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We're gluten-free and although I do enjoy my chocolate, I don't include it with our meals :)

 

Our diet is based on plenty of grass-fed ground beef, turkey, whole roasted chicken, bone-broths, beans, veggies, and fruits. Snacks are whole fat goat cheese, goat's milk yogurt, dried fruits mixed with nuts, and rice cakes spread with peanut butter, hard-boiled eggs, etc.

 

It's actually pretty simple when you think in terms of nothing that comes out of a bag or package (at least, at this point, we've been doing this for years).

 

Breakfasts:

Goat's milk yourt with berries

avocado/banana/almond butter smoothies, often w/coconut milk

Rice cakes w/almond butter or walnut or peanut butter spread (I do try to limit peanut butter just because it isn't as good for you as the others)

Homemade gluten-free pancakes with maple syrup and fruit

 

Lunch:

Nori sheets filled with brown rice and avocado w/cucumber and tamari

Deli meats on rice bread w/hummus

Deli meat roll-ups with cucumbers/carrots and hummus and whole-fat goat's cheese

Rice cakes w/almond butter

Homemade chicken bone broth with rice noodles or brown rice, fire-roasted tomatoes, black beans, shredded chicken

Left-overs from dinner

 

Snacks:

Goat's milk cheese

yogurt

nuts/berries

 

Dinner:

Stuffed Cabbange and beef soup

Chilli

Minnestrone w/ bown rice noodles

Chicken stir-fry w/ sesame oil and coconut oil served over brown rice or rice noodles

Chicken drumsticks served on a bed of veggies like onion/carrot/zuchinni

Fish tacos w/corn tortillas, black beans, coconut rice

 

There are a lot of others, I can link websites like this if you're interested.

 

The key for us is to include a lot of good quality fats. Olive oil and coconut oil are great, as is real butter and avocados. You will not feel deprived. It sounds like my diet would make me fat, but I cannot keep the weight on and I have plenty of energy.

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Breakfasts: sweet potatoes and fruit; whole grain rice cereal with rice milk; generally I eat lunch or dinner leftovers or no breakfast

 

I generally make extra for lunch and have the same thing for dinner since it takes a while to cook this way, I lightly fry up lunch for dinner.

 

Lunch and Dinner:

 

stir fry

 

baked chicken over chopped up potatoes, carrots and celery with a bit of olive oil and either italian seasoning or garlic/salt/pepper/paprika, bake at 350 for about 2 hours, covered with foil except for last 20 to 30 minutes. You can also make a gravy with the drippings with oat flour or rice flour if you wish

 

fry up ground turkey (93%), add chopped veggies, add 1 1/2 cups rice and 3 cups water, boil, simmer for 45 minutes.

 

BBQ served with veggies, a salad, and brown rice/sweet potatoes/teff flour pancakes/oat flour pancakes/potatoes

 

Use leftover BBQ meat to make a salad and/or fajitas w/ corn tortillas

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We're gluten-free and although I do enjoy my chocolate, I don't include it with our meals :)

 

 

There are a lot of others, I can link websites like this if you're interested.

.

 

I would love to see your list of websites. I try searching but I'm never sure which ones are the good ones. I have a question about your pancakes. How do you make those?

 

I don't think I can give up chocolate either. I used to not like dark chocolate but am now getting a taste for it.

 

Kelly

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  • 4 years later...

Due to my husband's health issues and my kids' various allergies, we basically eat Paleo (no grains, refined sugars, dairy, soy, legumes-our kids do eat peanuts though). We've been eating this way for over six months, but we were gluten-free for several years before that. I even have a gluten-free blog.

 

For breakfast we typically eat a lean meat and eggs with a vegetable or two thrown in. I typically make things like crustless quiches with loads of veggies, scrambled eggs with canned salmon, etc. A couple days a week we might make something like Paleo pancakes (with almond flour) or a granola type cereal I make with nuts and dried fruits.

 

For lunch we eat a lot of salads with easy homemade dressings (citrus, olive oil, and a bit of honey), leftover meats, and plenty of fruits and veggies.

 

For dinner we eat stripped down, basic foods. Roast chicken, grilled steaks, hamburgers with no buns and sweet potato fries, stew, salmon, etc. I actually find dinner super easy to cook now. I don't really need recipes. I just make a meat and prepare a veggie or two and fruit for dessert. We do eat a lot more vegetables now!

 

For snacks, we eat a lot of nuts and dried fruits. We have found a few bars, like Lara Bars and Cliff Kit bars that we keep on hand for emergency situations when we might be out and hungry.

 

I replaced all my oils for cooking to olive oil, and all my baking to coconut oil. But honesty we bake a lot less. Almond flour is super expensive, so although you can make cookies and cakes, I don't do it very often. I still use honey and coconut sugar, but not in large quantities.

 

We started this diet as a three month trial and we've stuck with it. We all feel a lot better, but it is expensive. 

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I've gotten some good recipes from this website.  http://paleomg.com/

 

These meatballs are to die for. I have never been able to find a meatball recipe I liked in 30 years of trying, until this one.  My ground beef was not grass fed, and I made the almond flour in my vitamix.  http://paleomg.com/leftovers-curry-meatballs/

 

 

 

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We were gf for a year and a half due to a misdiagnosis, but I got relatively good at paleo-ish meal planning. 

 

Roast whole chicken with roasted sweet potatoes, green veggie

 

Risotto (using stock from chicken carcass) with leeks, butternut squash chunks, bacon, thyme, and Parmesan cheese

 

Spaghetti sauce (homemade or bottled) with ground beef, served over spaghetti squash, green salad

 

Loaded baked potatoes (cheese, chives, sour cream, bacon...)

 

Salmon with a fruity glaze, green veggie, quinoa or rice salad

 

Slow cooked black beans on fried corn tortillas with whatever tostada toppings you like- salsa, sour cream, lettuce, etc.

 

Burgers with all the trimmings but the bun (avocado, onion, lettuce, etc.), fried or oven fried potatoes, green veggie

 

I always made enough to have lunch for at least one day... too hard to come up with gf lunches!

 

Breakfast was rotated between gf oatmeal with an apple grated into it and cinnamon, scrambled eggs or omelets, yogurt.  Always wtih a fruit. 

 

Snack was usually fruit and dairy. 

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I have moved to a gluten free, dairy free, soy free, caffeine free, sugar free and fairly low carbohydrate (I am a type 1 diabetic too) diet to try to prevent PMDD - for breakfast mostly I eat eggs with vegetables (usually left overs from the night before), lunch is a salad with some protein (tuna or chicken usually) and supper is meat with vegetables again. I add fruit to anything if I need more carbohydrates and we switch supper and lunch around if needed. On occassion I will eat gluten free cereal (which is high in carbs) and tea with coconut milk is a staple. We do also eat brown rice and potatoes but again only sometimes because they are relatively high in carbohydrates and push my sugars up or need too much insulin. We also eat a lot of nuts and seeds as snacks. 

 

I have found going totally raw has decreased my food bill - it is when I add gluten free foods like pasta or use the gluten free flours that the cost goes up - simply having fewer snack foods that were rubbish anyway means we eat less and are full more quickly. And we have a relatively cheap fruit and vegetable store around the corner. I also make my own coconut milk and it lands up 1/8 of the price of store bought coconut milk/cream.

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Breakfast:

 

- smoothies made of orange juice, silken tofu, frozen peaches, frozen blackberries, frozen kale

- savory waffles*

- oatmeal or Farina, fresh fruit

- gluten-free muesli in plain yogurt with bananas

- rice cakes with thinly sliced apples and peanut butter

- eggs scrambled with salsa

- roesti

- fried spiced tofu

 

 

Dinner:

 

- chicken soup with rice

- chili, corn fritters

- fresh spinach tossed with glazed walnuts, avocado, and bleu cheese in a raspberry vinaigrette

- pot roast with root vegetables

- spinach pancakes, baked potatoes with green onions & bacon

- raw zuccini shredded and tossed with a cashew sauce

- fried cubed tofu, broccoli and rice noodles tossed with a peanut butter, soy sauce & ginger mixture

- lentils monastery style

 

We rotate through these dinners and another six or seven that are less healthy but more kid-pleasing. On nights when we're not doing food I can eat, I have leftovers, or just one portion of the meal. For lunches and snacks we always eat either leftovers or raw fruits & veggies.

 

* To make my savory waffles, I use a standard waffle recipe but sub in 1/2 part Bob's GF flour, 1/2 part almond flour, either soy or goat milk depending on what we have, plus I add real yeast, spoonfuls of ground clove, and McCormick's chai seasoning blend. The flavor of the real yeast, the generous portion of ground cloves, and the protein-heaviness of the almond flour, makes a single waffle a hearty and satisfying breakfast all by itself. But sometimes for a treat we skim the cream off the top of a can of cold coconut milk and whip it and add that to the waffles. Coconut milk whips just like regular cream.

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I eat more starchy vegetables and beans when I'm not eating flours and gluten and sweets. I never go grain free as there are vitamins in whole grains that I don't think are in anything else. I always at least sprinkle a little brown rice, wheat berries, or other whole grain over a salad or chopped fruit and nuts a few times a week.

 

I make a lot of stewed and pot roasted chicken/meat along with those starchy vegetables.

 

I don't like my raw fruits and vegetables cold. I eat them room temperature, or slightly warm.

 

I have a LOT of stomach pain and sometimes, especially in the past, I've been put on some restrictive diets.

 

Other times I just cannot eat animal products. Seeing a captive animal can trigger my PTSD sometimes and I just cannot be a party to any living creature being held captive and having no free will. I can't afford specialty vegan mock foods, so I end out on a very restricted diet, till that passes.

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I eat more starchy vegetables and beans when I'm not eating flours and gluten and sweets. I never go grain free as there are vitamins in whole grains that I don't think are in anything else. I always at least sprinkle a little brown rice, wheat berries, or other whole grain over a salad or chopped fruit and nuts a few times a week.

 

Some research suggests that the body actually needs MORE vitamins when eating a diet high in carbohydrates. Also, it's the other way around--some nutrients can only come from animal products, but I don't know of any that can only be found in grains. 

 

We're sugar free (with an occasional piece of dark chocolate), mostly grain free, and low carb. Most meals are just meat and veggies, right now in the form of soup. Depending on what we put in it, it equals out to $3-4 per meal for a family of seven.

 

We also like eggs: scrambled, fried, green eggs (fried with pesto and feta), quiche, egg salad, and any other way we can think of to cook them.

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I have moved to a gluten free, dairy free, soy free, caffeine free, sugar free and fairly low carbohydrate (I am a type 1 diabetic too) diet to try to prevent PMDD - for breakfast mostly I eat eggs with vegetables (usually left overs from the night before), lunch is a salad with some protein (tuna or chicken usually) and supper is meat with vegetables again. I add fruit to anything if I need more carbohydrates and we switch supper and lunch around if needed. On occassion I will eat gluten free cereal (which is high in carbs) and tea with coconut milk is a staple. We do also eat brown rice and potatoes but again only sometimes because they are relatively high in carbohydrates and push my sugars up or need too much insulin. We also eat a lot of nuts and seeds as snacks. 

 

I have found going totally raw has decreased my food bill - it is when I add gluten free foods like pasta or use the gluten free flours that the cost goes up - simply having fewer snack foods that were rubbish anyway means we eat less and are full more quickly. And we have a relatively cheap fruit and vegetable store around the corner. I also make my own coconut milk and it lands up 1/8 of the price of store bought coconut milk/cream.

 

I have so much to learn.  Why did I not realize that I could be making my own coconut milk???  :confused1:

 

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Some research suggests that the body actually needs MORE vitamins when eating a diet high in carbohydrates. Also, it's the other way around--some nutrients can only come from animal products, but I don't know of any that can only be found in grains.

 

We're sugar free (with an occasional piece of dark chocolate), mostly grain free, and low carb. Most meals are just meat and veggies, right now in the form of soup. Depending on what we put in it, it equals out to $3-4 per meal for a family of seven.

 

We also like eggs: scrambled, fried, green eggs (fried with pesto and feta), quiche, egg salad, and any other way we can think of to cook them.

Kathy Jo, years ago I was using a food storage calculator designed to predict nutritional deficiencies in a food storage plan. Now, I remember I was eating vegan. Those grain vitamins are probably also in animal products, too. I just remember at the time nothing but grains would fix the predicted nutritional deficits.

 

I really need to read, not skim, your Paleo book!

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I eat a gluten free/ dairy free diet.  I rarely eat sugar.  I do have dark chocolate now and then.  My kids are not gluten or dairy free, so their meals are a little different.

 

B- eggs, green veggies (swiss chard or spinach usually), roasted potatoes.  Sometimes I buy gluten free bread, but not usually.  Coconut oil for eggs.

kids will have the same or yogurt and fruit.  I often make granola with gluten free oats.  that has honey though.

 

L- salad with protein- meat, tuna, or salmon usually.  Or left overs.  

 

D- protein- tonight was drumsticks.  

     starch- rice, potatoes, sweet potatoes, rarely gluten free pasta

     veggies- 

 

It's pretty easy to be gluten free and sugar free.  We don't do pre packaged snacks.  We might make popcorn for a snack.  The kids also eat cheese sticks, yogurt, rarely gluten free crackers with peanut butter, fruit, or veggies with hummus.  We don't bake sweets unless it's a holiday.  When they eat yogurt, they do add honey.  Occasionally I will make gluten free pancakes.  I just sub out oat flour made from oats that I put in my blender.  I do this for cookies too.  But again, those have sugar and are rare.

 

Dinners also might be chili or soup.  I keep it simple.  Whole cooked chicken with potatoes and carrots is an easy one too.  Then I make a stock with the bones and have soup later in the week.  I use to make bread to go with it, but now I don't.  It's ok once you get use to no wheat.  you don't miss it so much after a while.

 

Good luck.  :)

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oh, I forgot to mention that spaghetti sauce (the kind with meat) is SO delicious over roasted broccoli or asparagus.  It's one of my favorite meals.  It is also delicious over a baked potato, as is chili.  My dh likes it over polenta.  And it's so easy to make your own sauce.  I just brown some ground beef, add canned tomatoes (just plain, no sugar or anything added), add some wine if I remember, salt, basil if I have it, yum!  I don't add carrots or onions because ds can't enjoy it with those.   :)

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Our diet is based on plenty of grass-fed ground beef, turkey, whole roasted chicken, bone-broths, beans, veggies, and fruits. Snacks are whole fat goat cheese, goat's milk yogurt, dried fruits mixed with nuts, and rice cakes spread with peanut butter, hard-boiled eggs, etc.

It's actually pretty simple when you think in terms of nothing that comes out of a bag or package (at least, at this point, we've been doing this for years).

Breakfasts:
Goat's milk yourt with berries
avocado/banana/almond butter smoothies, often w/coconut milk
Rice cakes w/almond butter or walnut or peanut butter spread (I do try to limit peanut butter just because it isn't as good for you as the others)
Homemade gluten-free pancakes with maple syrup and fruit

 

____________

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Our diet is based on plenty of grass-fed ground beef, turkey, whole roasted chicken, bone-broths, beans, veggies, and fruits. Snacks are whole fat goat cheese, goat's milk yogurt, dried fruits mixed with nuts, and rice cakes spread with peanut butter, hard-boiled eggs, etc.

 

It's actually pretty simple when you think in terms of nothing that comes out of a bag or package (at least, at this point, we've been doing this for years).

 

Breakfasts:

Goat's milk yourt with berries

avocado/banana/almond butter smoothies, often w/coconut milk

Rice cakes w/almond butter or walnut or peanut butter spread (I do try to limit peanut butter just because it isn't as good for you as the others)

Homemade gluten-free pancakes with maple syrup and fruit

---------

GuL

Welcome to the forum chal4oye! :party:

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Kathy Jo, years ago I was using a food storage calculator designed to predict nutritional deficiencies in a food storage plan. Now, I remember I was eating vegan. Those grain vitamins are probably also in animal products, too. I just remember at the time nothing but grains would fix the predicted nutritional deficits.

 

I really need to read, not skim, your Paleo book!

 

Gary Taubes mentions the research in Good Calories, Bad Calories on page 325. I wish Amazon would let me loan GCBC. It was one of the shockers for me when I started studying Paleo/Primal/low-carb diets. 

 

Vilhjalmur Stefansson and Karsten Anderson and the study that was done concerning them is interesting reading. You can read Stefansson's own paper from 1935 here. (Note: I know nothing about this site except that they've reprinted Stefansson's paper.)

 

Of course, all of this is tricky today because those people weren't eating CAFO animals. 

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corn on the cob

broccoli with cheese

fried fish

 

chicken, baked

black beans

apple slices

 

veggie burgers (homemade burgers on store-bought healthy bread)

salad (lettuce plus...)

fruit salad

 

veggie fajitas

 

chicken sandwiches (grilled boneless chicken breast on store-bought healthy bread)

roasted potatoes

carrots

 

stewed meat with veggies

 

Triscuits with pizza sauce and cheese

popcorn (homemade with salt and butter

 

 

I could have come up with healthier meals, but I wanted to post normal meals that average kids will want to eat.  I would use a small percentage of ingredients  which are not whole foods.  I would use white flour tortillas, and white flour for the fish's breading.  I'd also use store-bought salad dressing, pizza sauce and ketchup.

 

 

 

 

 

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My husband and I are doing a Whole30 in January (really strict Paleo). I just posted the menu plan for the whole month with all three meals I made for it. I'm trying to keep it as simple and as close to our usual way of eating (which is already cooked-from-scratch, meat-and-potatoes type). Eating vegetables at breakfast still seems weird to me, but maybe after 30 days I'll get used to it. :)

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My husband and I are doing a Whole30 in January (really strict Paleo). I just posted the menu plan for the whole month with all three meals I made for it. I'm trying to keep it as simple and as close to our usual way of eating (which is already cooked-from-scratch, meat-and-potatoes type). Eating vegetables at breakfast still seems weird to me, but maybe after 30 days I'll get used to it. :)

 

I eat veggies most mornings for breakfast. I always feel better when I do. I have a diabetic friend now that will eat cucumbers slices for breakfast if I put them on the table.

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(I shouldn't be on the computer right now, but I just had to order my Great Courses DVD's!! Happy New Year to me! And to everyone else. :) )

 

I plan our menus around protein.

 

Monday - whole chicken

Tuesday - beef roast/stew, very rarely, lamb (add bone broth and gelatin)

Wednesday - fish

Thursday - chicken or turkey parts or ground (ie. meatballs, thighs, etc.)

Friday - bunless burgers, either beef, buffalo or lamb (add liver)

Sat - leftovers or a soup that I can triple to feed my freezer

Sun - grilled meat with some sort of shellfish

 

Now, take each night, and prepare the meat according to your needs. Have a database of recipes for each type of protein. Most nights, meals are very simple and can be prepared in the crock pot. Chicken and potatoes in crock pot, fish in coconut milk, roast with mushrooms and balsamic. EASY is key.

 

Add a seasonal veggie that takes 10 minutes to prepare.

 

Roast a root veggie: baked yams, sweet potatoes, red potatoes, russetts, or occasionally, white rice.

 

Add a lot of fat: butter or coconut oil

 

Easy.

 

Leftovers are always for lunch. If we have to leave the house, the leftovers are cold and usually put over a salad. Add lots of fat to your salad - meat, olives, avocado, cheese, nuts, etc.

 

Snacks are fruit and nuts, occasional cheese if you want it...easy stuff that the kids can get themselves.

 

Breakfast is the hardest, though. Unfortunately, no more cereal or bagels. You have to prep some meat for breakfast. I usually have my husband grill some extra meat to slice up and put in the fridge. We add it to our eggs and veggies. Add some fruit (banana, apple, etc.) and you are set. Or breakfast sausages, half an avocado and some fruit.

 

Look up The Perfect Health Diet. http://perfecthealthdiet.com/

 

It's Paleo, but with starches so you don't feel like you are starving. If you are trying to lose weight, low carb definitely helps. If you are pregnant, nursing or have growing kids, the carbs help keep you going. The fat, too.

 

I was a vegetarian/vegan for over 13 years. I switched to gf/sugar free, then eventually Paleo for the last 5 years or so. Never felt better in my life!! The key is to keep it as simple as possible...I mean really simple, or you will burn out. Get your kids to help, too. They can scramble eggs and wash dishes!! :)

 

Beware: this will be a dent in your pocketbook if you aren't careful. But going to the doctor's office costs a lot, too. :)

 

Good luck!!

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