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yvonne

Is Memoria Press Catholic?

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Anyone know if Memoria Press is Catholic based?

 

I just poked around a little on their site, but didn't find anything quickly, so I thought I'd ask here.

 

yvonne

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Anyone know if Memoria Press is Catholic based?

 

I just poked around a little on their site, but didn't find anything quickly, so I thought I'd ask here.

 

yvonne

 

Technically, yes. Their materials are not overly Catholic in flavor, but they are overtly Christian. I am an evangelical Protestant and have used their materials for years without much trouble at all. I don't know that a non-Christian would be comfortable using them, though.

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Thanks, Kinsa. I'm Protestant and I really like their materials, too. I heard on another site that they were Catholic, but it never even occurred to me that they were from their materials. I still like their materials, though! :)

 

yvonne

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I don't think the company is Catholic. There isn't anything on the website to indicate that. The Latin series does have some Catholic prayers and such in it though, not anything that would offend a protestant though.

 

I read through some of the bios and noticed a graduate from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. There were no priests, sisters, or other graduates from a Catholic school listed. That should be a good clue as to the denominational lean of the company.

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Anyone know if Memoria Press is Catholic based?

 

I just poked around a little on their site, but didn't find anything quickly, so I thought I'd ask here.

 

yvonne

 

Cheryl Lowe is, yes. Martin Cothran is Presbyterian. And there are students/former students from Southern who teach and write for them. They are "orthodox" (small o) Christian. And try to draw from historic Christianity which most major strands of Christianity should be comfortable with. "Mere Christianity" would be the term. :)

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I will have to retract my answer. After looking through the Highlands School website, I see nothing that indicates it is a Catholic school. Quite the contrary, actually.

 

I had heard that they were of a Catholic persuasion, but now I question that assertion.

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The prayers and hymns may be considered Catholic today, but they're the shared heritage of Protestants as well. Most of them were written well before 1517 and Wittenberg.

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I'm using their Christian Studies (haven't started teaching it yet) and it doesn't seem to be Catholic. I chose this Bible study program after reading the reviews here and most people using it were protestant, as am I. I've often wondered if as a company their were Catholic though, so hopefully we'll get a final answer from someone.

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I'm using their Christian Studies (haven't started teaching it yet) and it doesn't seem to be Catholic. I chose this Bible study program after reading the reviews here and most people using it were protestant, as am I. I've often wondered if as a company their were Catholic though, so hopefully we'll get a final answer from someone.

 

Honest question, would it matter if they were a Catholic company (not sure what that means, owners being Catholic doesn't mean the company is part of the church)?

 

My sister-in-law worked for them for 3 years. My brother has taught one of their online classes and is working on a study guide for them. My SIL's brother-in-law (her sister's husband) is a teacher for them. I already answered about the denominations of several those very involved with the company/school. Cheryl Lowe is Catholic. If I recall correctly one of her sons is Methodist. Martin Cothran is an elder in the PCA. And there are several people connected with Southern seminary who teach or work for MP.

 

But if you have the program, you've looked through it and find no doctrinal issues that you're uncomfortable with (which I can understand, I'm not likely to use an overtly Arminian/Dispensational theology program any time soon.), then does it matter that much if the company has predominantly Catholic authors/teachers?

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Honest question, would it matter if they were a Catholic company (not sure what that means, owners being Catholic doesn't mean the company is part of the church)?

 

My sister-in-law worked for them for 3 years. My brother has taught one of their online classes and is working on a study guide for them. My SIL's brother-in-law (her sister's husband) is a teacher for them. I already answered about the denominations of several those very involved with the company/school. Cheryl Lowe is Catholic. If I recall correctly one of her sons is Methodist. Martin Cothran is an elder in the PCA. And there are several people connected with Southern seminary who teach or work for MP.

 

But if you have the program, you've looked through it and find no doctrinal issues that you're uncomfortable with (which I can understand, I'm not likely to use an overtly Arminian/Dispensational theology program any time soon.), then does it matter that much if the company has predominantly Catholic authors/teachers?

 

It doesn't matter to me. I will evaluate everything--"secular", "Christian" (any denomination), etc.--before I use it with my children. I have friends/acquaintances from many backgrounds and beliefs, and I find inspiration and resources in many different places.

Edited by Amie

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No, they are not.

 

The authors of their material come from many backgrounds: Orthodox, Protestant, Catholic.

 

I asked Martin Cothran's wife about this "Catholic controversy" when I saw her at a Classical Conversations event. She said it is a common question.

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I'm truly curious. What is this "Catholic controversy" of which you speak? Andrew Pudewa is Catholic and he just happened to develop a writing program. I guess I'm confused because it seems like asking if Singapore Math is Buddhist.:confused:

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Traditional Logic has some Catholicism in it, but it's been so many years since my son took it, I can't remember what, exactly, it was. I just remember him wanting to argue theology with the book!

 

Henle is written by monks, (or a monk) and it is decidedly Catholic, but that didn't keep ds from learning Latin well.

 

Although, I will say, they don't include any of the reformers in their Famous Men books (Martin Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, etc)

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I'm truly curious. What is this "Catholic controversy" of which you speak? Andrew Pudewa is Catholic and he just happened to develop a writing program. I guess I'm confused because it seems like asking if Singapore Math is Buddhist.:confused:

 

Or if Wide Guide Spelling Protestant. I wonder if this site is a place Catholics can belong or are just tolerated.

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Henle was not a monk. He was a priest of the Jesuit order, hence the initials S. J. after his name. The Jesuits are a teaching order who founded many universities and high schools. A monk is someone who may or may not be a priest who dedicates his life to prayer and living in community with other monks.

 

Traditional Logic is not Catholic, however, Martin Cothran, as an orthodox Presbyterian has a lot of respect for Augustinian thought. Whatever bit of theology might be in Trad Logic (it's been awhile since I've done it) is not specific to Catholics at all.

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Or if Wide Guide Spelling Protestant. I wonder if this site is a place Catholics can belong or are just tolerated.
:glare: I've always heard it was a GOOD thing to ask questions and find out the facts!

 

It could've been ANY religion that this question was about, it just so happened she'd heard it was Catholic so was wondering if that was so. I don't see anything wrong with asking a question just to know the facts! It probably doesn't matter, because, as she said, she uses it anyway, but it would satisfy her curiosity. There's nothing wrong with that, is there? :confused:

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Although, I will say, they don't include any of the reformers in their Famous Men books (Martin Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, etc)

 

They didn't write those books, just re-published them. The originals I found on the Baldwin Project didn't include the people you mentioned either, so it isn't because they edited them out.

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They didn't write those books, just re-published them. The originals I found on the Baldwin Project didn't include the people you mentioned either, so it isn't because they edited them out.

 

I realize that. I was pointing out a fact. Reformers are not in those books.

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I realize that. I was pointing out a fact. Reformers are not in those books.

 

Sorry! I misunderstood your point. I thought you were pointing out the Catholic aspects of their various books.

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Sorry! I misunderstood your point. I thought you were pointing out the Catholic aspects of their various books.

 

No, I was just bringing up points that people might not realize. I love the FM series with the teacher guides and student books and assumed wrongly that reformers would be there, but found out they weren't. That did send me on a search and discovered that the reformers weren't in the originals, either. I probably should have expanded on that earlier. ;)

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Honest question, would it matter if they were a Catholic company (not sure what that means, owners being Catholic doesn't mean the company is part of the church)?

 

My sister-in-law worked for them for 3 years. My brother has taught one of their online classes and is working on a study guide for them. My SIL's brother-in-law (her sister's husband) is a teacher for them. I already answered about the denominations of several those very involved with the company/school. Cheryl Lowe is Catholic. If I recall correctly one of her sons is Methodist. Martin Cothran is an elder in the PCA. And there are several people connected with Southern seminary who teach or work for MP.

 

But if you have the program, you've looked through it and find no doctrinal issues that you're uncomfortable with (which I can understand, I'm not likely to use an overtly Arminian/Dispensational theology program any time soon.), then does it matter that much if the company has predominantly Catholic authors/teachers?

 

It doesn't matter to me if the company is Catholic but if I'm going to buy a Bible curriculum, as a Presbyterian, I'd rather it not have a Catholic bent to it. Instead, it is just pretty straight forward Bible instruction which is what I wanted. Other than that, I was just curious as to whether or not they were Catholic. I think they have so many nice materials. I'm also using their D'Aulaires Greek Myths guide this year.

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I'm truly curious. What is this "Catholic controversy" of which you speak? Andrew Pudewa is Catholic and he just happened to develop a writing program. I guess I'm confused because it seems like asking if Singapore Math is Buddhist.:confused:

 

The "Catholic controversy" I refer to is people avoiding their products because they think the company is Catholic.

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Some loveliness for you, to chase the zombies away:

 

 

"The Castle Builder"

 

A gentle boy, with soft and silken locks,
A dreamy boy, with brown and tender eyes,
A castle-builder, with his wooden blocks,
And towers that touch imaginary skies.

 

A fearless rider on his father's knee,
An eager listener unto stories told
At the Round Table of the nursery,
Of heroes and adventures manifold.

 

There will be other towers for thee to build;
There will be other steeds for thee to ride;
There will be other legends, and all filled
With greater marvels and more glorified.

 

Build on, and make thy castles high and fair,
Rising and reaching upward to the skies;
Listening to voices in the upper air,
Nor lose thy simple faith in mysteries.

 

-- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Unitarian, but who's counting?   ;))

Edited by ElizaG
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I know this is a zombie thread, but I'd probably look for an imprimatur. I don't know if they put that in all Catholic books, but it was in something I ordered from Seton and my dad pointed it out to me.

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Yes, zombie thread,

 

BUT

 

just in case anyone is actually curious, I did call Memoria Press once and ask about their religious affiliation.  I was told that they do not have a particular denominational slant, but were intentionally made to be "Trinitarian Christian."  The staff member I spoke to said they have Catholics, Episcopalians, Baptists, and other denominations represented on their staff. 

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This one is a bit less accessible - my children weren't drawn to it on their first hearing - but it's growing on me.   :001_smile:

 

 

From "The Princess" :  "The Splendour Falls on Castle Walls"

 

         The splendour falls on castle walls
                And snowy summits old in story:
         The long light shakes across the lakes,
                And the wild cataract leaps in glory.
Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying,
Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.

 
         O hark, O hear! how thin and clear,
                And thinner, clearer, farther going!
         O sweet and far from cliff and scar
                The horns of Elfland faintly blowing!
Blow, let us hear the purple glens replying:
Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.

 
         O love, they die in yon rich sky,
                They faint on hill or field or river:
         Our echoes roll from soul to soul,
                And grow for ever and for ever.
Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying,
And answer, echoes, answer, dying, dying, dying.
 
 
-- Alfred, Lord Tennyson (thoroughly Victorian C. of E., prone to religious uncertainties)
 
 
Coincidentally, I was just serenaded by my first grader playing on a bugle made from half a banana.    :D

 

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