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Jeana

For those using Singapore Math, in your opinion...

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Is it enough just to do the standards ed or US ed by itself and nothing else. Or do you need to use the Intensive practice or Challenging Word Problem books as well? I am doing standards ed with ds (6) and US ed. 4a with dd (10). Also, would my dd be considered behind because she is in 4a and not in 5a and 5 b this year? Thanks guys, Jeana

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I have found that it is not enough for my son simply because he enjoys being challenged in math. If that were not the case, then I think it would probably be enough. When I first started off I only used the basic books and found we were moving too quickly through them. I wanted to flesh things out and make it more challenging.

 

I don't think being in 4a puts her behind.

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I just use them, but then I add drills--lots of drills, and "real" math throughout just by doing things around the house, farm, shop garden etc. My ds is 10--4th grade, but just started 3a. I know he is behind, but he has a LD that was just found a year ago. HTH

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I use the whole pile-o-books, but not on the same day. For my kids it isn't enough to see it once so we do a lesson and then a week or so later we do some of the extras to review and reinforce.

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This was all my boys used and they always scored very well on the American Math contest and are coping with Life of Fred math at high school level very well.

My boys started Singapore when they were 7 and 9 - and they were always 'behind' as the book numbering went (eg they'd be in 5th grade and on book 4A. But - as I said, they top scored in American Math contest in our homeschool group - so they were not behind in math at all.

There is no need to do pre-algebra after Singapore - so that means you have longer to finish up to 6B.

My youngest has done various supplements (LOF, CHallenge Problems and Miquon) because she goes so fast through Singapore - and is ahead as the 'numbers' go.

Meryl

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We use IP and CWP, and find it helps very much to have those resources when needing to reinforce certain concepts. Our day is fairly heavy in the math department, though, because I wanted to make sure my kids mastered the concepts behind the math. With the advent of flashmaster in our house, drill has become a non-issue.

 

HTH,

Susan

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would my dd be considered behind because she is in 4a and not in 5a and 5 b this year? Thanks guys, Jeana

 

Jeana,

 

In Singapore, where this curriculum was developed and used, kids begin first grade in January, when they're already 7. They used the Primary Math 1A and 1B that year. So... if a Singaporean child turned 10 at any time after January of 2009, then, she'd be in 3rd grade this year and using 3A and 3B. Their school year ends about now, so she would just be finishing up 3B.

 

If the child was 10 before January of this year, she'd be finishing up 4B this month.

 

Here in the US, people use Singapore's Primary Math in all SORTS of ways, so all bets are off. :D (The only measuring stick would be what YOUR dd was ready for.)

 

Hope that helps.

:)

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Thanks everyone for your help and suggestions. Especially to Susan for the flashmaster idea. I bought one immediately. Thanks, Jeana

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