd simply teach English grammar through Latin. Let's just say now that my high schooler is in Latin II, I'm so thankful for online classes!

Edited by Rhondabee
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I really don't mean this to be snarky (I wouldn't touch the other thread about purity and WTM with a 10-foot pole!), so please don't take it that way.

 

If you desire to see my WTM pedigree, you can search Rhondabee on both this and the old board. My history is well-plastered in the archives! All the things I am currently using with my 6th grader (save Spelling) are WTM recommended products.

 

And, honestly, I have to say that for grammar, what you use just really doesn't matter. There is no "tried and true" grammar that will work for everyone. I used Abeka our first year homeschooling (5th grade, older ds), and have used Rod & Staff ever since. Why? Because it includes daily reviews, and the writing lessons are mixed in rather than included in one section in the back of the book, and my oldest really didn't take well to Writing Strands.

 

Truth be told, I just wasn't able to teach it well at the time given we were new homeschoolers, and I was nursing a 6-month old. I'm sure I could pull off an Abeka/writing Strands combo now, and maybe have a more interesting grammar/writing time than using R&S. Oh, well. The R&S is already here for my 2nd one. I admit, I always grow jealous reading Sue in St Pete's posts about using Analytical Grammar (also a WTM rec, BTW) and WriteShop (or some writing program - there are 2 or 3 that have very similar names).

 

If I had more kids, I would love to try the Wordsmith series. There used to be a SWB-written review on the main website, and she said she was going to use Wordsmith with her kids that summer - tho' she never came back and said how that went. And, it's always been a WTM-approved alterate program.

 

So, I guess my advice is to quit stressing about grammar. It's a skill. So, just pick something that will teach it, that won't drive you or your kids to tears, and that gets done each day. Then spend your time reading through the 5th-8th grade literature lists. *That's* what so incredibly special about WTM.

 

Blessings!

 

ETA: Actually, some would say that if I were *truly* classical, I'd simply teach English grammar through Latin. Let's just say now that my high schooler is in Latin II, I'm so thankful for online classes!

 

 

In all my years I have never found a grammar I really love, or a math. There are many new things out there that I weren't available the last time I had little ones.

 

Latin now, I am pretty convinced I will start with Lively Latin, as soon as my son is fluently reading. But who knows, our best laid plans are sometimes derailed.

 

Thanks for taking the time to answer !!

 

Jana (P.S. I don't care what anyone else does, I just want a narrower opinion..... I guess .)

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I'm going to ask the obvious question: Have you looked at the recommendations in TWTM?

 

Like Rhondabee said, grammar is grammar. What works well for me might not for you. That said, I like Rod and Staff, and the First Language lesson series for the youngers. There is a new grammar series for youngers, too, called Language Lessons Through Literature, which I think is excellent.

 

For the olders, I'm one of those crazy LCC folk who drop grammar as a separate subject, and just use Latin, and Classical Writing :D

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I'm going to ask the obvious question: Have you looked at the recommendations in TWTM?

 

Like Rhondabee said, grammar is grammar. What works well for me might not for you. That said, I like Rod and Staff, and the First Language lesson series for the youngers. There is a new grammar series for youngers, too, called Language Lessons Through Literature, which I think is excellent.

 

For the olders, I'm one of those crazy LCC folk who drop grammar as a separate subject, and just use Latin, and Classical Writing :D

 

At what age do you drop grammar? Or how many years do you do grammar?

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I'm going to ask the obvious question: Have you looked at the recommendations in TWTM?

 

Like Rhondabee said, grammar is grammar. What works well for me might not for you. That said, I like Rod and Staff, and the First Language lesson series for the youngers. There is a new grammar series for youngers, too, called Language Lessons Through Literature, which I think is excellent.

 

For the olders, I'm one of those crazy LCC folk who drop grammar as a separate subject, and just use Latin, and Classical Writing :D

 

Yes, I have the 1999, 2004 and 2009 versions. I am looking for personal opinons on the older and newer, not only grammar. But what do you love.

 

I have seen things like Lively Latin, Minimus, Classical Writing and tons more. I was hoping I could get some opinions is all.

 

Geez maybe it was the wrong day to ask, with all the other crud going on.

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Yes, I have the 1999, 2004 and 2009 versions. I am looking for personal opinons on the older and newer, not only grammar. But what do you love.

 

I have seen things like Lively Latin, Minimus, Classical Writing and tons more. I was hoping I could get some opinions is all.

 

Geez maybe it was the wrong day to ask, with all the other crud going on.

 

I love Writing With Ease. I also love Classical Writing, but it was too time intensive at the time I tried to use it. I plan on moving my older two into it next year. We're using Imitations in Writing as an introduction to writing.

 

Minimus is fun & cute. So is Song School Latin. My 5th grader is doing Latin Prep and doing well, and my 4th grader is using Getting Started With Latin as a fill in until I find something else for him. We did Latin for Children previously, but I was a horrid teacher and it left a bad taste in their mouth. Because of their competitiveness, I'm choosing to keep them separate in Latin for now. I'm actually considering Lively Latin for him.

 

For English grammar, we use Rod & Staff, except for ds9 who is doing Hake grammar. He had the choice, and he chose Hake because he loves Saxon math and Hake grammar is quite similar.

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I am an old (1999) WTM mom, just trying to figure out what I want to use this time around !!

 

Can you tell me what you are using? What you love? What you dropped?

 

Mainly I am looking for tried and true Grammar suggestions.

 

BTW: who would one contact to have a board added ??

 

What we are doing is in my signature. :)

 

I did Rod and Staff Grammar 2, 3, and 4 with my oldest. We switched this year to First Language Lessons and Writing with Ease and I am so glad that we did! We all like grammar so much better now!

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At what age do you drop grammar? Or how many years do you do grammar?

 

It really depends on the student. In general, I drop grammar when they can handle Latin on the level of Latin for Children (subject-verb-object, transitive verbs vs. intransitive, present/past/future, person/number).

 

With my older kids, I dropped it whenever they started CW Aesop. At that time they were probably also doing Latin for Children.

 

With my younger kids, we don't plan to use LfC ...

 

argh. I'm making this too complicated. Let's say around 4th grade :) Definitely by 5th grade.

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I love Writing With Ease. I also love Classical Writing, but it was too time intensive at the time I tried to use it. I plan on moving my older two into it next year. We're using Imitations in Writing as an introduction to writing.

 

Minimus is fun & cute. So is Song School Latin. My 5th grader is doing Latin Prep and doing well, and my 4th grader is using Getting Started With Latin as a fill in until I find something else for him. We did Latin for Children previously, but I was a horrid teacher and it left a bad taste in their mouth. Because of their competitiveness, I'm choosing to keep them separate in Latin for now. I'm actually considering Lively Latin for him.

 

For English grammar, we use Rod & Staff, except for ds9 who is doing Hake grammar. He had the choice, and he chose Hake because he loves Saxon math and Hake grammar is quite similar.

 

I stopped separate grammar with my children by 6th or 7th. Once I felt they had a firm grasp.

 

Thanks for listing your favorites, many are ones I am currently looking at. :D

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It really depends on the student. In general, I drop grammar when they can handle Latin on the level of Latin for Children (subject-verb-object, transitive verbs vs. intransitive, present/past/future, person/number).

 

With my older kids, I dropped it whenever they started CW Aesop. At that time they were probably also doing Latin for Children.

 

With my younger kids, we don't plan to use LfC ...

 

argh. I'm making this too complicated. Let's say around 4th grade :) Definitely by 5th grade.

 

Thanks--this was helpful. I'm toying with the idea of re-teaching myself grammar from Rod & Staff 7 or higher and dropping grammar next year.

 

But now---if you don't plan to use LfC for your younger kids, what are you going to use :D?

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Jana, I wasn't sure what you wanted, given your title. Things have changed a lot since you homeschooled your olders! There are so many options now that are popular within the classical movement, and all of them have their strengths. So instead of one good option, you now have 4 or 5, kwim? And the materials keep evolving and increasing. I have a 9 1/2 year gap in my kids, so I expect the same thing will happen to me when I come to do K5 a few years from now!

 

I think you can't go wrong getting FLL and WWE and using them in some fashion. Most of the other stuff you don't need till later (Writing Tales vs. CW vs. something else). The writing options keep evolving, and by the time your kids get to 3rd or 4th to use them, I'm guessing SWB will have more stuff and LToW will have more levels and...

 

For the latin, I would think Lively Latin is a bit more than you need for a 5 yo. Why not start with Prima Latina or Song School Latin?

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Jana, I wasn't sure what you wanted, given your title. Things have changed a lot since you homeschooled your olders! There are so many options now that are popular within the classical movement, and all of them have their strengths. So instead of one good option, you now have 4 or 5, kwim? And the materials keep evolving and increasing. I have a 9 1/2 year gap in my kids, so I expect the same thing will happen to me when I come to do K5 a few years from now!

 

I think you can't go wrong getting FLL and WWE and using them in some fashion. Most of the other stuff you don't need till later (Writing Tales vs. CW vs. something else). The writing options keep evolving, and by the time your kids get to 3rd or 4th to use them, I'm guessing SWB will have more stuff and LToW will have more levels and...

 

For the latin, I would think Lively Latin is a bit more than you need for a 5 yo. Why not start with Prima Latina or Song School Latin?

 

I am not looking at using it with my children yet. I am that really has to check thing out hands on, before teaching. Call me a curriculum addict. So I am just trying to cut down the choices a bit.

 

These two children are already unlike my olders. In that they learn so much easier and faster. My three year old is reading already. It will be a hard line to walk with him. I am wanting to incorporate tons of additional reading in with the WTM. As I don't feel it will keep him busy at all. He has completed P 3/4 and P 4/5 each in just the last 6 months, along with D'Aulaire's Mythology, Aesops Fables, and many others. We are doing a second round with some additions now. So truthfully, I am trying to get a leg up on him. So I can go deeper and wider. I need time to gather....

 

Jana

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Well, let's see...we have been doing this since 1991 and have used and passed on quite a few things over the years.

 

Used Explode the Code but it seemed like just too many worksheets and we weren't really retaining anything and the pictures bugged me - at least once a day we would have trouble figuring out what they were supposed to be. We use Jolly Phonics now for reading. We love their readers but also use Bob Books. We also use and like Spelling Workout and it has been pretty successful for us. We also use the Word Study books from the same publisher. We have discovered a spelling program that I like better though - Primary Spelling by Pattern & Spellography - sold by Sopris West.

 

We used to use Saxon when it was the best thing available but since Singapore became widely available etc. we have used it. To me it is more of a "why" math. Saxon seems, to me more of a "how" math. My big kids used Saxon and have done fine in college.

 

I love the WTM but the WWE and FLL stuff just went too slow for us. We use a similar program - Primary Language Lessons/Imtermediate Language Lessons - the ones by Serle and the free one on google books.

 

We follow the history method and books pretty closely and have never had any doubts or troubles. We do take a year out here and there to specialty stuff like the American history we are doing right now.

 

I have never really been able to get the science to work out for us. I have more science books than anything else. The thing we have finally settled on that we love is Singapore My Pals are Here. It is not the word/language/nature study oriented way of doing things but it is pretty thorough and rigorous and we like it. We also use Real Sciene 4 Kids. My big kids used Apologia but don't know if we will do that again.

 

We like the logic books from Prufock Press better than the Critical Thinking Press. I used Traditional Logic with my older kids but haven't decided to do this time around. We also use all of the Vocabulary recommendations - I don't think they have changed much and we are still happy with them.

 

We use Writing Strands, Six Trait Writing and a non-curriculum version of classical writing. I just bought the Composition in the Classical Tradition book and we do it on our own. I have also used a lot of different literature studies over the years. We use DITHOR for younger kids and various Progeny Press and other guide for older. But we have been doing this for so long that discussing literature has become kind of second nature. I have a lot of reference books for my use on lit. analysis and terminology but not really a curriculum or program for the kids. My older kids used LLATL and turned out fine-but it was the best thing available at the time. I think we do better with piecing it together ourselves these days.

 

For grammar as a subject we use a bunch of stuff on a rotating basis - Evan-Moor, Jolly Grammar, Junior Analytical & Analytical Grammar, Hake, Mary Daly's Diagramming. We also bought the Outlining books recommended when they were still in print (that is how long we have been doing this) and have been happily using them ever since.

 

We have tried various latin over the years and are now using the new Latin program from Memoria - First Form Latin

 

hmmm...that's a lot of information. Kind of boring reading through it ;)

 

I envy your second round. I just have one logic age kid of my own and am co-opting other peoples kids. Not ready to be done. I am having a great time doing this still after all these years.

Edited by jcooperetc
now using Not not using...
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Well, let's see...we have been doing this since 1991 and have used and passed on quite a few things over the years.

 

Used Explode the Code but it seemed like just too many worksheets and we weren't really retaining anything and the pictures bugged me - at least once a day we would have trouble figuring out what they were supposed to be. We use Jolly Phonics now for reading. We love their readers but also use Bob Books. We also use and like Spelling Workout and it has been pretty successful for us. We also use the Word Study books from the same publisher. We have discovered a spelling program that I like better though - Primary Spelling by Pattern & Spellography - sold by Sopris West.

 

We used to use Saxon when it was the best thing available but since Singapore became widely available etc. we have used it. To me it is more of a "why" math. Saxon seems, to me more of a "how" math. My big kids used Saxon and have done fine in college.

 

I love the WTM but the WWE and FLL stuff just went too slow for us. We use a similar program - Primary Language Lessons/Imtermediate Language Lessons - the ones by Serle and the free one on google books.

 

We follow the history method and books pretty closely and have never had any doubts or troubles. We do take a year out here and there to specialty stuff like the American history we are doing right now.

 

I have never really been able to get the science to work out for us. I have more science books than anything else. The thing we have finally settled on that we love is Singapore My Pals are Here. It is not the word/language/nature study oriented way of doing things but it is pretty thorough and rigorous and we like it. We also use Real Sciene 4 Kids. My big kids used Apologia but don't know if we will do that again.

 

We like the logic books from Prufock Press better than the Critical Thinking Press. I used Traditional Logic with my older kids but haven't decided to do this time around. We also use all of the Vocabulary recommendations - I don't think they have changed much and we are still happy with them.

 

We use Writing Strands, Six Trait Writing and a non-curriculum version of classical writing. I just bought the Composition in the Classical Tradition book and we do it on our own. I have also used a lot of different literature studies over the years. We use DITHOR for younger kids and various Progeny Press and other guide for older. But we have been doing this for so long that discussing literature has become kind of second nature. I have a lot of reference books for my use on lit. analysis and terminology but not really a curriculum or program for the kids. My older kids used LLATL and turned out fine-but it was the best thing available at the time. I think we do better with piecing it together ourselves these days.

 

For grammar as a subject we use a bunch of stuff on a rotating basis - Evan-Moor, Jolly Grammar, Junior Analytical & Analytical Grammar, Hake, Mary Daly's Diagramming. We also bought the Outlining books recommended when they were still in print (that is how long we have been doing this) and have been happily using them ever since.

 

We have tried various latin over the years and are not using the new Latin program from Memoria - First Form Latin

 

hmmm...that's a lot of information. Kind of boring reading through it ;)

 

I envy your second round. I just have one logic age kid of my own and am co-opting other peoples kids. Not ready to be done. I am having a great time doing this still after all these years.

 

 

Wow !! Thanks. That gives me lots to think about.

 

As for a second time around.... I didn't plan it this way. My family was complete years ago, or so I thought. Then my baby ( 18 now ) turned 10..... well I realized I wasn't done. Took a bit of work, but the tubal ligation reversal finally worked. :D

 

I can't wait to see what we come up with this time around. I was for the most part happy with most of the things we used years ago. But am really excited about all the choices now !!

 

I am sure at least 2 of the grandbabies will be homeschooling also. They stay at grandma's daycare. ;)

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Then my baby ( 18 now ) turned 10..... well I realized I wasn't done. Took a bit of work, but the tubal ligation reversal finally worked. :D

 

You are so BRAVE! Good for you for following your instincts.

 

I don't know about brave......... but they sure bring us joy !! It is amazing how much we change over the years..... I am such a different parent now.

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I am not sure I'd qualify as a strict WTM follower. I am not even sure if I could define who that person might be, but I do have a number of years of experience. With my youngest child just slightly younger than yours, I am using FLL, WWE and SOTW. All three of these used together form a whole approach to language, writing and history. All of it is secular. I do like Shurley English for grammar, but only for a few years say grades 4 & 5. It does get a bit repetative, yet the retention of parts of speach is hands down the best I've come across. In fact now that I am using Hake in the upper grades, what was learned in Shurley fills in some of the sparse definitions offered in Hake. And yes, I do like Hake and use it for 7th grade. Like Shurley, Hake is also repetative. Shurley does not cover sentence diagramming; Hake does cover diagramming. Both offer writing and outlineing, but neither is great. I've found other resources for writing. The cost for Shurley, Hake, FLL, WWE, and SOTW is reasonable.

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I am not sure I'd qualify as a strict WTM follower. I am not even sure if I could define who that person might be, but I do have a number of years of experience. With my youngest child just slightly younger than yours, I am using FLL, WWE and SOTW. All three of these used together form a whole approach to language, writing and history. All of it is secular. I do like Shurley English for grammar, but only for a few years say grades 4 & 5. It does get a bit repetative, yet the retention of parts of speach is hands down the best I've come across. In fact now that I am using Hake in the upper grades, what was learned in Shurley fills in some of the sparse definitions offered in Hake. And yes, I do like Hake and use it for 7th grade. Like Shurley, Hake is also repetative. Shurley does not cover sentence diagramming; Hake does cover diagramming. Both offer writing and outlineing, but neither is great. I've found other resources for writing. The cost for Shurley, Hake, FLL, WWE, and SOTW is reasonable.

 

Thanks, I used Shurley way back when. Hake is one I have considered. I already have SOTW. Will bet getting FLL and WWE very soon.

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My oldest learned to read when she was 3 1/2. I did a condensed version of FLL 1/2 for her Kindergarten year. She wasn't ready for the copywork or dictation though because of her fine motor skills. For 1st, I used WWE1 and for various reasons did not do formal grammar (long story).

 

This year for 2nd, I'm using a non-traditional grammar program for 1st semester (Story Grammar for Elementary Students by Don Killgallon) and am debating what to use for 2nd semester. I'm debating between FLL 4, GWG 4, JAG, and Saxon/Hake Grammar 5.

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My oldest learned to read when she was 3 1/2. I did a condensed version of FLL 1/2 for her Kindergarten year. She wasn't ready for the copywork or dictation though because of her fine motor skills. For 1st, I used WWE1 and for various reasons did not do formal grammar (long story).

 

This year for 2nd, I'm using a non-traditional grammar program for 1st semester (Story Grammar for Elementary Students by Don Killgallon) and am debating what to use for 2nd semester. I'm debating between FLL 4, GWG 4, JAG, and Saxon/Hake Grammar 5.

 

This is what I am terrified of personally. I feel he will be capable, but I don't want to lead him to far ahead. But sometimes you just have to, to keep them occupied. Thanks !! At least I know I won't be alone.

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What's "strict?" I mean, I loathe the WTM math and science, and I do neither official narrations nor dictations, though we actually do incorporate both informally. But we study Latin, do a chronological history (mixed up a bit, though--we use several spines in succession, then do supplemental reaiding), do SWO spelling (though it's mostly for handwriting practice), think grammar is important, and practice handwriting daily.

 

We started GWG2 at the end of the year last year. Tried 1, but DS hated it because it was a bit too simple. We're just doing a page a day which is a bit slower than 2 pages/3x per week that's planned. Repetition gets old fast here, so we'll skip to Junior Analytical Grammar next, followed by Analytical Grammar, and then we'll be done.

 

Honestly, there just aren't that many topics in grammar. Once you've got it, you've got it.

 

I guess that's why I'm not a "real" classical schooler. :001_rolleyes:

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What's "strict?" I mean, I loathe the WTM math and science, and I do neither official narrations nor dictations, though we actually do incorporate both informally. But we study Latin, do a chronological history (mixed up a bit, though--we use several spines in succession, then do supplemental reaiding), do SWO spelling (though it's mostly for handwriting practice), think grammar is important, and practice handwriting daily.

 

We started GWG2 at the end of the year last year. Tried 1, but DS hated it because it was a bit too simple. We're just doing a page a day which is a bit slower than 2 pages/3x per week that's planned. Repetition gets old fast here, so we'll skip to Junior Analytical Grammar next, followed by Analytical Grammar, and then we'll be done.

 

Honestly, there just aren't that many topics in grammar. Once you've got it, you've got it.

 

I guess that's why I'm not a "real" classical schooler. :001_rolleyes:

 

Well to me classical is latin based / literature based/ history based. I do tend to like most of SBW's suggestions. I require my children to do atleast 2 languages besides Latin. Four years of Foreign Language, English, Math, Science, Arts, Music, etc. I do the history and science rotations.

 

I don't think there is a pat answer to that question. There are just as many variations as there are homeschoolers I suppose.

 

I think most people would call me the overkill type. But it worked for my olders. Hopefully it will with these too.

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I am not looking at using it with my children yet. I am that really has to check thing out hands on, before teaching. Call me a curriculum addict. So I am just trying to cut down the choices a bit.

 

These two children are already unlike my olders. In that they learn so much easier and faster. My three year old is reading already. It will be a hard line to walk with him. I am wanting to incorporate tons of additional reading in with the WTM. As I don't feel it will keep him busy at all. He has completed P 3/4 and P 4/5 each in just the last 6 months, along with D'Aulaire's Mythology, Aesops Fables, and many others. We are doing a second round with some additions now. So truthfully, I am trying to get a leg up on him. So I can go deeper and wider. I need time to gather....

 

Jana

Check out Michael Clay Thomas LA.

 

I am planning to use McRuffy with DS. I am just tired of juggling a bunch of LA programs and worrying that I missed or skimmed over something. Slow-and-steady all-in-one is sounding good. I will probably still start it early though.

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Well to me classical is latin based / literature based/ history based. I do tend to like most of SBW's suggestions. I require my children to do atleast 2 languages besides Latin. Four years of Foreign Language, English, Math, Science, Arts, Music, etc. I do the history and science rotations.

 

I don't think there is a pat answer to that question. There are just as many variations as there are homeschoolers I suppose.

 

I think most people would call me the overkill type. But it worked for my olders. Hopefully it will with these too.

 

What do the science rotations have to do with classical ed? :confused:

 

From your definition, we wouldn't be classical, as I make no attempt to tie math and science to history! Hey, but neither would SWB's foreign language, arts, or music. :-)

 

I'd love my kids to take solfege and counterpoint! That would be awesome. But I think most people would think I was crazy here, too.

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What do the science rotations have to do with classical ed? :confused:

 

From your definition, we wouldn't be classical, as I make no attempt to tie math and science to history! Hey, but neither would SWB's foreign language, arts, or music. :-)

 

I'd love my kids to take solfege and counterpoint! That would be awesome. But I think most people would think I was crazy here, too.

 

 

Ok, I give.

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Jana, are you aware of the really great conventions going on these days? We have one in Cincinnati that both SWB and JW are coming to next year. It's mind-boggling big, at least for Ohio. Something like that would give you three days to handle stuff. I know what you mean about shopping ahead; I went to my first convention when dd was 9 months old. :) That said, you still start at the beginning. I'm saying the information and curricula clarifying the progression of skills have expanded. You're still going to want WWE and FLL, even if you use them differently (which we did) or at a different age. You might also find it helpful to read on the accelerated board, especially looking for posts by Abbeyej. If you find a post by someone you find thought-provoking, you can right-click their name and pull up an option to read all posts by them. Sometimes I do that on a winter's eve, and it's incredible informative. You won't see her posts from the old board, but at least it's something. One thing she did that I thought was particularly interesting and want to replicate with my next is the use of shorter spines while they're young (CHOW, Gombrich, etc.). I think it would work for american too with the Rainbow Book of American History, etc. And yes, the WTM recs are always light or behind us. It's written to the average (or slightly above?) and kids are up and down from that.

 

Have fun researching, and definitely find some good conventions! :)

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Jana, it's not at all unusual to have people doing FLL1/2 in K5. I don't know if you hear about it on the boards as much these days, but back when my dd was that age it was pretty common. But when you do that, you sort of cringe at the thought of having your 1st grader do R&S3, even with modification, kwim? That's when you start to get out of the box and use some of the more interesting options out there. The MCT stuff is public school stuff, doesn't interest me. But Writing Tales, CW (which now has pre-Aesop level materials, btw), stuff from VP, there's lots of good stuff out there to keep them progressing in reasonable, fun ways. I latched onto Shurley for grammar, which seems to fit my grammar-hating dd well, and we move forward in it, never too heavily, while moving parallel with writing programs. Some of the writing programs like WT and CW integrate grammar, so it's easy to pick a more fun or personality-suited option for grammar and still keep up the rigor. That's what I was saying, that things have changed a LOT. You don't necessarily have to beat them over the head with R&S for 8 years to have good results, not with all the wonderful new materials we have.

 

Don't be afraid to advance the WTM recs. You're probably just going to have to add to them and advance a year, especially if you school year-round. It's pretty common. You're just not seeing the posts that reflect it.

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Jana, are you aware of the really great conventions going on these days? We have one in Cincinnati that both SWB and JW are coming to next year. It's mind-boggling big, at least for Ohio. Something like that would give you three days to handle stuff. I know what you mean about shopping ahead; I went to my first convention when dd was 9 months old. :) That said, you still start at the beginning. I'm saying the information and curricula clarifying the progression of skills have expanded. You're still going to want WWE and FLL, even if you use them differently (which we did) or at a different age. You might also find it helpful to read on the accelerated board, especially looking for posts by Abbeyej. If you find a post by someone you find thought-provoking, you can right-click their name and pull up an option to read all posts by them. Sometimes I do that on a winter's eve, and it's incredible informative. You won't see her posts from the old board, but at least it's something. One thing she did that I thought was particularly interesting and want to replicate with my next is the use of shorter spines while they're young (CHOW, Gombrich, etc.). I think it would work for american too with the Rainbow Book of American History, etc. And yes, the WTM recs are always light or behind us. It's written to the average (or slightly above?) and kids are up and down from that.

 

Have fun researching, and definitely find some good conventions! :)

 

I have not been out to a convention in a long time. Maybe it is time to go LOL

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I do go to the Accelerated board, but it is pretty slow.

 

You can still get to part of the old boards, back to 2006 I think. I was looking yesterday. I can't find any back when I was really active though. It's been a few years. :D

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He is only 3.... So I must go wider and deeper. I have no concern with them moving ahead when a bit older, but he is still my baby.
DD was reading (more than just CVC words) adding, and subtracting at 3. I have not had a big problem keeping up with her. Momof7 has good advice about teaching little ones. You might check out some of her posts. Edited by Lovedtodeath
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These are my recommendations:

 

Grammar:

K-1st – FLL

2nd – 8th – Rod & Staff

 

 

Spelling:

Rod & Staff

 

 

Writing:

Early Grades: Writing with Ease

After that: Classical Writing

 

 

Phonics:

Abeka Phonics Grade 1

 

 

Math:

Grades 1-3: Abeka

Grades 4-8: Rod & Staff

 

 

 

Latin:

Prima Latina

Latina Christiana I

Latina Christiana II

Henle Latin

 

 

 

History:

Grammar Stage: STOW & Activity Book

Logic Stage: Kingfisher serves as our spine, corresponding chapter(s) are read in STOW so all the kids have one book in common, add’l literature and non-fiction books to correspond with the week’s readings

 

 

Science:

Grades 1-5: A mix of things that I put together

Grades 6-8: PH Science with supplemental books

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Oh yes, some new things you might like to have a look at

 

Science: REAL Science Odyssey, Elemental Science

 

If you want a packaged SOTW curriculum with lots of picture books, that is in my sig.

 

Math: Math Mammoth is said to be a more independent version of Singapore Math. CLE is said to be a more independent version of Saxon.

 

Spelling: Simply Spelling, Rod and Staff, All About Spelling

 

I don't know if you have used Sonlight readers before, but we are enjoying the 2 Intermediate (we thought the readers before this level were "baby books" and hated them. lol) She can read above this level, but we have had some problems and are starting over with ramping up the rigor.

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