Jump to content

Menu

Just exactly what is a soccer mom?


Recommended Posts

I know the term means the women who have their children on soccer teams which sounds relatively unimpressive in itself but I've heard this term bandied around a lot in the media. Apparently, the soccer moms voted for Clinton and now they are supposed to be for the Republic candidate this time round. They're mostly stay at home moms and are in the middle or upper middle class. They're supposed to have a lot of purchasing power. But is there more to this stereotype than I'm seeing? On the stereotypical home schooler thread, the soccer home school moms were contrasted to the "stereotypical home school moms with long hair in denim jumpers with many children". Why would that be? We've had a Amish-like family have a couple of their teenage sons be on our church school soccer team. But would that family have gone as far as to have the boys play in a public soccer league? I'm not sure. What do you think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It has MUCH less to do with soccer itself, and more to do with the average middle/upper middle class SAHM's who take their kids back and forth to all the things kids these days are *supposed* to be doing. They join the PTO/PTA etc.

 

I think it's the modern version of the "stereotypical '50's housewife."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought it was just the new 21st century, PC term for a housewife.

 

Agreed, and that's what I meant when I used the term "soccer mom"... a more mainstream middle class average person, not the stereotypical denim skirt long-hair like myself, LOL. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They drive Suburbans or Expeditions, even though they only have one or two children. The children are watching a DVD play in the car as they are driven home from school, even though it's only a ten minute drive. The kids have so many outside activities, and so much homework, there is little family time at home. These are the moms who relate to those commercials where the parents are celebrating that their kids are going back to school. Their nails and hair look nice, and their clothes are casual, but nice.

 

Drive by any elementary school in my town when school lets out, and you won't even by able to get through the line of SUV's pulling into the lot.

Michelle T

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And they have cell phone to ear at all times!

 

Yes -- so give them a wide berth. They aren't paying attention to what they are doing *now* because they're too busy planning what they will be doing tomorrow -- or bragging about what they did yesterday.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh dear. Based on this thread I may be a soccer mom but maybe not.

 

SUV? Check. With DVD? HECK NO! We're usually listening to books on CD/ipod. Although today we were listening to The Clash. Do soccer moms know about The Clash?:confused:

 

Casual but nice clothes? Check. Sweater? No. Nice nails? BWAHAHAHAHAHA...umm..no.

 

Cell phone? Check. Latte? Sometimes but more likely a soda (NOT diet).

 

Loves it when kids are back in school? Obviously, this doesn't apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"The Soccer Mom" for Cindy Marsch of Writing Assessment Services. The way she described soccer moms was not only the teenage-type outfits, but also the super-competitive spirit among these moms with their kids. These are the types of mothers, according to my dd, whose kids always have to be "the best" at everything and who get extremely jealous of the children of others who do better.

 

I don't know if this is the "official" description, though!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always hated this generalization. Yes, I drive my kids around. They have played soccer in the past though now no one does due to injuries.They do watch DVDs sometimes but but for longer rides like 1/2 hour minimum. Yes, I have professional hair cuts and dye jobs. No I don't get nails. Yes, I am involved with committees and groups. No, I don't drive SUVs or vans but a nice roomy sedan. No, I don't have one or two kids but I don't have a vanful of kids either. (Two at home, one at college). I homeschool. But the most important difference in the generalizations is that this idea of married moms with kids all voting Democrat is simply untrue. The fact is that married women tend Republican particularly if they are not poor. This election year my most important issues are national security followed closely by economic policy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see now what I'm missing out by not having my kids involved with the public leagues:) I have a couple of friends that come close to the negative stereotype but they mean well. As for the others, our circles just don't intersect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I drive an SUV or a minivan, depending on which one I found the keys for first. Neither has a DVD player. Both have a soccer ball magnet on them and a bag of soccer balls in the back. ;) Both have a "Pray for our Troops" ribbon magnet on them. (I once didn't get pulled over in Macon, Georgia because of that magnet. Then I felt bad because I know he thought I had a DH in Iraq. I do have a DBIL in Iraq, though.)

 

I have two kids who play soccer, and one more who will start next year. The little one will have to wait two more years to play. However, the whole family spends quite a bit of time at soccer each weekend. DH is the coach of both teams. As for other activities, they are involved with chess club, LEGO Robotics, Earth Club, art classes, and music classes. They don't have a lot of homework, because our schools have made it a practice to not give busy work.

 

I do not drive while talking on my cell phone very often. Only when I am in the car alone, and then only to my husband to see what we might want for dinner and to check if soccer practice has been called off because of the weather.

 

I wouldn't know what to order from Starbucks:confused:, although people give me gift cards to Starbucks as thank-you's for volunteering.

 

I have been the PTA treasurer and newsletter person. I do a lot of volunteering for my kids' schools. I think that it is important for each child to have the opportunity to get a great education, no matter how he/she gets it. (Homeschool, private school, public school, whatever.)

 

My family eats dinner together every night. We spend time together after dinner every night playing in the front yard, reading books, watching tv, just messing around, doing art, etc.

 

My family, and most of the neighborhood kids, play soccer or lacrosse or football or some made-up game in our front yard. Our neighborhood has a mix of public, private, and home schooled kids. We all get along and don't get snarky with each other over standardized testing. When we ask each other questions about such things, we are genuinely curious.

 

We have banned HFCS from soccer snacks. Water and fruit is what we have for soccer snacks for both teams. (And orange slices at the half.)

 

I don't think I am highly competitive about my kids. Maybe because I know they are perfect? Just kidding.:) In fact, I hate sitting around the pool in the summer hearing moms drop what books their first grader is reading and that their little Susie made it into the gifted program in third grade.

 

Politically speaking, my biggest concerns in the election are health care, the War in Iraq, and the environment. I think the war tops my list because I have seen how it has changed my DBIL (who is on his third tour in Iraq, and when he gets back he will have been gone for a total of 5 years) and my sister and her kids. Oh, add No Child Gets Ahead to that list, too.

 

I do work as a high school teacher. I love my job. I teach in an at-risk school (over 90% minority and poverty), and many of you would be appalled at the behavior in my classrooms. But there is genuine learning going on. Many of the kids I have in my precalculus class have parents who didn't finish the eighth grade. Yes, they need a lot of support. Yes, I have pregnant teenagers in my classes. I have a cross-dresser. I have gay students.

 

Probably more than you wanted to know. But I am a soccer mom, and you asked...:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is the ladies that were in the pick up line when my ds was in private school. In preschool they all drove matching mini-vans, I kid you not, same van about three different colors between the lot of them. I drove a pick-up truck.

 

In kindergarten they all "upgraded" to giant SUV's while I had proudly paid cash for an old Pontiac Sunbird. At some point I realized I could drive my car under most of their new vehicles and they wouldn't know it. It was shortly after that we decided to homeschool. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And thank you for being brave enough to share. Based on a simple assessment of what this term originally meant, then I am a soccer mom, too.

 

I drive an SUV.

My older son played soccer until he was about 12.

My younger son began playing soccer as soon as they'd let him, about 3, I think.

 

My younger son played on an elite, competitive team that traveled last year, but we have to begin to gear down now because he has club feet and is losing some mobility in his ankles, which prevents his footwork from being what it once was. Others are also beginning to outstrip him in strength, as his calf muscles will never be normal size.....

 

I shy away from bumper stickers on my car that seem to me that they might advertise pridefulness in a particular sport, team, school, etc. I don't think badly of others who have them, I just sort of feel that sometimes it might feel like a snub to others I deal with on a regular basis, so I don't do it.

 

I do know some in my town who live and breath nothing but sports and act as if it's all that matters. For them, it seems to be a determiner of whether your kids are good enough to play with theirs. I'd rather see kids more well-rounded than that. I applaud you for your efforts in that regard.

 

I'm pretty sensitive, due to my younger son, to the fact that some kids have the spirit to play, and want to play, but their bodies simply will not allow them to play, even if folks can't see the reason for that in looking at them. My older son also has lower body weakness, similar to an MD type condition. He was always trailing the pack in running after the ball. We kept trying him in different things until he found that he really loved swimming. This sport has allowances for his lower body problems and has allowed him to even out some of his motor skills issues, as well.

 

I talk on my cell phone more than I should while driving ('cause I don't think I *ever* should) - but I'm always in my car, so that has to happen, sometimes.....

 

I don't do coffee. I love Starbuck's chai, but I can't see springing $3-$6+++ for a simple drink - it sort of takes the fun out of it for me.....

 

Volunteering is part of my life, such that I can't even always identify what I'm involved in at any particular time. I regularly, weekly schedule things for our homeschooling community, influence classes being organized or teach them myself, speak to community progams about offering classes to hser's, etc., etc. I'm leading my son's Webelo I group this year, as there was no other leader when the school year started....

 

My family eats dinner together every night, too, if we're home, LOL..... The boys still wrestle and play with their father. All the boys around us come over and throw football, shoot basketball, kick soccer ball, etc., etc. with us, too.

 

I'm not into competition in any form. It's part of why I try to keep a low profile. I don't want to inspire a competitive or envious feeling in others, either. I don't want others to feel that I have a better car then them, better home than them, more money to spend on eating out, etc., etc. I think that my plain clothes approach has also been a part of trying to just keep a low profile and be plain and simply, me. I enjoy my life very much. I want to keep enjoying it. But at the same time, I don't want it to cause misery for others who come in contact with me on a regular basis. Not sure if that makes any kind of sense to anyone but me.....

 

And I do sit, in the shade, clothed, around the pool sometimes in summer, generally reading or working on my lesson plans, to hear those who teach bashing homeschoolers. So I'm happy that you have a great neighborhood, but it's not so everywhere. There are others in our neighborhood, who know us, etc., who are fine with homeschooling. I also see way too many moms my age and older all decked out in bikinis and jewelry and strutting around making the teenage girls feel badly about themselves. Geesh, why not give them their own time to shine and tone it down a little? I don't know, it just seems like way too much to me....

 

I won't, in general, discuss politics because we really don't change each others minds when we do that and it always just makes someone, somewhere mad.....

 

I applaud you for having the courage and conviction to work in a difficult environment. I hope that you know that even though it may seem that we sometimes bash the regular school system, it's mostly the "system" against which we rail, not those who are trying to work within that system. There may be particular incidents which will raise concerns against individuals within that system, but in general, it's the system that we feel is broken and for many of us, that's why we've chosen to homeschool, instead. Yes, that sort of ganging up can make us seem just as clique-ish and unfriendly as those we're calling soccer moms. But I think you have to realize that this term is changing to mean something very different than what it originally meant.

 

I would have called myself a soccer mom 9 years ago, when we came here, but today a lot of those stay at home housewives who are classified in this way (at least in my town) may not even have children who play soccer. The term is being used in new and different ways, to define the hip and trendy moms who shop and talk on the phone all day; who wear the coolest new styles and jewelry; sport the cutting edge haircuts and perfect nails; stay a size 2 all their lives, etc., etc. And those moms seem, at least in my town, to demonstrate a sort of trend toward brain death. I know not everyone who fits this description is brainless, as I have a perfectly lovely next door neighbor. But our group had a coop opportunity at a local gymnastics/cheerleading facility a couple of years ago and we got to regularly hear "the girls" talking about how awful it was to homeschool and other tidbits of their daily lives that just left me thinking all their brain pans were empty.....

 

Now, I try to stay away from stereotyping large numbers of people on a general daily basis. I did not label these girls as "soccer moms" at the time. I do not go around town all day thinking to myself, now there's a soccer mom. But when someone brings up the term, there is a certain type of person who comes to mind for me. And that type is different now than it was a few years ago. So I wouldn't say that anyone in my town today would label me as a soccer mom. In other areas of the country, the trend may still be more what it was here when I first came here. If I moved there, I might be a "soccer mom" again.

 

Regena

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a soccer mom. Really, no joke. There might be a 12 Step Program in the foreseeable future, but now I must confess.

 

I drive an SUV (note number of children before you gasp)

Three play soccer-two competitively.

Gymnastics, track/cross country, basketball, dance. I'm the mom with the megaphone (cheerleaders never grow up). I attend every activity possible b/c I derive a great deal of joy from their competitive spirit.

I frequent Starbucks. It IS part of the uniform :)

I live in the 'burbs and dress like it.

I use the Treo as the phone/calendar/notepad hourly.

I am a card-holding Republican.

I was on PTA Board.

I had Principal on speed dial and option to hand pick teachers.

I over-volunteer and have silly little trinkets to show the endless hours.

I'm proud of our local school district. But opted to do something even better.

 

Despite all these stereotypes, one of the things that I love is the "oddity" of homeschooling. It is a teeny bit bohemian b/c it totally bucks conventional mindset!!

 

fwiw, I had fun with this post so be kind to this Soccer Mom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those middle/upper class(and for the most part white) moms, the ones likely driving their kids to soccer, and their voting habits. When Bill Clinton was running for president, many suburban mothers were breaking with their republican -voting husbands for the first time, and voting for Clinton. That is the way I understand the origins of "soccer mom".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure where I fit. The two oldest boys played soccer for one year. We liked it pretty well but then we discovered TKD and the two didn't fit together the next year. I drive a Toyota Sienna because it drives better than the SUV we had pre-baby and was much easier to put a baby seat into. I probably dress younger than most my age but it's fun. I'm 35, 5'3", 100lbs and when I can find them, they make some really cute clothes. I've never been a competitive type, especially with what my kids can or can't do. Absolutely no interest in being chummy with principals and PTO. That's somewhere close to the top of why I homeschool. :)

 

I'd guess me at 50/50 soccer mom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, time to 'fess up...

 

I am a homeschool/soccer mom hybrid.

 

I like the classic casual fashions of the "soccer moms" but my budget leans more toward J.C. Penney than Abercrombie & Fitch. I do not wear jumpers, but I do like jeans, and comfy shoes are a must (no heels here, please!)

 

I homeschool because I love teaching my own children. Even if I could find a school that I could afford which taught my kids the exact same curriculum I do with the value system I possess I would probably still homeschool.

 

I have driven a minivan since before my second child was born. I like the space.

 

I love and get excited about enrichment classes/opportunities for my kids. My vision is that all of my children would choose a sport and a musical instrument. I also like art classes, foreign language playgroups, and any other opportunities I can offer them.

 

I enjoy watching my kids and others have fun at their activities. I am more interested in seeing them enjoy themselves than evaluating their skill. I cheer for all of them, mine and others. I giggle when they fool around (and I rather enjoy the annoyed looks from the more serious moms when I do this...)

 

I do my best to provide natural whole foods for my family. I shop the health food co-op and even bake my own bread from whole wheat berries which I grind myself, but...

 

I don't do livestock.

 

I do plant a garden.

 

I occasionally make my own clothing.

 

I shop at Wal-mart.

 

And, I almost always arrive at an activity with a cup of coffee in my hand - but it is usually home-brewed in a travel mug. Black and strong, tyvm.

 

:cool: Still like me?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think any homeschooling mom could quite meet the "essence" of the term soccer mom. Often times it is used negatively.

 

In my opinion, the feeling that goes along with the negative use of the term indicates that their actions are much less about taking joy in the child, and much more about making sure they're doing the "socially acceptable" things.

 

They're more concerned about how things LOOK, having the right THINGS, and, heaven-forbid, what if they had last month's hair? Soccer games and practices are social events with the other mothers, and often times in the true spirit of "soccer-momism" the desire for their child to achieve is more about competition with the other moms than a true desire for the child to do their best.

 

I don't get that feeling from any of the "self-proclaimed" soccer moms here. :) By some definitions here, I suppose I could be called a soccer mom too. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think any homeschooling mom could quite meet the "essence" of the term soccer mom. Often times it is used negatively.

 

In my opinion, the feeling that goes along with the negative use of the term indicates that their actions are much less about taking joy in the child, and much more about making sure they're doing the "socially acceptable" things.

 

They're more concerned about how things LOOK, having the right THINGS, and, heaven-forbid, what if they had last month's hair? Soccer games and practices are social events with the other mothers, and often times in the true spirit of "soccer-momism" the desire for their child to achieve is more about competition with the other moms than a true desire for the child to do their best.

 

I don't get that feeling from any of the "self-proclaimed" soccer moms here. :) By some definitions here, I suppose I could be called a soccer mom too. ;)

 

I see what you mean and I think I tend to agree. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only interaction with "soccer moms" is very negative..

 

I was once a Team Mom for my oldest's softball team. I will NEVER do it again. EVER. The moms were catty, btichy, mean, sniveling spoiled brats who treated their children like extensions of themselves. These women could not even be bothered to help with snack rotation. If it was their turn (and they got noticed well in advance), they suddenly "forgot" and then chewed me out for not bringing anything in case they did. They argued, spit, bit, fought with the coaches and officials, yelled at their kids if they lost.. they were just plain MEAN.

 

I did PTA, ONCE. Never again. PTA was the biggest waste of space I've ever seen. To save typing time, just copy/paste all that I said above and apply it to PTA Moms.

 

I am now a Bowling Mom (and coach/league owner). AND I LOVE IT!! They are all homeschoolers and they leave their kids alone, let ME do the coaching and genuinely get in to their child's acheivments. I foster and live by a "learning environment with a bit of an edge". ;) We "compete" but we are not competitive. We have fun, but are seriously into our game. And we learn how to bowl and improve.

 

I will never ever do organized sports again. It is not worth the hassle, stress and pain (that I might inflict on the next moron that calls her kid a failure) that would follow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing like a little reflection on a Sunday afternoon.

 

A year ago, I cringed at the words "Soccer Mom." I homeschooled, and my kids did not play sports. Then they did, and I coached. Yet, I was *not* a soccer mom. I was a recluse.

 

Today, I most definitely am one.

 

In fact, I am *the* soccer mom. I co-coordinate our local YMCA soccer league. My kids are in a (fabulous)

public school. I drive a small SUV. I work part-time at the Y, and we eat dinner together when we can. One of my boys played basketball, they are all in soccer, and 2 of them are playing baseball. We spend massive amounts of our time on the road between driving to school, going to church, and being at the YMCA. We live and dress comfortably (middle class). I never leave the house without my cell phone. My deep freezer which once held frozen HOMEMADE waffles, soups, breads, and wrapped meats and OAMC meals, is now filled to the brim with convenience foods.

 

What a change... But you know what? I'm happy. My kids are THRIVING. My husband is proud of us. We love each other. We're all living lives full of achievement and accomplishment.

 

I'm a "soccer-mom" and proud of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think any homeschooling mom could quite meet the "essence" of the term soccer mom. Often times it is used negatively.

 

In my opinion, the feeling that goes along with the negative use of the term indicates that their actions are much less about taking joy in the child, and much more about making sure they're doing the "socially acceptable" things.

 

They're more concerned about how things LOOK, having the right THINGS, and, heaven-forbid, what if they had last month's hair? Soccer games and practices are social events with the other mothers, and often times in the true spirit of "soccer-momism" the desire for their child to achieve is more about competition with the other moms than a true desire for the child to do their best.

 

I don't get that feeling from any of the "self-proclaimed" soccer moms here. :) By some definitions here, I suppose I could be called a soccer mom too. ;)

 

You are right, Soccer Motherhood is much more about attitude than dress or participation in activities. I got to observe the culture as an Ice Skating Mom.

 

They used to sit around a table talking about the big expensive parties they were throwing, and they always seemed to be trying to one-up each other. Very often they would gossip about eachother behind their back, then be best friends in their presence. And they were so SERIOUS about their children - even the little ones. Where I would see a group of preschoolers having fun, their parents saw Serious Athletes.

 

I remember when I learned that one of DD's friends was working on her toe loop (first full revolution jump). I was excited for her, and attempted to strike up a light hearted conversation with the girl's parents. I very quickly learned that this was Serious Business, and not a joking matter. Later I learned they were paying a $70/hr coach for two hours a week so their little princess could learn this jump. (BTW the child's younger sister was a model, and her parents always went on about how beautiful she was. Her Daddy actually said once that "she had a face that would make alot of money one day". I just couldn't imagine describing my child that way... :eek:) Anyways, It took older sis months to learn the jump, and she was soo frustrated and under so much pressure that I just felt bad for her.

 

This was about the time I figured out the Ice Skating world was not for us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are right, Soccer Motherhood is much more about attitude than dress or participation in activities. I got to observe the culture as an Ice Skating Mom.

 

There are many similarities to the Ice Skating Mom and the Gymnastics Mom. While my girls are gymnasts, I am a soccer mom, NOT the gym mom. That's a persona I would never take. The cattiness, backstabbing, and "better than you" attitude is like fingernails on a chalkboard.

 

Proud to be a Soccer Mom, but dear Lord, don't let me be a grown up Mean Girl!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are many similarities to the Ice Skating Mom and the Gymnastics Mom. While my girls are gymnasts, I am a soccer mom, NOT the gym mom. That's a persona I would never take. The cattiness, backstabbing, and "better than you" attitude is like fingernails on a chalkboard.

 

 

Well you can participate and still not be a part of the culture - it just makes for a lot of lonely afternoons at the rink/gym.

 

FTR our main reason for retiring from skating had more to do with finances and time committment than the social atmosphere. My kids' coach was actually a wonderful Christian lady who homeschooled her own child. She had heart and truly cared about her kids beyond their skill as athletes. She was a good sport. She had Perspective. I often wondered if the more near-sighted "Ice Skating parents" ever exasperated her...

 

So what is the difference in attitude between the "Soccer Mom" and the "Skate/Gym Mom"? (Am I a "Soccer Mom" after all??)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think any homeschooling mom could quite meet the "essence" of the term soccer mom. Often times it is used negatively.

 

In my opinion, the feeling that goes along with the negative use of the term indicates that their actions are much less about taking joy in the child, and much more about making sure they're doing the "socially acceptable" things.

 

They're more concerned about how things LOOK, having the right THINGS, and, heaven-forbid, what if they had last month's hair? Soccer games and practices are social events with the other mothers, and often times in the true spirit of "soccer-momism" the desire for their child to achieve is more about competition with the other moms than a true desire for the child to do their best.

 

I don't get that feeling from any of the "self-proclaimed" soccer moms here. :) By some definitions here, I suppose I could be called a soccer mom too. ;)

 

"Soccer mom" has nothing to do with your kid playing soccer. Although I suppose a lot of their kids do! Being a soccer mom is all about a certain attitude, and that attitude has to do with kids being more status symbols than people in their own right. I think very few homeschool moms would fit that category.

Michelle T

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, I am really surprised at this thread. This is one community I wouldn't have guessed would indulge in such negative stereotyping, especially considering some of the really negative things that are often said about HSing moms by people who only know a few, or none at all. I'm sad to see this kind of tearing down done here. I've met plenty of obnoxious people, HSers and non-HSers, soccer moms and non-soccer moms, private schoolers and public schoolers, affluent and broke, well-groomed and not well-groomed, minivan-driving and SUV-driving (my old SUV, by the way, got better gas mileage than my current minivan :rolleyes:).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, I am really surprised at this thread. This is one community I wouldn't have guessed would indulge in such negative stereotyping, especially considering some of the really negative things that are often said about HSing moms by people who only know a few, or none at all. I'm sad to see this kind of tearing down done here. I've met plenty of obnoxious people, HSers and non-HSers, soccer moms and non-soccer moms, private schoolers and public schoolers, affluent and broke, well-groomed and not well-groomed, minivan-driving and SUV-driving (my old SUV, by the way, got better gas mileage than my current minivan :rolleyes:).

 

I think most of us were just having fun with the fashion stereotypes, etc., I don't consider owning an SUV to be a negative thing (though I know it isn't politically correct nowadays - for me that would only add to their appeal :D) The only truly negative observations were about people's attitudes.

 

I also find homeschooling stereotypes to be amusing and funny and not necessarily offensive. Maybe I just have a warped sense of humor.

 

I am sorry if I got carried away and hurt anybody's feelings - this really was not my intention.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I kind of thought that "soccer mom" was the new version of "yuppie mom." It kind of seems like the same qualities fit... the terminology has just changed. At least, that's the way I think of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think most of us were just having fun with the fashion stereotypes, etc., I don't consider owning an SUV to be a negative thing (though I know it isn't politically correct nowadays - for me that would only add to their appeal :D) The only truly negative observations were about people's attitudes.

 

I also find homeschooling stereotypes to be amusing and funny and not necessarily offensive. Maybe I just have a warped sense of humor.

 

I am sorry if I got carried away and hurt anybody's feelings - this really was not my intention.

 

I'm sorry, too--that came out a tad stronger than I intended, because I only had a minute to post at the time. I guess I'm sensitive to stereotype bashing because I potentially fit into so many of them, and bridge several different worlds (HSer who's secular, with PSing friends and outspokenly negative relatives; SAHM who's also a working mom; with soccer-momish tendencies, but not fully; social liberal on a forum with a large vocal conservative contingent :D, etc.), so I get to hear the worst of the worst on all sides. I hate to hear moms slamming each other. We all work so hard for our kids and ourselves, and we all have our crummy days and our good days, and our negative traits and our positive ones.

 

Eh, anyway, fooey on stereotypes :p No denim jumpers or perfect manicures in my house, ever!

 

And I forgot to say, I never knew "soccer mom" as a negative term anyway. I always thought they were the mainstream mom types--kind of like the June Cleaver for the new millennium. Neither good nor bad, just a demographic, YK?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a soccer mom with no children playing soccer. :)

 

 

  • I really want an SUV
  • I attend 4 music lessons a week
  • I go to Starbucks daily
  • I live in the 'burbs and I dress like it
  • I use my calendar to plan everything
  • I'm republican and not ashamed
  • I over-volunteer - if I didn't who will? - co-op, youth group, kids church, mission trips, exchange student program
  • I talk/email/text my teens' friends
  • I'm the "go to" adult when said teens need advice or are facing trouble
  • I love to stay young and watch what I eat and how I work out in order to achieve the goal
  • My teens school is on speeddail

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that

is a typical soccer mom. You just never know what's going on in other folks' heads--that inner self they don't let anyone else see.:D

 

Many of the gym moms I'm around are a lot like that soccer mom stereotype. They used to scare the bejeezus out of me. Our old gym was different. It was very West Side and this is East Side. (Wichita has a big East/West thing.) Many of the families were blue collar or lower level white collar.

 

When we switched gyms, I felt very out of place. These were real gym/soccer moms. Do y'all remember Kelli's "I don't want to be a sorority mom" post? That's how I felt. These women were all so perfect.

 

After being at this gym for a few years, I've gotten to know the other parents a little better and they really aren't what they seemed at first. Most of them are very nice, normal folks. Even if their normal is a little different from mine;)

 

I've also come to realize that my perception of them at the beginning had less to do with them and more to do with how I think about myself. It wasn't that they were too perfect but that I had doubts about myself. I was the one doing the measuring and I continually found myself lacking. It wasn't that they were snobby but that I expected not to be accepted and therefore I was standoffish with them. Ugh. It was like high school all over again.

 

These threads about different stereotypes are interesting. We all judge people by their appearances to some degree. It must be human nature. I'm not sure we can help those thoughts, but we can change how much we allow them to affect us. Has anyone else noticed how much that high school mentality continues to sway us? Why is that?

 

People are all so different and interesting. Underneath those fascinating and sometimes frightening differences, though, we are all very much alike. We have many of the same needs, desires, and emotions. Everyone deserves a closer look beyond what clothes they wear, what car they drive, and which activities their children participate in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...