Jump to content

Menu

s/o Autism/Asperger's recommendations for non-parents


Recommended Posts

The Boy Scout troop that we are with has a scout with Asperger's. We as leaders are trying to work out a good balance for him as a scout that treats him where he is, but also helps him to develop scouting skills.

 

Most of the adults in the troop don't have much experience with kids outside the main stream and are finding this scout to be a bit of a puzzle. We are working with his parents to try to figure out triggers and accomodations so that we aren't frustrating him, other scouts or the leaders unnecesarily (ie, by asking him to do things that are beyond him or in ways that confuse him).

 

Does anyone have book or website recommendations that would give insight for the non-parents around autistic/Asperger's syndrome kids? Something written with the teacher/coach/scout leader in mind?

Edited by Sebastian (a lady)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, as a scout leader with asperger's and with add/adhd... LOL

 

What we do is plan the year, list all activities and goals. Then meet individually with the parents, tell them how and what you're going to be doing, and work together with a plan. BE VERY SPECIFIC. THe parents can also work at home with the child to reinforce/prepare the child so that they are able to perform tasks.

 

The more organized you are, the better.

The more of a structure you keep, the better.

THe more flexible you are, the better. :D

NO TWO KIDS are alike, especially with aspergers.

 

Also, if parents aren't going to be around, make sure the child has the right to contact their parent at any time. If they are having trouble communicating a problem, they need to be able to call a parent -- it does save alot of problems.

 

Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, as a scout leader with asperger's and with add/adhd... LOL

 

What we do is plan the year, list all activities and goals. Then meet individually with the parents, tell them how and what you're going to be doing, and work together with a plan. BE VERY SPECIFIC. THe parents can also work at home with the child to reinforce/prepare the child so that they are able to perform tasks.

 

The more organized you are, the better.

The more of a structure you keep, the better.

THe more flexible you are, the better. :D

NO TWO KIDS are alike, especially with aspergers.

 

Also, if parents aren't going to be around, make sure the child has the right to contact their parent at any time. If they are having trouble communicating a problem, they need to be able to call a parent -- it does save alot of problems.

 

Good luck!

 

As long as you make the group a welcoming and accepting place for the child, I think that will really help with year long goals for medals or badges. Socially, you will see quirky behavior and yes, no Aspie child is the same. Be patient with teaching (they may interrupt often) and be supportive. Ask the parents what their goals are for their child. My child is high functioning (borderline) Asperger's. We've done AWANA, 4H and other clubs with no problems. But we do clue in the leader what limitations son has (i.e. sounds, smells, etc). Try not to look at the entire year... but one step at a time. You can do it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think working with the parents is the best thing you can do. Asperger's can look different in each child. The severity will vary between children as well. I'm always disappointed when another parent of an Aspie tries to keep them all equal. I've gotten that 'my Aspie can do such and such so yours should be able to as well' attitude. It's heart-breaking actually. Reading about Aspergers can be helpful, but no one knows their Aspie like a parent.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The advice to keep things structured and yet flexible is important, even if it does seem to contradict itself :).

 

Many aspies have anxiety issues. Since it took ME several years to get a good idea of where my son's breaking point is, I would suggest asking the parents about their child's signals. If/when he shows those signs, it would probably be a good idea to let him take a break. Preferably in a pre-planned spot when possible.

 

Most libraries have Tony Attwood's "Asperger's Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals". It's a relatively small book with very little medical/technical jargon, and has been my favorite title since 2003. And I've read a LOT of Asperger's books!

Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my co-op students is newly diagnosed with Asperger's. His mom loaned me a great little booklet to read that explains his issues in very simple terms. The info was similar to that on the website someone else posted, but it was in a very easy to read, illustrated format. It would be perfect to have a few of the other kids in the group read it -- particularly those boys who are most likely to lead the others with their example of how they deal with the things that come up. I don't remember the name of the book -- something like "I Have Asperger's". It was written in first person.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...