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I have a habit of wishing people good luck when I hope things work well for them. I had a friend recently that requested I not say that to her anymore. We are moderate to conservative Christians and don't really believe in luck. I guess what I really mean is best wishes. I have never really thought about it and don't want to offend anyone. Does anyone else have a problem with this and if so why?

 

:001_smile:

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Yes :) Luck is akin to words like stupid, fart, and cr@p in our house. We don't say it.

 

The reason? A couple times in the scriptures, there is a reference to "good luck." And each time, it is either in reference to satan (or false worship) or leaving the true God.

 

So instead, we say things like, "best to you" or "I know you'll do well" or whatever. It kinda depends on the situation.

 

ETA: There are VERY few people in this world I would ask to not say it to me though. Like rockermom, I understand the sentiment behind it and take that over the words. So yes, it makes me cringe a little, but I wouldn't have told you.

Edited by 2J5M9K
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I have a habit of wishing people good luck when I hope things work well for them. I had a friend recently that requested I not say that to her anymore. We are moderate to conservative Christians and don't really believe in luck. I guess what I really mean is best wishes. I have never really thought about it and don't want to offend anyone. Does anyone else have a problem with this and if so why?

 

:001_smile:

 

I don't believe in luck, either, but no, it doesn't offend me. I realize that the person saying it to me is wanting good things for me and/or my family.

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I don't believe in luck in the cosmic 'God is in control' sense, but I believe in it on the human level... meaning that WE do not know what will happen to anyone and YES, on our level, some get good luck and some do not.

 

I do wish people good luck - often - and always mean something to the effect of 'best wishes' I suppose. I don't get hung up on semantics and wish others didn't either. After all, it means the exact same thing... but one word is supposed to be bad and the other isn't?

 

Probably once or twice in my lifetime I've been chided for saying it. It's been a while since that's happened though. I guess I would try to respect their wishes on it, but it would be difficult. From a human perspective it wouldn't make me think all that highly of them... but I do try to live and let live. I gather they would think similar thoughts about me. :)

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I never feel offended. Can't find any basis for feeling offended.

 

As a Christian, however, I know that there is no such thing as "luck." I left off using the phrase. At conversational points when one might say "good luck", I substitute (for a Christian) either "May it be blessed !" or "May God's will be done !" Else I just say, "I hope it goes well for you !"

 

This is similar to somebody telling me, "God bless you!" when I sneeze. Only a priest possesses the authority to offer a blessing from God, laypeople do not. So, again, I just honor the friendly intention of the speaker and say "Thank you!"

Edited by Orthodox6
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I wouldn't say I'm offended by the phrase 'Good luck.' I don't believe in luck and I am a solid believer of 'God is in control.'

 

If the conversation between you and I were regarding something that luck had nothing to do with...I might say something to you if the point was pressed. However, I'd consider the sentiment behind the phrase.

 

In our home, we do not allow the phrase 'good luck' to be used as a verbal salutation. For many of the same reasons as Pamela H in Texas already stated and if that's all our children have to reply with, then we need to expand their vocabulary. Mostly I consider it as a catch phrase that often people don't have any hidden agenda behind in saying it.

 

:D

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"The harder I work, the luckier I get." :)

 

I always thank any well-wisher. But I don't believe in luck. But I also think it's extraordinarily foolish to fret so much about using the word "luck" that we can't call them "potluck" dinners any more...it's all covered dish. Sigh. So silly.

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I wouldn't be offended, but I don't like the expression. I don't believe in luck. If you only said it once, I would let it go. If you said it to me very often, I might tell you my thoughts. I teach my dc that people are not lucky. They are blessed by God, but not lucky. If someone has something really cool it's because they or someone close to them worked hard to earn the money to buy it, and that happened because God gave them the ability to do so. It wasn't some random thing like luck.

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This is similar to somebody telling me, "God bless you!" when I sneeze. Only a priest possesses the authority to offer a blessing from God, laypeople do not. So, again, I just honor the friendly intention of the speaker and say "Thank you!"

 

Yes, I agree this is similar. I don't like "God bless you" at all and it is not said by those in our home. Our reasoning is different than yours, but we also believe it inappropriate. However, I do believe the person saying it is just being friendly; it's probably just habit.

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My MIL is offended by it. Instead of saying, "that's really lucky," she always says, "it's God's Providence." We don't say it here either, because we want to be sure that the kids know and that we are reminded that all good things are from the Lord. To wish someone good luck, we always say, "hope you do well," or something similar, but for someone else to say it it's not offensive.

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Oops...

 

I wish people good luck all the time, especially when responding to posts where someone is trying to accomplish something (sorry) and the thought has never crossed my mind that it could be construed as insulting or inappropriate.

 

So, I am sorry if I have offended any of you with this. I never questioned where the term came from, so guess that is why. Sorry!

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I don't believe in "luck" really- there are blessings from God, and there is the result of one's own hard work.

 

But I never had any idea that the expression "good luck" was offensive to some. Just never even considered that possibility. Or "God bless you"- I thought it was supposed to be bad manners not to say it. I just think of them as sort of bland, automatic things you say- like "good morning" even if it's not.

 

(Guess I'm a little edgy this morning- tried making small talk with my SIL and every attempt got shot down. Kids' playing soccer? "That sounds nice." "No it's not." How's the weather? "Sunny." "That sounds nice." "No, we're in a drought." Definitely shoulda asked for the bean dip! LOL.)

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I am not offended by it. I do not believe in it, but I do still say it from time to time. It's a hard habit to break. It's like asking the lady at the check out how she is even though you really don't expect her to give you details.

 

Our eldest said it to other Christian friends of ours, and he received a big lecture about it being spiritually off and so forth.

 

These people are so strict with these sorts of things. I understand the sentiment, but if you ever saw the way they respond to people, it's like they've forgotten other matters of importance. One December, the dad came by, and my then 6 year old said "Merry Christmas" to him. He said it a few more times, bewildered that this man was ignoring him. I finally said, in front of the Dad and my family, "Ben, Mr. ____ doesn't celebrate Christmas which is why he is not saying anything back to you."

 

All the man had to do was say, "Thank you, but we don't celebrate Christmas." He then continued to tell us his father hurt himself trying to hang Christmas lights by falling off the roof; therefore, it is clear that decorating for Christmas is detrimental." To this I said, "So, I guess he doesn't clean out his gutters either."

 

It's just the whole rudeness thing that gets me. If I were adamant about the good luck thing, I'm sure I could be so without being obnoxious.

 

BTW -- This same family has sneaked into movie theaters, carries radar detectors in their vehicles, and many more things that I think are much more problematic than saying "Good luck."

 

I have a habit of wishing people good luck when I hope things work well for them. I had a friend recently that requested I not say that to her anymore. We are moderate to conservative Christians and don't really believe in luck. I guess what I really mean is best wishes. I have never really thought about it and don't want to offend anyone. Does anyone else have a problem with this and if so why?

 

ETA: Reading over the posts, I now remember it wasn't "good luck" my son had said -- it was "bless you" when one of the parents sneezed. They went on about how people say that because they are trying to keep your soul from escaping, etc. etc. Honestly, my son was just trying to be nice, and I haven't met anyone who is dumb enough to think your soul escapes when you sneeze. Perhaps if I lived in the 1600's I'd meet some. LOL

 

:001_smile:

Edited by nestof3
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I don't believe in luck, but it doesn't offend me. I know the person saying it has good intentions.

 

I totally agree. I think our society needs to get over PC-ness with words and phrases...what ever happened to "I'm rubber and you're glue..." :D???!!!

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Conservative Christian here - I say, "Good luck" all the time. It's semantics to take it apart if you ask me. It means the same as "best wishes", "Blessings" etc. I don't believe in luck either. But this is just a common phrase with a meaning bigger then the meaning of each individual word. Like "Break a Leg" certainly isn't literal. Everybody KNOWS what it means and what is mean by saying it. What on earth is "luck" anyway? If you ask me, saying, "Good Luck!" is just a nice way to wish someone a best outcome in what ever they are doing.

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My MIL is offended by it. Instead of saying, "that's really lucky," she always says, "it's God's Providence." We don't say it here either, because we want to be sure that the kids know and that we are reminded that all good things are from the Lord. To wish someone good luck, we always say, "hope you do well," or something similar, but for someone else to say it it's not offensive.

 

I actually get more ruffled when I hear people say "it's God's providence" to everything. I am not quick to assume I know God's plan in everything.

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BTW -- This same family has sneaked into movie theaters, carries radar detectors in their vehicles, and many more things that I think are much more problematic than saying "Good luck."

 

Modern day pharisees? I'd have a hard time having much enthusiasm for remaining friends with someone like that.

 

Good luck with that. :lol: (I'm just kidding around...pun on the topic...)

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As I said earlier I don't believe in luck, but had never really considered the phrase before. I probably should replace it with something more appropriate. I am close enough with this person to understand where she is coming form and was not upset. She only told me because she knew I would never intentionally set out to offend her. This started with someone saying "Well that really sucks." I heard the phrase my entire life and never connected it with anything other than "that is really rotten". NOW that was an eye opening conversation and a phrase I am much more conscience of saying. Thanks for the thoughts! :)

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Not offended, but I do catch myself and stop my self from saying it fairly often because I've really wondered about this over the past few years. I don't believe in luck, so why do I wish it on others?

 

Many of us grew up hearing (and saying) things like this because that's how people talked in our families, and we just repeat out of habit and without thinking. Like, for instance, the way my family taught me to say "Eenie, meenie, minee, moe, catch a "nig**r" by the toe...." Good grief! I taught myself to stop saying that one all by myself -- it was a no brainer!! But it was a sign of the times I grew up in (60's-70's) and there were radical changes everywhere -- even in our daily conversations. How I cringe when I think of innocent children uttering such things from their mouths!

 

I'm for sure going to make an effort to completely wipe the good luck slogan from my vocabulary after reading this thread. The things that come out of our minds should match up with what's going on in our minds and hearts.

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

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To me, it is just a matter of semantics.

 

Sometimes luck is involved - for example in a Game of Candy land. It is not skill, it is not God's will, it is just the luck of the draw who wins. What is that? Just a "game of randomness"? Just easier to say luck! Really, who wouldn't know what you meant?

 

Saying "good luck" to someone who is about to take the SAT's? Well, IMO, that just means best wishes. No one really thinks those who do well on the SAT's are "lucky" right?

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Like many others I just had't thought about it in that particular way. I don't believe in luck and certainly don't rely on it. I know God has a plan and mysterious and wonderous it is, too.

 

However, I disagree on the "God bless you!" issue. That's a prayer, not a formal, priestly benediction or blessing . . . a competely different thing altogether.

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I tend not to say "good luck" myself, but I think it's probably a good phrase to reconsider saying if you find the underlying words offensive.

 

This is similar to somebody telling me, "God bless you!" when I sneeze. Only a priest possesses the authority to offer a blessing from God, laypeople do not. So, again, I just honor the friendly intention of the speaker and say "Thank you!"

I'm really fascinated by this. I sort of assumed "God bless you" was more an invocation or prayer on the part of the speaker, asking, requesting, praying for God to bless you (in other words, short for "May God bless you") rather than a statement of absolute fact that God has already blessed you (in the sense you seem to be expressing that for you, only a priest may issue blessings "on behalf of" God) -- but I could be entirely wrong on this, I'm no expert.

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Conservative Christian here - I say, "Good luck" all the time. It's semantics to take it apart if you ask me. It means the same as "best wishes", "Blessings" etc. I don't believe in luck either. But this is just a common phrase with a meaning bigger then the meaning of each individual word. Like "Break a Leg" certainly isn't literal. Everybody KNOWS what it means and what is mean by saying it. What on earth is "luck" anyway? If you ask me, saying, "Good Luck!" is just a nice way to wish someone a best outcome in what ever they are doing.

:iagree: This is pretty much how I feel. No, I don't believe in some cosmic force called luck, but I say it all the time because it's a general wish of good will.

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Reflexively, I responded as any Orthodox Christian would have. What other groups do is their custom/belief. For us, only a priest or bishop may bless. I wasn't meaning to extend this to other groups with their own beliefs.

 

I tend not to say "good luck" myself, but I think it's probably a good phrase to reconsider saying if you find the underlying words offensive.

 

 

I'm really fascinated by this. I sort of assumed "God bless you" was more an invocation or prayer on the part of the speaker, asking, requesting, praying for God to bless you (in other words, short for "May God bless you") rather than a statement of absolute fact that God has already blessed you (in the sense you seem to be expressing that for you, only a priest may issue blessings "on behalf of" God) -- but I could be entirely wrong on this, I'm no expert.

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I have noticed a few times that a certain person does seem to be "lucky" and another seems to be very "unlucky". I'm not talking about specific things that are within a person's control. But has anyone else ever noticed this? I know someone whom I call (to myself) "unlucky". So much undeserved misfortune has come this poor guy's way. He is a good, decent, hardworking guy, but bad stuff has come his way so many times, it just seems...well, unlucky! Another person I know has had things go well for him so often, even things that are just bizarre and not related to anything he did or any decision he made. He was contacted by someone who wanted a number he was using and the person was willing to pay over a hundred thousand dollars for this number! That is like someone saying they want to register their car with your license plate and that they will pay any amount to have it. My friends, that is just lucky! :D

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Yes :) Luck is akin to words like stupid, fart, and cr@p in our house. We don't say it.

 

The reason? A couple times in the scriptures, there is a reference to "good luck." And each time, it is either in reference to satan (or false worship) or leaving the true God.

 

So instead, we say things like, "best to you" or "I know you'll do well" or whatever. It kinda depends on the situation.

 

ETA: There are VERY few people in this world I would ask to not say it to me though. Like rockermom, I understand the sentiment behind it and take that over the words. So yes, it makes me cringe a little, but I wouldn't have told you.

 

Pamela,

For the last few weeks I've been using my Strongs Concordance to help me study scripture. So when you mentioned the word luck in the Bible I went to my concordance to find where it mentioned it in the Bible as well as to find the Greek or Hebrew meaning for it. My Strongs does not even list the word. Is it a word similar to luck you are meaning, or is Strongs lacking many of the words in the Bible?

 

Thanks,

RhondaM.

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I don't believe in luck in the cosmic 'God is in control' sense, but I believe in it on the human level... meaning that WE do not know what will happen to anyone and YES, on our level, some get good luck and some do not.

 

I do wish people good luck - often - and always mean something to the effect of 'best wishes' I suppose. I don't get hung up on semantics and wish others didn't either. After all, it means the exact same thing... but one word is supposed to be bad and the other isn't?

 

Probably once or twice in my lifetime I've been chided for saying it. It's been a while since that's happened though. I guess I would try to respect their wishes on it, but it would be difficult. From a human perspective it wouldn't make me think all that highly of them... but I do try to live and let live. I gather they would think similar thoughts about me. :)

 

Thank you! I swallow my tongue when someone lays into me about wishing them good luck. It is just a way of saying I wish the best for them. It is not a theological thing...at least that is how I've always seen it. I find it frustrating that I'm expected to understand and sympathize with everyone's view point--and change my own actions and words to fit how they see the world--from luck to theology to going green. Sigh. For a society that is suppose to be so blankety-blank tollerant, I certainly find very few who see it applying to themselves.

 

 

...

 

Wow. I just reread that. I guess all these folks calling and complaining to me all day has gotten to me. I'm about ready to bite back. If someone offers you an astronomy program, offering her time and gas money and knowledge without getting anything back in return but the feeling of goodwill, I suggest you don't get mad at her because she won't drop everything and do another program on ONE MORE night of this week.

 

Grumble.

 

Jean

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Thank you! I swallow my tongue when someone lays into me about wishing them good luck. It is just a way of saying I wish the best for them. It is not a theological thing...at least that is how I've always seen it. I find it frustrating that I'm expected to understand and sympathize with everyone's view point--and change my own actions and words to fit how they see the world--from luck to theology to going green. Sigh. For a society that is suppose to be so blankety-blank tollerant, I certainly find very few who see it applying to themselves.

...

 

 

 

:iagree:

 

FWIW, I can't remember the last time I was offended by something someone had said to me. I know I cringe when I hear young people curse and use vulgar terms, but that is the only thing I've witness that I would say is "offensive." I am not even offended by people who share opinions that are contrary to mine. I'm mean it's THEIR opinion. I must be missing something...

 

K

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I never really thought about this until I read the OP.

 

It's funny, coming from a theater background, I was taught early on *never* to wish good luck to someone in the theater. But saying break a leg annoyed me even when I was a child. I though it was ridiculous, so whenever it came up I would say, "go get 'em" or "do well."

 

To me, saying good luck is pretty much synonymous with best wishes, or hope it goes well. But now that I realize it might offend or annoy, I'm going to rethink it.

 

I just can't believe I've managed 40 years of Christianity without making the luck/God connection.

 

Sometimes I think I'm Marcy from Peanuts. It really takes me a while to catch up with what's going on!

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Oh my goodness, do I have worry about using the word luck now with people. I'm starting to feel like when I meet someone new I should ask them for a list of words/topics they find offensive. Or maybe it would just be easier to quit talking to people.

 

If I ever wished you luck, please believe me that I never meant any offense. Honestly.

 

Janet

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Conservative Christian here - I say, "Good luck" all the time. It's semantics to take it apart if you ask me. It means the same as "best wishes", "Blessings" etc. I don't believe in luck either. But this is just a common phrase with a meaning bigger then the meaning of each individual word. Like "Break a Leg" certainly isn't literal. Everybody KNOWS what it means and what is mean by saying it. What on earth is "luck" anyway? If you ask me, saying, "Good Luck!" is just a nice way to wish someone a best outcome in what ever they are doing.

 

:iagree:

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Oh my goodness, do I have worry about using the word luck now with people. I'm starting to feel like when I meet someone new I should ask them for a list of words/topics they find offensive. Or maybe it would just be easier to quit talking to people.

 

If I ever wished you luck, please believe me that I never meant any offense. Honestly.

 

Janet

:iagree:

 

Pretty soon, our lovely, PC, tolerant world is going to have us walking on eggshells and carrying lists of appropriate terminology and topics of conversation.

 

I am getting a little offended myself at all the little nitpicky stuff that people seem to find offensive, especially when it is pretty obviously and traditionally innocuous.

 

Or maybe I am just getting defensive over nothing.

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I have absolutely no problem with anyone wishing me anything positive. Whether it is Good Luck, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Solstice, Merry Christmas, or Happy Father's Day (even though I am a girl). I look at the intention of the well wisher, and the fact that they acknowledge me in their beliefs.

 

I appreciate the fact that they wish me well, however they worded it doesn't matter to me. There is no way I would correct someone and tell them that I don't practice the same holidays or use the same 'words of faith' they do, and because of that I won't accept the positive thoughts and sentiments.

 

Unless it was a very close friend and/or part of a discussion that we were having, I would never take a happy wish, and turn it into anything other than that, and especially not turn it into a time to scold the well wisher.

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Oh my goodness, do I have worry about using the word luck now with people. I'm starting to feel like when I meet someone new I should ask them for a list of words/topics they find offensive. Or maybe it would just be easier to quit talking to people.

 

If I ever wished you luck, please believe me that I never meant any offense. Honestly.

 

Janet

 

 

:iagree: :lol: I say it all the time and had never, ever thought about it in any other sense than just wishing someone well!

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It seems to be the general population here is *not* offended by the phrase, even if we don't personally believe in luck. What is the big deal? :confused:

 

:iagree:

 

Pretty soon, our lovely, PC, tolerant world is going to have us walking on eggshells and carrying lists of appropriate terminology and topics of conversation.

 

I am getting a little offended myself at all the little nitpicky stuff that people seem to find offensive, especially when it is pretty obviously and traditionally innocuous.

 

Or maybe I am just getting defensive over nothing.

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I never considered this phrase to be possibly offensive :confused:

I am happy to have someone wish me luck, although I'm not really sure if I believe in "luck" or not. It does bother me, though, when people say "good luck" in a sarcastic way, as if they don't believe that you will really succeed (in whatever it is that you're trying to do)...

 

As for saying "God Bless You" when someone sneezes...

I studied a little about superstitions in school. (I was in the CLUE program, something like APEX, and this was a mini-study that we did.) I found them fascinating, even if I am not really superstitious myself. I looked it up on wiki-pedia to refresh my memory, but this is what I remember learning:

 

"Another version says that people used to believe that your soul can be thrown from your body when you sneeze,[1] that sneezing otherwise opened your body to invasion by the Devil[3] or evil spirits,[2] or that sneezing was your body's effort to force out an invading evil spirit.[1] Thus, "bless you" or "God bless you" is used as a sort of shield against evil."

 

If you care to read more (it's interesting!), this is the page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bless_You

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