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We had our evaluation today and the OT said ds would definitely qualify for services. My major question is how does this impact our schooling?

 

Ds is sensory avoidance, but most things he avoids don't have to do with school - water, getting his feet off the ground, the dentist in his mouth, and the usual loud sounds & bright lights, tags in shirts, etc. Asberger's has been ruled out, so that is not in play here.

 

As far as I can tell, ds is working on grade level. The OT thought he could use help with fine motor skills (I agree with scissors) but she mentioned his pencil grip, which I think is ridiculous since we have used the writing claw, I check his grip constantly and he enjoys handwriting and shows no problems with the K workbook. I thought fine motor skills in boys often matured later anyway? I'd like to point out that he just turned 5 and also has only been writing letters for about 5-6 weeks.

 

For those of you with dc with SPD-sensory avoidance, how does it impact your schooling? Ds doesn't show any cognitive delays (actually his auditory processing/vocab is at a very high level for his age), is reading at a K level and is very math intuitive. Yet I still feel like the OT is reaching to find problems with his schooling?:confused: She did not seem to be very homeschooling friendly (although she was pleasant enough on the phone) and recommended I try to get him into school.

 

What should I expect at a follow up? I already feel defensive about him and homeschooling. Its like they don't expect him to be where he is - which I think is ansynchronous development. Is that common for SPD?

 

(Yikes, reading this over I realize there is a jumble of feelings and issues here, feel free to tackle any/all or just share your experiences - thanks!)

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I have one who is a sensory avoider and one who is a sensory seeker. The SS gets on the SA's nerves quite a bit, so SA will work in her bedroom quite a bit. The other issue is that SA is hypersensitive to noise. If the house is quiet, she still hears the refrigerator and gets annoyed by it.

 

Our OT helped my 8 yo quite a bit with handwriting. But my 8 yo has fine motor delays and is dyslexic. I don't think SPD alone would have caused issues with handwriting. My 8 yo is the sensory seeker, and that's quite disruptive to homeschooling, much more than sensory avoidance in our case.

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Guest yayadaisy

We to have a son with some sensory problems and autism and when our doctor and the school (we had him in preschool and he was on an IEP) found out about us homeschooling him this year. They both suggested we put him in school for the socialiaztion and learning how to deal with some of his sensory issues. But my thought was he is only six and already developmentaly behind in some areas and does not talk around others hardly. Why make him suffer through a whole day of school, which he hated preschool. I had to drag him in there every week! At home he talks to me, dad and sibling pretty good. Does not get teased and is just more at peace. We have him involved in activites throughout the week where he is with other kids so he is still getting socializtion and having to deal with some of his sensory issues but on a much smaller level. More like baby steps for him as he gets used to it he is more comfortable and willing to try new things. I think the professionals are just so used to most kids going to school, that they forget parents can do a good job too! Keep doing what you are doing and as you go along you will find things that work and somethings won't. But you know your child best and have the best in mind for him. They are all special blessing from God and he gave them to us just as they are "Perfect!!" I would suggest to keep bringing him to OT if it is needed it will help him with his SPD and the OT may have some good information for you. I know sometimes you can feel pressure from the professinals to do the "normal thing" but I think once they see how deicated you are to your son. They will see how hard you work with him and know you are doing just as good if not better than the school could! Just my thoughts. Hope this helps.

 

Sheila

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"Yet I still feel like the OT is reaching to find problems with his schooling?"

 

It may simply be that she is "reaching" to define things in a way that will be covered under an IEP, so that the state will pick up the tab for his therapies.

 

My SS kindergartner is also thriving in the homeschool setting and working at or above grade level except for find motor (for which he receives OT). I think homeschooling is a great choice for many kids with SPD. The OT may not think so, but ultimately that's not your problem. Her job is to work on your ds' fine motor skills and help her learn to navigate his SA issues, and hopefully if you are responsive to her concerns, complete any "homework" she gives, etc., she will come to understand that what you are doing is working well for your child and your family.

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We had our evaluation today and the OT said ds would definitely qualify for services. My major question is how does this impact our schooling?

 

Ds is sensory avoidance, but most things he avoids don't have to do with school - water, getting his feet off the ground, the dentist in his mouth, and the usual loud sounds & bright lights, tags in shirts, etc. Asberger's has been ruled out, so that is not in play here.

 

As far as I can tell, ds is working on grade level. The OT thought he could use help with fine motor skills (I agree with scissors) but she mentioned his pencil grip, which I think is ridiculous since we have used the writing claw, I check his grip constantly and he enjoys handwriting and shows no problems with the K workbook. I thought fine motor skills in boys often matured later anyway? I'd like to point out that he just turned 5 and also has only been writing letters for about 5-6 weeks.

 

For those of you with dc with SPD-sensory avoidance, how does it impact your schooling? Ds doesn't show any cognitive delays (actually his auditory processing/vocab is at a very high level for his age), is reading at a K level and is very math intuitive. Yet I still feel like the OT is reaching to find problems with his schooling?:confused: She did not seem to be very homeschooling friendly (although she was pleasant enough on the phone) and recommended I try to get him into school.

 

What should I expect at a follow up? I already feel defensive about him and homeschooling. Its like they don't expect him to be where he is - which I think is ansynchronous development. Is that common for SPD?

 

(Yikes, reading this over I realize there is a jumble of feelings and issues here, feel free to tackle any/all or just share your experiences - thanks!)

Asynchronous development is from my understanding always a part of SPD. My son began OT at age 7 for fine motor delays. I began noticing the delays earlier but kept thinking, "Oh, boys mature later and he will grow out of this." I also noticed other sensory issues much like your son. Honestly, I wish I had begun therapy at age 6 and that I had addressed the sensory issues even earlier when I began seeing them. By age 7 my son's writing delays seriously impacted his school work. While he could handle the cognitive end, he couldn't handle the writing. Remember, each year the writing expectations increase in any curriculum you use. Many phonics programs include writing as the kinesthetic part of the multisensory method. Grip is an odd thing with OTs. It may be that she is noting something about his grip - like pressure exerted, total arm movement, or some other something we would not typically notice. My son's OT closely monitored his consistency of pressure, how much he moved his wrist/arm, how fluid his movements were....

 

By 7 his sensory issues were become more serious as well as he developed coping mechanisms to deal with them. Sometimes his coping mechanisms were more disruptive than the actual thing he was trying to avoid. The saddest things were when the sensory issues lead to him stopping activities he loved because he couldn't deal with the sensory input any longer. My sports loving, train enthusiast stopped sports when he decided he couldn't handle the bright or inconsistent lights and stopped visiting train stations (even though he has always wanted to be an engineer) because he was in pain from the sounds. Not to mention for clothing I spent hours trying to find things that he could wear - socks in particular.

 

Our OT wasn't very fond of homeschooling either, but she knew that we worked hard with him at home and it showed in his progress. Even though she never became a fan of homeschooling in general, she was saying by the end how wonderful homeschooling was for him, and us as a family.

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It sounds like you are mixing up the OT's lack of enthusiasm for homeschooling with the appropriateness of her addressing some issues which are related to his education. I don't blame you - I would have my defenses up too.

 

OTs are going to look at a child's issues which OTs normally address, and handwriting is one of those issues. No, a 5 year old isn't expected to have great handwritng, but it is easier to prevent grip problems than correct them, so she would be thinking it needs to be addressed. Also, he is old enough to start expecting correct grip without the claw. I would use it some if it works for him, and look over his shoulder and ask him to write without it a portion of his handwriting time. He really doesn't need more than 20 - 30 minutes of handwriting at the most a day. If it is torture to him (although you said he enjoys handwriting), you could even back down to 10 minutes once or twice a day. You should be able to have some inoput into what she spends her time on with him in therapy, and should be able to discuss with her what is important to you for him to progress in regards to what OT works with. For example, I would listen to what she says about handwriting, and if it makes sense say you will incorporate that into work at home and that you prefer he work with such and such issues in OT because that is what you are most concerned with and is affecting his ability to function at home. She will still want to check his handwriting periodically and reassure herself that he is making progress in that area. She may also want to send handwriting homework home with you for him to complete - bring the pages back and show her so she is reassured that he is doing them at home. This will only work if she is a reasonable person and comfortable enough to back off in that area. What she works on with him may also be influenced by what she has to document to maintain reimbursement for OT or the school to meet whatever criteria they have for him to receive OT.

Also, if a kid has some issues, they often have other issues which don't neatly fit into a diagnosis, but still could benefit from therapy. What schooling issues other than handwriting is the OT looking at?

 

I don't blame you for being leery if the OT is pushing enrolling him in school. That would not sit well with me either. Many therapists are young and haven't had children and often don't have a well rounded idea of what is within the realm of normal childhood development behaviorally and in areas of maturation which the published norms have not addressed.

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My son's therapy group wasn't too keen on homeschooling, but it seemed like they wanted me to have the school district pick up the tab. I suspected they charged the district higher than they charged me. His actual therapist was very helpful in creating a sensory diet that we could do at home, and she worked out things that would help him settle down to work. Since we could do this at home, we could eventually cut down on the visits. We worked together for a few months, and now we just do it ourselves. Dana

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